Editor, Investment Strategy. Europe, Middle East and Africa, London
Mike's Feed
Apr 23, 2013
Apr 23, 2013
Apr 23, 2013
Apr 22, 2013
Apr 19, 2013

Yen slide echoes ’97 emerging crisis for some

LONDON, April 19 (Reuters) – While many investors have
greeted the prospect of new Japanese money flooding world
markets as a windfall, some strategists warn a sliding yen could
yet shock Asia and developing countries.

The Bank of Japan’s aggressive reinforcement of quantitative
easing and its pledge to end domestic deflation have been widely
predicted to push some Japanese investors overseas in search of
better yields.

Apr 18, 2013
via Global Investing

Weekly Radar: Second-guessing Japan flows as global growth slows

Figuring out what was driving pretty violent market moves this week was trickier than usual – and that says something about how much the herd has scattered this year, with ‘risk on-risk off’ correlations having weakened sharply. Just as everyone puzzled over a potential “wall of money” from Japan after the BOJ’s aggressive reflation efforts, the bottom seemed to fall out of gold, energy and broader commodity markets – dragging both equity markets and, unusually, peripheral euro zone bond yields lower in the process.  As dangerous as it may be to seek an overriding narrative these days, you could possibly tie all up these moves under the BOJ banner – something along these lines: the threat of a further yen losses pushes an already pumped-up US dollar ever higher across the board and undermines dollar-denominated  commodities, which have already been hampered by what looks like yet another lull in global demand. Developed market equities, whose Q1 surge had been reined in by several weeks of disappointing economic data and an iffy start to the Q1 earnings season, were then hit further by a lunge in heavy cap mining and energy stocks. The commodities hit may also help explain the persistent underperformance of emerging markets this year. What’s more the lift to Italian and Spanish government bonds comes partly from an assumption any Japanese money exit will seek U.S. and European government bonds and relatively higher-yielding euro government paper may be favoured by some over the paltry returns in the core ‘safe havens’ of Treasuries or bunds. The confidence to reach for yield has clearly risen over the past six months as wider systemic fears have receded – something underlined in dramatic style this week by a huge lunge in gold,  now lost almost 20 percent in the year to date.

While all that logic may be plausible, there have been dozens of other reasons floating around for the seemingly erratic twists and turns of the week.

Apr 18, 2013
Apr 17, 2013
Apr 17, 2013

‘Naked’ CDS ban and euro zone calm

LONDON (Reuters) – The surprising stability of euro government bonds this year owes much to the European Central Bank’s powerful pledge of support, but many wonder if regulation to limit speculation also plays a part.

European Union regulators acted last November after two years fretting about financial derivatives called sovereign credit default swaps (SCDS), insurance-like contracts offering protection against the risk governments default, and suspecting they aggravated serial euro government debt crises.

Apr 17, 2013

Analysis: “Naked” CDS ban and euro zone calm

LONDON (Reuters) – The surprising stability of euro government bonds this year owes much to the European Central Bank’s powerful pledge of support, but many wonder if regulation to limit speculation also plays a part.

European Union regulators acted last November after two years fretting about financial derivatives called sovereign credit default swaps (SCDS), insurance-like contracts offering protection against the risk governments default, and suspecting they aggravated serial euro government debt crises.

    • About Mike

      "Mike Dolan is Reuters' Investment Strategy Editor in Europe. He has been a correspondent and editor for the past 20 years, working for Reuters from London and Washington DC in a variety of roles covering global policymaking, economics and investment trends."
      Joined Reuters:
      1995
      Awards:
      Reuters Editor of the Year, 2009. Reuters multimedia journalist of the year award, 2011
    • More from Mike

    • Contact Mike

    • Follow Mike