Editor, Investment Strategy. Europe, Middle East and Africa, London
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Oct 17, 2012

Euro emigration: safety valve or debt drag?

LONDON (Reuters) – Debt-laden euro zone countries are exporting again — only this time it’s their young workers, in an exodus some fear could intensify national debt problems longer term.

As countries on the euro zone periphery endure deep and prolonged recessions, high unemployment, severe tax hikes and state spending cuts, young people appear to be taking to planes, trains and boats again in search of work.

Oct 17, 2012

Analysis: Euro emigration: safety valve or debt drag?

LONDON (Reuters) – Debt-laden euro zone countries are exporting again — only this time it’s their young workers, in an exodus some fear could intensify national debt problems longer term.

As countries on the euro zone periphery endure deep and prolonged recessions, high unemployment, severe tax hikes and state spending cuts, young people appear to be taking to planes, trains and boats again in search of work.

Oct 15, 2012

Headlong dash for “junk” raises alarm

LONDON (Reuters) – In the seemingly obsessive search for the next bubble in global markets – an understandable if hyper-sensitised reaction to missing the last one – speculative credit remains a prime suspect.

It’s been boom time again this year for what used to be known as “junk bonds”, but which now go by the more polite moniker of high-yield, speculative-grade debt – much of which is corporate borrowing.

Oct 11, 2012
via Global Investing

Weekly Radar: Q3 earnings; China GDP; EU summit; US debate

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Markets have turned glum again as October gets underway and the northern winter looms, weighed down by a relentless grind of negative commentary even if there’s been little really new information to digest. The net loss on MSCI’s world stock market index over the past seven days is a fairly restrained 1.5%, though we are now back down to early September levels. Debt markets have been better behaved. The likes of Spain’s 10-year yields are virtually unchanged over the past week amid all the rolling huff and puff from euroland. The official argument that Spain doesn’t need a bailout at these yield levels is backed up by analysis that shows even at the peak of the latest crisis in July average Spanish sovereign borrowing costs were still lower than pre-crisis days of 2006.  But with ratings downgrades still in the mix, it looks like a bit of a cat-and-mouse game for some time yet. Ten-year US Treasury yields, meantime, have nudged back higher again after the strong September US employment report and are hardly a sign of suddenly cratering world growth. What’s more, oil’s back up above $115 per barrel, with the broader CRB commodities index actually up over the past week. This contains no good news for the world, but if there are genuinely new worries about aggregate world demand, then not everyone in the commodity world has been let in on the ‘secret’ yet.

So why are we all shivering in our boots again? Perennial euro fears aside for a sec, the latest narratives go four ways at the moment. 1) The IMF’s World Economic Outlook (WEO) downgraded world growth and its Financial Stability report issued stern warnings on the extent of European bank deleveraging 2) a pretty lousy earnings season is just kicking off stateside, 3)  U.S. presidential election polls are neck and neck again and unnerving some people fearful of a clean sweep by Republicans and possible threats to the Federal Reserve’s independence and its hyper-active monetary policy 4) it’s a new quarter after a punchy Q3 and there’s not much new juice left to add to fairly hefty year-to-date gains. Maybe it’s a bit of all of the above.

Oct 10, 2012
Oct 10, 2012
Oct 9, 2012
Oct 9, 2012
Oct 9, 2012
Oct 9, 2012
via Global Investing

Euro emigration – safety valve or worker drain?

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Four years of relentless austerity in many of the euro zone’s most debt-hobbled countries have forced many of their youngest and sometimes brightest workers to grab the plane, train or boat and emigrate in search of work. For countries with a long history of emigration, such as Ireland, this is depressingly familar — coming just 20 years after the country’s last debt crisis and national belt-tightening in the 1980s crescendoed, with the exit of some 40,ooo a year in 1989/90 from a population of just 3-1/2 million people.

The intervening boom years surrounding the creation and infancy of the Europe’s single currency and expansion of the European Union eastwards saw huge net migration inflows back into the then-thriving euro zone periphery  — Ireland, Greece, Portugal, Spain and Italy — and created a virtuous circle of rising workforces, higher demand for housing/goods and rising exchequer tax receipts.

    • About Mike

      "Mike Dolan is Reuters' Investment Strategy Editor in Europe. He has been a correspondent and editor for the past 20 years, working for Reuters from London and Washington DC in a variety of roles covering global policymaking, economics and investment trends."
      Hometown:
      Tralee, Co Kerry
      Joined Reuters:
      1995
      Awards:
      Reuters Editor of the Year, 2009. Reuters multimedia journalist of the year award, 2011
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