MediaFile

As Apple’s Passbook hits the scene, Tello tries to end coupon envy

iPhone users get the closest thing Apple has made to a digital wallet on Wednesday with the release of iOS 6’s new Passbook app, which stores electronic coupons, loyalty cards and tickets.

But where will all those nifty new digital coupons come from?

For coffee shops, corner pizzerias and other small businesses that don’t have in-house engineers to create their own Passbook coupons, a new service launching Wednesday aims to make it easy.

PassTools is a Web-based service that lets businesses quickly create Passbook coupons with a few clicks. The service, which costs $99 a month for up to 1,000 Passbook coupons or tickets, is the latest product from Tello, a Silicon Valley start-up that has until now focused on an online customer-feedback service for businesses.

“This is just another tool in the arsenal for businesses to get feedback,” said Tello co-founder Joe Beninato, noting that coupons and reward cards can provide an ideal channel for businesses to solicit information on customer satisfaction.

Since Apple first discussed Passbook in June, Tello has raced to build the PassTools product, working closely with the iPhone maker, said Beninato. In the coming weeks,  Tello will release additional features aimed at larger businesses, such as airlines offering boarding passes, he said.

Tello tries to make customer service gripes more effective

From firing off angry tweets to writing nasty Yelp reviews, there are many ways to vent about bad customer service in the age of social media.

But while it feels good to blow off steam, it doesn’t always produce results for companies or customers.

Tello, a year-old mobile app that lets consumers rate the employees who served them at restaurants, shops and other businesses, is looking to make all that online griping more productive for both consumers and businesses.

Online customer service reviews get personal with Tello

Remember the flight attendant who imperiously cut you off after the second cocktail on your trans-Atlantic flight? Or how about that tech-support guy who heroically spent hours on the phone with you and solved the mysterious problem plaguing your PC?

Tello1A new Internet service unveiled on Wednesday is hoping to catch-on with consumers by providing an easy way to give kudos to the best customer service experiences and to flag the most egregious.

Online reviews are not exactly new, of course – the Web has proved a popular medium for consumers to rate businesses and vent about service for years through sites such as Yelp and Facebook.