Opinion

Mohamed El-Erian

“Made in Egypt, by Egypt, for Egypt”

Mohamed El-Erian
Jun 29, 2011 20:39 UTC

It is a great pleasure to be with you today. I would like to express my deep appreciation to the Board of Trustees of the American University in Cairo … and extend my immense congratulations to AUC’s graduating class of 2011.

At this time, and more than ever, AUC and other centers of learning in Egypt occupy a very important position in a country that is in the midst of historic transformations. In today’s Egypt, universities are — and should be — much more than centers of learning. They are critical facilitators of beneficial change for millions of Egyptians; for current and for future generations; and for the well-being of a country, a region, and a global system.

People look to our centers of learning for education and thought leadership. They look to them for guidance in navigating complex economic, institutional, political, and social transformations. And they look for them to develop the future leaders of society at every level.

All this gives our centers of learning a critical role in Egypt’s already rich and inspiring history. It is a privilege for AUC and other universities in Egypt. It is also a huge responsibility.

I have no doubt that, with sustained effort and steadfast commitment, you will deliver; and do with pride and excellence.

from The Great Debate:

An Egyptian song for all

Mohamed El-Erian
Mar 8, 2011 17:00 UTC

By Mohamed A. El-Erian
El-Erian is the CEO of PIMCO. He spent part of his childhood in Egypt where his father was a professor of international law at Cairo University and then served as an Egyptian diplomat and was elected to the International Court of Justice in 1978. The opinions expressed are his own.

For centuries, songs have provided populist narratives of historical movements. And, every once in a while, a song comes along that also succeeds in capturing forcefully the raw emotions of the moment. This is the case today with "Sout el Horeya," or the "Voice of Freedom," sung by Hany Adel and Amir Eid.

Coming out of Egypt, this song skillfully encapsulates the strong drivers behind the ongoing transformations impacting the Middle East and North Africa. It is a "must hear" for all those trying to understand previously-unthinkable developments in the region, including western governments whose sophisticated intelligence services have been caught flat-footed and are now playing rapid catch up.

from The Great Debate:

Resetting Egypt’s economy

Mohamed El-Erian
Feb 9, 2011 17:59 UTC

EGYPT/

By Mohamed A. El-Erian
El-Erian is the CEO of PIMCO. He spent part of his childhood in Egypt where his father was a professor of international law at Cairo University and then served as an Egyptian diplomat and was elected to the International Court of Justice in 1978. The opinions expressed are his own.

While Egyptians are yet to specify the final destination for their revolution -- and only they can, and should do so -- there is little doubt in my mind that the country is now on a new, bold and uncertain road toward greater democracy and individual freedoms. The next few days and weeks will be critical in determining the journey for a country that is central to the stability of the Middle East.

Undoubtedly, domestic political developments hold the key to what will happen. Egyptians need to converge on a common understanding and vision of "managed change". And this vision must satisfy the millions of Egyptians -- from all ages, religions and walks of life -- that unite in Tahrir (Liberation) Square and elsewhere to better influence and improve their destiny.

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