National Security correspondent, Washington DC
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Mar 9, 2011

U.S. seeks surge success from lethal Afghan outpost

SANGIN, Afghanistan (Reuters) – Five months ago, when U.S. Marines took over this sandbagged outpost in Sangin, deep in southern Afghanistan’s Taliban country, they were pounded by insurgent fire every time they stepped foot off base.

Since Colonel Jason Morris’s Marines replaced British soldiers at Forward Operating Base Sabit Qadam last fall, 29 of his men from the Marine 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment, have been killed.

Mar 8, 2011

Karzai steps up criticism during Gates trip

KABUL (Reuters) – Afghan President Hamid Karzai stepped up criticism of Western institutions and military forces on Tuesday, accusing them of hampering his government and causing unacceptable civilian casualties.

The criticism came on the second day of a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates intended to assess security progress but clouded by Afghan anger over the mistaken killing of nine boys in a NATO air strike last week.

Mar 8, 2011

Afghan leader steps up criticism during Gates trip

KABUL (Reuters) – Afghan President Hamid Karzai stepped up criticism of Western institutions and military forces on Tuesday, accusing them of hampering his government and causing unacceptable civilian casualties.

The criticism came on the second day of a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates intended to assess security progress but clouded by Afghan anger over the mistaken killing of nine boys in a NATO air strike last week.

Mar 7, 2011

Gates says killing of Afghan boys a “setback”

KABUL (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates described the mistaken killing of nine Afghan boys by NATO aircraft as a “setback” on Monday as the issue overshadowed a visit to Afghanistan to assess security progress.

Gates met Afghan President Hamid Karzai on an unannounced trip to Kabul and repeated Washington’s apology for the killing of the boys last week by NATO helicopters, which has increased strain on an already testy relationship with Afghan leaders.

Mar 7, 2011

Casualties take focus from Gates’s Afghan trip

KABUL, March 7 (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Robert
Gates arrived in Afghanistan on Monday at a time of increased
strain between Kabul and its Western backers and with important
security transition milestones looming.

Gates, whose visit was not announced in advance, will meet
President Hamid Karzai, who complained angrily last week after
nine Afghan children were mistakenly killed by helicopters from
the NATO-led force.

Mar 7, 2011

U.S. Defence Secretary Gates lands in Afghanistan

KABUL (Reuters) – U.S. Defence Secretary Robert Gates arrived in Afghanistan on Monday at a time of increased strain between Kabul and its Western backers and with important security transition milestones looming.

Gates, whose visit was not announced in advance, will meet President Hamid Karzai, who complained angrily last week after nine Afghan children were mistakenly killed by helicopters from the NATO-led force.

Mar 7, 2011

Defense Secretary Gates lands in Afghanistan

KABUL (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates arrived in Afghanistan on Monday at a time of increased strain between Kabul and its Western backers and with important security transition milestones looming.

Gates, whose visit was not announced in advance, will meet President Hamid Karzai, who complained angrily last week after nine Afghan children were mistakenly killed by helicopters from the NATO-led force.

Mar 2, 2011

U.S. presses Gaddafi to quit, flexes military muscle

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Flexing its military muscle, the United States sent warships toward Libya on Tuesday as it sought to keep pressure on Muammar Gaddafi to relinquish his four-decade grip on power.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the United States and its NATO allies were still considering a “no-fly” zone over Libya, although military commanders warned of the peril to allied aircraft of enforcing it.

Mar 1, 2011

U.S. says will keep squeezing Gaddafi until he quits

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States will keep squeezing Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi until he quits, a top U.S. official said on Tuesday after Washington imposed sanctions and began moving warships in a show of force.

The USS Barry, a destroyer, moved through the Suez Canal on Monday and is now in the southwestern Mediterranean. Two amphibious assault ships, the USS Kearsarge, which can carry 2,000 Marines, and the USS Ponce, are in the Red Sea and now heading to the canal.

Mar 1, 2011

U.S. military action seen unlikely against Gaddafi

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. commanders moved ships and planes closer to Libya on Monday, but analysts said military action against Muammar Gaddafi was unlikely even as Washington steps up its rhetoric against the Libyan leader.

Richard Downie, a fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said past experiences in Africa, such as Somalia in the 1990s, had left Washington reluctant to engage in ground missions on the continent.

    • About Missy

      "Prior to heading the Mexico bureau, Missy was deputy bureau chief in Baghdad. She has also covered commodities in Washington, DC and worked in Peru, Argentina and Egypt for Reuters."
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