Michael's Feed
Oct 13, 2011

Pakistanis wonder what more they can do in war on militancy

RAWALPINDI, Pakistan (Reuters) – When Pakistan Army Sergeant Abdur Rehman hears America’s oft-repeated demand that Pakistan do more to fight militants, he glances down at the stumps of his legs and wonders what more it wants from him.

A mortar bomb shredded him from the waist down as he led an advance against Taliban fighters in 2007 in Pakistan’s unruly northwestern tribal areas on the Afghan border.

Oct 2, 2011

Dreaded militant hit squad goes rogue in Pakistan

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – A blindfolded man stands on explosives, trembling as he confesses to spying for the CIA in Pakistan. Armed men in black balaclavas slowly back away. Then he is blown up.

One of his executioners — members of an elite militant hit squad — zooms a camera in on his severed head and body parts for a video later distributed in street markets as a warning.

Sep 26, 2011

U.S. pressure fuels anti-Americanism in Pakistan

(Reuters) – Mounting pressure on Pakistan to go after a militant group blamed for attacks on U.S. targets in Afghanistan is deepening anti-American sentiment, highlighting how difficult it will be for Washington to win more support for its war on militancy.

The rising antipathy to the United States also makes it tougher for the government, already unpopular because of widespread allegations of corruption and its failure to tackle poverty, to do anything that will be seen as caving into U.S. demands to crack down harder on militancy.

Sep 26, 2011

Pakistan will not attack Haqqani group, defying U.S.: report

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan’s military will not take action against the Haqqani militant group that Washington blames for an attack against its embassy in Kabul, despite mounting American pressure to do so, a Pakistani newspaper reported on Monday.

Army chief General Ashfaq Kayani held a “special” meeting with his top commanders on Sunday to discuss the security situation, the military said, after a week of tension and tit-for-tat rhetoric with the United States.

Sep 23, 2011

Haqqani chief: U.S. will suffer if it tries attack

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Sirajuddin Haqqani does not carry a gun or wear a turban as he moves stealthily through the Waziristan wilderness along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, hoping to avoid detection and getting hit by a U.S. missile from a drone aircraft.

Yet, from his safe houses and mountain redoubts, the guerrilla commander has directed some of the most brazen attacks against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, and is now seen as one of the most dangerous warlords in the Taliban insurgency.

Sep 23, 2011

Insight – Haqqani chief: U.S. will suffer if it tries attack

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Sirajuddin Haqqani does not carry a gun or wear a turban as he moves stealthily through the Waziristan wilderness along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, hoping to avoid detection and getting hit by a U.S. missile from a drone aircraft.

Yet, from his safe houses and mountain redoubts, the guerrilla commander has directed some of the most brazen attacks against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, and is now seen as one of the most dangerous warlords in the Taliban insurgency.

Sep 23, 2011

Insight: Haqqani chief says U.S. will suffer if it tries attack

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Sirajuddin Haqqani does not carry a gun or wear a turban as he moves stealthily through the Waziristan wilderness along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, hoping to avoid detection and getting hit by a U.S. missile from a drone aircraft.

Yet, from his safe houses and mountain redoubts, the guerrilla commander has directed some of the most brazen attacks against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, and is now seen as one of the most dangerous warlords in the Taliban insurgency.

Sep 23, 2011

Insight – Haqqani chief: U.S. will suffer if it tries

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Sirajuddin Haqqani does not carry a gun or wear a turban as he moves stealthily through the Waziristan wilderness along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, hoping to avoid detection and getting hit by a U.S. missile from a drone aircraft.

Yet, from his safe houses and mountain redoubts, the guerrilla commander has directed some of the most brazen attacks against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, and is now seen as one of the most dangerous warlords in the Taliban insurgency.

Sep 23, 2011

Insight – Is Pakistan helping Haqqanis attack U.S.?

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Sirajuddin Haqqani does not carry a gun or wear a turban as he moves stealthily through the Waziristan wilderness along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, hoping to avoid detection and getting hit by a U.S. missile from a drone aircraft.

Yet, from his safe houses and mountain redoubts, the guerrilla commander has directed some of the most brazen attacks against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, and is now seen as one of the most dangerous warlords in the Taliban insurgency.

Sep 23, 2011

Is Pakistan helping Haqqanis attack US in Afghanistan?

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Sirajuddin Haqqani does not carry a gun or wear a turban as he moves stealthily through the Waziristan wilderness along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, hoping to avoid detection and getting hit by a U.S. missile from a drone aircraft.

Yet, from his safe houses and mountain redoubts, the guerrilla commander has directed some of the most brazen attacks against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, and is now seen as one of the most dangerous warlords in the Taliban insurgency.