Michael's Feed
Dec 22, 2011

Exclusive: Pakistan army wants Zardari out but not a coup

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan’s powerful army is fed up with unpopular President Asif Ali Zardari and wants him out of office, but through legal means and without a repeat of the coups that are a hallmark of the country’s 64 years of independence, military sources said.

Tensions are rising between Pakistan’s civilian leaders and its generals over a memo that accused the army of plotting a coup after the U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden in May.

Dec 13, 2011

US lawmakers freeze $700 mln to Pakistan as distrust grows

ISLAMABAD, Dec 13 (Reuters) – A crisis in relations
looked set to deepen after a U.S. House-Senate negotiating panel
agreed to freeze $700 million in aid to Pakistan until it gives
assurances it is helping fight the spread of improvised
explosive devices in the region.

Pakistan is one of the largest recipients of U.S. foreign
aid and the cutback announced is only a small proportion of the
billions in civil and military assistance it gets each year.

Dec 13, 2011

U.S. lawmakers freeze $700 million to Pakistan as distrust grows

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – A crisis in relations looked set to deepen after a House-Senate negotiating panel agreed to freeze $700 million in U.S. aid to Pakistan until it gives assurances it is helping fight the spread of improvised explosive devices in the region.

Pakistan is one of the largest recipients of U.S. foreign aid, and the cutback announced is only a small proportion of the billions in civil and military assistance it gets each year.

Dec 7, 2011
via FaithWorld

Mission impossible for Pakistani progressives?

Photo

(The Shah Faisal Mosque is seen from the Margalla Hills in Pakistan's capital Islamabad July 31, 2007. REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

The small but enthusiastic group of “progressive” Muslims arrives at a hotel conference room in Pakistan’s capital with the tools they hope will help blunt extremism in the unstable U.S. ally. The Khudi organisation — self-esteem in Urdu — does not expect the government to tackle the problem of spreading Islamist radicalism. So it has taken on what seems to be mission impossible — creating a social movement that can reverse the growing tide.

Dec 2, 2011

After NATO strike, Pakistan adjusts rules of engagement

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan’s commanders in the wild Afghan border region can return fire if attacked without waiting for permission, the army chief said, a change in rules of engagement that could stoke tension after Saturday’s NATO strike killed 24 Pakistani troops.

The attack sparked fury in Pakistan and further complicated U.S.-led efforts to ease a crisis in relations with Islamabad, still seething at a secret U.S. raid in May which killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, and stabilize the region before foreign combat troops leave Afghanistan in 2014.

Dec 1, 2011

NATO attack could hurt war on terror – Pakistan

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan, enraged by a NATO cross-border air attack that killed 24 soldiers, could withdraw its support for the U.S. war on militancy if its sovereignty is violated again, the foreign minister suggested in comments published on Thursday.

The South Asian nation has already shown its anger over the weekend strike by pulling out of an international conference in Germany next week on Afghanistan’s future.

Nov 30, 2011

NATO attack was blatant aggression: Pakistan army

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – A senior Pakistani army official has said a NATO cross-border air attack that killed 24 soldiers was a deliberate, blatant act of aggression, hardening Pakistan’s stance on an incident which could hurt efforts to stabilize Afghanistan.

In a briefing to editors carried in local newspapers on Wednesday, Major-General Ishfaq Nadeem, director general of military operations, also said NATO forces were alerted they were attacking Pakistani posts, but helicopters kept firing.

Nov 28, 2011

Pakistan warns NATO attack threatens Afghanistan peace

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan ratcheted up pressure on NATO on Monday over a cross-border attack that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers at the weekend, threatening to drastically reduce cooperation on peace efforts in Afghanistan.

The incident has hurt Washington’s efforts both to ease a crisis in relations with Islamabad and stabilize the region as it tries to wind down the war in Afghanistan.

Nov 27, 2011

Rage grips Pakistan over NATO attack

ISLAMABAD/KABUL (Reuters) – Fury spread in Pakistan on Sunday over a NATO cross-border air attack that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers and could undermine the U.S. effort to wind up the war in Afghanistan.

On Sunday night in Pakistan, more than 40 hours after the incident, many questions remained.

Nov 21, 2011

Taliban, Pakistan said to have started peace talks

ISLAMABAD, Nov 21 (Reuters) – Pakistan’s Taliban
movement, a major security threat to the country, is holding
exploratory peace talks with the government, a senior Taliban
commander and mediators told Reuters on Monday.

The United States, the source of billions of dollars of aid
vital for Pakistan’s military and feeble economy, is unlikely to
look kindly on peace talks with the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan
(TTP), which it has labelled a terrorist group.