National Security correspondent, Washington DC
Missy's Feed
Mar 21, 2011

West keeps distance from Libya rebels, strikes go on

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Pentagon on Monday said Western strikes had crippled Muammar Gaddafi’s military might, but signaled it would keep Libyan rebels at arm’s length as it seeks to avoid getting mired in a messy civil conflict.

General Carter Ham, the U.S. commander leading a multinational coalition against the Libyan leader, said three days of air and missile strikes had set the stage for a broad no-fly zone stretching across most of northern Libya.

Mar 20, 2011

Pentagon says strikes crippled Libya air capability

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Western strikes on Libyan air defenses over the past two days had crippled Muammar Gaddafi’s capability to launch airplanes and detect foreign aircraft, a senior U.S. military official said on Sunday.

“We judge these strikes to have been very effective in significantly degrading the regime’s air defense capability,” Vice Admiral Bill Gortney, director of the U.S. military’s Joint Staff, told reporters at the Pentagon.

Mar 20, 2011

Obama says U.S. role limited as Libya strikes start

BRASILIA/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. forces led the biggest military intervention in the Arab world since the invasion of Iraq on Saturday, but President Barack Obama insisted that U.S. involvement would be limited as part of an international effort to protect Libyan civilians.

The United States, France, Britain, Canada and Italy began attacks on targets designed to cripple Muammar Gaddafi’s air defenses as the West tries to force the Libyan leader from power. At least some Arab nations are expected to join the coalition.

Mar 19, 2011

Obama stresses limited role as air strikes start

BRASILIA/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. forces joined those of four other countries in launching strikes against Libya on Saturday and President Barack Obama insisted U.S. involvement was limited and only in support of an international effort.

The United States, France, Britain, Canada and Italy began attacks on targets designed to cripple Muammar Gaddafi’s air defences as the West tries to force the Libyan leader from power. At least some Arab nations are expected to join the coalition.

Mar 19, 2011

U.S. says five-nation coalition launched Libya strikes

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. and British ships and submarines launched missile strikes against Libya on Saturday, officials said, as the West began a first phase of its military operations to force Muammar Gaddafi from power.

Vice Admiral Bill Gortney, director of the U.S. military’s Joint Staff, said over 110 Tomahawk cruise missiles had struck more than 20 Libyan air defence sites starting at 1500 EST/1900

Mar 19, 2011

U.S. stresses supporting role as air strikes start in Libya

BRASILIA/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. forces joined those of four other countries in launching military action against Libya on Saturday, and President Barack Obama said U.S. involvement was limited and only in support of an international effort.

The United States, France, Britain, Canada and Italy began launching strikes designed to cripple Muammar Gaddafi’s air defenses, as the West tries to force the Libyan leader from power. At least some Arab nations are expected to join the coalition later.

Mar 18, 2011

U.S. military hopes deterrence succeeds in Libya

WASHINGTON, March 18 (Reuters) – The Pentagon, skeptical of
military action in Libya, may be hoping an aggressive posture
and threats of air strikes will be enough to change Muammar
Gaddafi’s calculus and avoid dragging already stretched U.S.
forces in another war.

Former officials and analysts said the U.S. military may be
betting that U.N. backing of a no-fly zone, perhaps combined
with limited air or missile strikes, will induce Gaddafi to
stop his forces from attacking civilians without requiring
further military action.

Mar 16, 2011

CIA denouement likely to leave scars for US, Pakistan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – CIA contractor Raymond Davis may no longer be locked in a Pakistani jail, but the diplomatic storm unleashed by his arrest will likely leave scars on a fragile relationship central to U.S. security.

A Pakistani court acquitted Davis, who shot and killed two men in the Pakistani city of Lahore on Jan. 27 in what he said was a robbery attempt, of murder charges and released him on Wednesday after what some officials said was a deal that involved paying “blood money” to the victims’ families.

Mar 16, 2011

Analysis:CIA denouement likely to leave scars for U.S., Pakistan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – CIA contractor Raymond Davis may no longer be locked in a Pakistani jail, but the diplomatic storm unleashed by his arrest will likely leave scars on a fragile relationship central to U.S. security.

A Pakistani court acquitted Davis, who shot and killed two men in the Pakistani city of Lahore on January 27 in what he said was a robbery attempt, of murder charges and released him on Wednesday after what some officials said was a deal that involved paying “blood money” to the victims’ families.

Mar 15, 2011

Petraeus: tough spring ahead, but Afghan drawdown on

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan delivered an optimistic assessment of the unpopular war on Tuesday, telling lawmakers his troops will continue to make headway against Taliban insurgents even with a drawdown of American troops set to begin in July.

General David Petraeus, in his first congressional testimony since becoming Afghanistan commander last year, reiterated the Pentagon’s message that President Barack Obama’s decision to deploy an extra 30,000 troops succeeded in winning key territory away from the Taliban.

    • About Missy

      "Prior to heading the Mexico bureau, Missy was deputy bureau chief in Baghdad. She has also covered commodities in Washington, DC and worked in Peru, Argentina and Egypt for Reuters."
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