MediaFile

Hulu’s rise continues…

Hulu, the video site owned by NBC, News Corp and Disney, is safely ensconced in the No.2 most viewed video site in the U.S. according to latest February data from comScore. And Hulu is making progress not just in the quantity of views but in the quality of views: Users watched a record amount of video per person during the month. The average Hulu users watched 23.3 videos  at 2.4 hours of video per viewer. This compares with the average online video length at 4.3 minutes.

It’s all very promising for the powers at NBC Universal, and its new owners at Comcast, as well as News Corp and Disney, who have been reported to be considering charging to view some of the videos on Hulu. One imagines they’ll probably add more cable content as part of the TV Everywhere initiaitve.

It’ll be more interesting to see how Hulu’s viewer numbers perform in March as it will be the first month after Viacom pulled its Comedy Central videos, including the hugely popular Daily Show with Jon Stewart. Our bet is that Hulu’s continuing growth will offset most of the losses from viewers of Jon Stewart.

Of course, YouTube remains by far and way the top dog with 11.9 billion videos viewed in February compared with 912.5 million videos on Hulu. Microsoft came in third with 623 million videos and Yahoo sites had 455 million. Top U.S. Online Video Content Properties* by Videos Viewed
February 2010
Total U.S. – Home/Work/University Locations
Source: comScore Video Metrix Property Videos (000) Share of Videos (%) Total Internet : Total Audience 28,123,542 100.0 Google Sites 11,950,024 42.5 Hulu 912,525 3.2 Microsoft Sites 622,569 2.2 Yahoo! Sites 454,761 1.6 Turner Network 317,623 1.1 Viacom Digital 305,155 1.1 Fox Interactive Media 290,181 1.0 CBS Interactive 289,303 1.0 AOL LLC 240,102 0.9 Megavideo.com 188,555 0.7

YouTube has 24 hours of video uploaded every minute

YouTube, the world’s most popular video site, has just revealed that a whole day’s worth of online video is uploaded to its servers every single minute. That’s a mind-boggling statistic when you bear in mind this site is just five years old.

Last May YouTube, which is owned by search giant Google, revealed up to 20 hours of video are uploaded every minute.YouTube hours of video graph Clearly more and more people are using online video and this graphic from the YouTube blog shows the trajectory.

from Shop Talk:

Unicorn + Clown = Surprise hit for Walmart

clownIf the NFL playoff games weren't filled with enough unexpected action to keep you awake this past Sunday, something else was -- a screaming clown.

Walmart aired a new commercial during the games this weekend meant to promote its low prices on party supplies.

Good timing, considering millions of Americans are getting ready to host parties for the Feb. 7 Super Bowl game.

Warner’s music comes to Hulu, still not on Vevo

JasonMrazWarner Music has just announced that it has signed up to offer music videos, live shows and interviews of its artists on the popular online video site Hulu.

This is interesting as Warner Music is the only one of the so-called big four major music companies that hasn’t signed up to put its music on Vevo, the premium music video site jointly owned by Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment and Abu Dhabi Media Company. Vevo is built on the technology platform of YouTube. Warner and YouTube have recently fallen out then settled over licensing terms.

Ultimately, this is about business for Warner. As the only publicly traded music company, Warner Music Group seems keen to occasionally go a different route from its other major label rivals as its executives will argue they have shareholders to answer to.

YouTube: “We’re still kings of the world!”

YouTube, the video site, is celebrating the third anniversary since it was bought by Google with news that it now serves more than a billion views a day to users around the world.

In a blog by YouTube CEO and co-founder Chad Hurley, he reminisces about how he and co-founder/former CTO Steve Chen made a fun video declaring themselves the “burger kings of media”. How sweet.

But on the serious side of the media equation Hurley has some important points about the fast changing world of online video (You could also call it the ‘why we won’ manifesto).

from Commentaries:

Gut feeling: How Google CEO valued YouTube deal

Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO of Google, sits for an interview at the Newseum in Washington on Oct. 2, 2009Let the second-guessing, the mock horror, the disbelief, the crowing begin.

Google CEO Eric Schmidt has acknowledged he realized upfront that he was overpaying to acquire YouTube, to the tune of $1 billion, judged by any conventional measures.

The many critics of Google's $1.65 billion deal to acquire the video-sharing site three years ago will claim this confirms everything they have always said about the deal. Not quite.

In fact, not really at all.

Schmidt came clean in a deposition by lawyers in the Viacom copyright lawsuit that there was very little revenue coming into YouTube to justify the price his company paid.

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings on Xbox, Youtube, iPhone

We caught up with Netflix CEO Reed Hastings at the movie rental company’s event where it awarded a $1 million prize after a contest aimed at improving the accuracy of movie recommendations. He spoke about his hopes of working with Apple on the iPhone, the possibility that YouTube will beef up its movie service, and the future of the DVD.

Reuters: What will Netflix subscribers gain from the improvements in the recommendation system?

Hastings: It’s doubling the quality of our movie recommendation and that helps our subscribers get more enjoyment from movies. Because more often they love the movie they watch. More often the movies recommended will will turn out to be movies that you love. If you watch a couple of movies and don’t like many, you start to watch (sports and other programming). If every movie is incredible, you start to watch more.

YouTube goes live Outside with Dave Matthews

YouTube is getting together with the organizers of the Outside Lands Music & Arts Festival to bring the show live to its users in the U.S. starting this Friday Aug 28th through to Sunday Aug 30th.

Top of the bill is Dave Mathews Band along with Jason Mraz, Raphael Saddiq, Thievery Corporation and many others all performing at the event in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park.

The live webcast will feature on youtube.com/outsidelands and fans will also be able to access an archive of selected performances and highlights on YouTube’s Outside Lands channel.

Is Google’s message on YouTube starting to get through?

YouTube executives and spinmeisters have been pushing back more aggressively at the perception that the video site is a great big drain on Google’s bottomline, probably  losing $200 million to $500 million a year by some estimates. These execs say that hundreds of major advertisers are taking spots on YouTube against “hundreds of millions” of video views every week.

The problem with this is the lack of precise details. How much revenue is YouTube generating from these monetized videos exactly (even approximately)? And how much does it cost to stream and store those hundreds of millions of videos every week? Google and YouTube decline to provide any numbers other than to say things are moving in the right direction. Wall Street and investors are yet to be convinced.

Goldman Sachs analyst James Mitchell is the latest to have a shot at a respectable estimate for YouTube. He says it will generate around $300 million in 2009. He also thinks the best is yet to come from YouTube — and that Google will see some benefit.

YouTube’s mythbusters: When blogs attack

It’s taken a while but YouTube is officially pushing back at the various estimates on how much money it costs parent Google by satisfying our collective hunger for million of video clips every day. Google paid $1.65 billion for YouTube in 2006, when it bought the site from Chad Hurley and former CTO Steve Chen (pictured).

Various YouTube executives we’ve spoken to privately over the last year have bristled at the idea that they are an expensive experiment for Google without a clear profit-making business model. Google CEO Eric Schmidt took the first step in a change of communications strategy in an group interview with reporters at the Sun Valley conference two weeks ago, and to more listeners on the Google earnings call on Thursday. His central point was that everyone’s favorite video site is on the path to profitability.

On Monday, two of YouTube’s PR executives hit back at some of the myths about YouTube’s business with a blog titled “YouTube myth busting.” These include claims that it only features short-form, grainy user-generated content when in fact it has deals with Hollywood partners and features HD content. They also said more than 70 percent of AdAge Top 100 marketers ran campaigns on YouTube in 2008.