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from India Insight:

Understanding the repo rate, cash reserve ratio and the Reserve Bank of India

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The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) on Tuesday cut the repo rate as well as the cash reserve ratio (CRR) by 25 basis points, or 0.25 percent. Here's a quick explanation of what that means. It will be obvious to some readers, but many people haven't studied economics and are unfamiliar with the terms.

The repo rate, which now stands at 7.75 percent, is the rate at which the central bank lends money to Indian banks. As the repo rate goes down, it gets cheaper for banks to borrow money. That makes it easier for people to borrow money at cheaper rates too. As more people borrow money, which ought to be the result of action like this, they'll spend more money. That's good for the Indian economy.

The CRR, meanwhile, is the amount of funds banks must keep with the RBI. The CRR is at 4 percent, which means for every 100 rupees, the bank keeps 4 rupees with the RBI in cash. The ratio indicates the policy stance of the bank and is used as a tool to manage liquidity, or the amount of money in the system. By changing this ratio, the central bank can control the amount of liquidity. Tuesday's cut would release 180 billion rupees (or about $3.35 billion) into the system, meaning banks would have more money to lend to borrowers.

Cutting the repo rate doesn't always cut lending rates, of course. Banks might worry that lower lending rates could hurt their profits. However, IDBI Bank cut its base rate after the RBI announcement, and the head of India’s top lender, State Bank of India, said banks likely will cut lending rates.

from India Insight:

It’s time India bites the diesel bullet

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"81 rupees?" asked an astonished TV anchor when an irate Bengaluru-based consumer called in after the recent 7.5-rupee hike in petrol prices. Perhaps cars that run on milk are now needed, the anchor suggested -- when the caller said the dairy product costs around 30 rupees a litre.

While milk-powered automobiles might be a distant dream, the reality remains that those relying on petrol vehicles will now need to do their budgeting again. If a falling rupee and high inflation were not enough, this steepest-ever rise in petrol prices will surely pinch.

Why should the government control inflation?

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INDIA-ECONOMY/FINMIN

The ‘reform agenda’ understood as ‘market-oriented reform’ or giving more space to market mechanism in food and fuel economy seems to have been held up.

The government can not be seen to be doing away with subsidies just as prices are up. Its hand is stayed for now.

Sensex closes above 15000

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The BSE Sensex seesawed today, erasing early losses of as much as 1.8 percent, and finally closed above the 15,000 mark on hopes of a revival in the economy. Higher European markets also helped lift investor sentiments.

The 30-share sensitive index of the Bombay Stock Exchange swung from an intra-day low of 14,601 to an intra-day high of 15,026, and finally closed 137 points up at 15,008. The fifty-share Nifty ended 0.93 percent up at 4572.INDIA-STOCKS/JUMP

Sensex at 9-mth high; investors cheer econ data

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The BSE Sensex traded firm on Monday as investors cheered improved manufacturing data at home and signs of recovery in the global economy.

The benchmark stayed mostly in positive territory, touching an intra-day high of 14,906 and finally closing 215 points higher at 14,840 – its highest close in almost nine months. The fifty-share Nifty ended 1.8 percent higher at 4529.

Market rises on short covering

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INDIA-BUDGETThe good times continue for the market. The benchmark extended its rally on Thursday and ended 186 points up as investors covered short positions on the last date of derivatives expiry.

Engineering firm L&T beat forecast with strong quarterly numbers. Its shares closed 2.3 percent up.

Sensex falls as post-poll euphoria begins to fade

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The stock market was volatile today as profit taking continued for the second day after a two-day post election rally. Weak Asian markets too weighed on investor sentiments.

The Sensex moved mostly in negative territory throughout trade, turning positive briefly after touching an intra-day low of 13,704.43 points and then shifted back to the red. The benchmark closed 324.12 points down at 13,736.54, while the Nifty ended 59.40 points lower at 4,210.90.
INDIAThe main contributors to the benchmark’s fall were L&T, ICICI Bank, HDFC and Reliance Industries.

Sensex closes lower on profit booking

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The BSE Sensex closed 1.9 percent lower on Friday but posted ninth consecutive weekly rise as investors turned net sellers from net buyers. MARKETS-SOUTHASIA-STOCKS/

The benchmark closed down 240.51 points at 11,876.43, while the Nifty ended 1.7 percent down at 3,620.70.

Sensex rises amid choppy trade

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The Sensex seesawed in early trade today but managed to close 0.57 percent higher, tracking gains in Asian and European markets.

The benchmark closed 61 points up at 10,803.86, with investors locking in gains ahead of the earnings season and national elections.MARKETS SOUTHASIA STOCKS

Reliance leads Sensex rally

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The BSE Sensex today crossed the psychological mark of 10,000 and ended 446 points higher, its best close in nearly five months, guided by strong Asian and European markets.

The benchmark index ended at 10,348.83, while the 50-share Nifty ended 150.7 points higher at 3,211.05.
INDIA
Reliance Industries surged more than 5 per cent on reports the company has started pumping gas from the KG basin, which at full throttle will nearly double India’s gas output.

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