Muniland holds steady

By Cate Long
September 20, 2011

Municipal bond ownership has remained relatively steady over the past year, according to the Federal Reserve’s latest Flow of Funds data, which was released yesterday (Fed’s L.211 Municipal Securities and Loans page 92). The data paints a different picture than the one we typically hear from the media of large outflows from retail investors and mutual funds following Meredith Whitney’s prediction of massive municipal defaults. Essentially the whole municipal bond market has increased slightly in size, growing from $2.842 trillion in 2Q 2010 to $2.886 trillion in 2Q 2011. Ownership for all categories has remained pretty steady.

Municipal bonds are not just for rich people

By Cate Long
September 16, 2011

This Bloomberg interview with John Miller, co-head of fixed-income at Nuveen Asset Management, is a good overview of the current state of muniland although I disagree with his comment that “many, if not most municipal bond holders are in the highest tax bracket”.

Supporting less prosperous brethren

By Cate Long
July 29, 2011

There are many financial linkages between various levels of government in muniland but everyone eventually has to stand on their own. It’s like the cousin you grew up with but don’t see much now other than holidays. When your cousin loses their job and their mortgage is being foreclosed you want to help but in a limited way. You want the cousin to get a job and cut a deal on their mortgage or do a short sale. You don’t want them moving into your home or having access to your bank account. It’s the same between the federal, state and local governments. They are cousins. But not that close.

The middle sadness

By Cate Long
July 29, 2011

The middle sadness

Paul Mason, the economics editor of the BBC’s Newsnight program, recently retraced John Steinbeck’s footsteps during America’s Great Depression.  What he found was a broad swath of sadness as he observed many citizens who have lost jobs and homes. It’s the invisible America. From the BBC:

Continuing wills for the United States?

By Cate Long
July 28, 2011

The theatrics in Congress concerning the debt ceiling, now in their seventh month, have sent increasingly strong shock waves throughout the U.S. and global financial systems. The debt ceiling is the legislatively-imposed limit for the nation to issue debt to fund its activities. It’s been stalled at the same level of $14.3 trillion since May 16. The U.S. Treasury has been scrambling to find extra monies, including borrowing internally from the federal government workers’ pension plans, so that they can continue to pay the nation’s obligations. They say the cash drawer is near empty.

Markets hold the whip, but are they rational?

By Cate Long
July 27, 2011

There has been a lot of discussion over the past few days about whether the United States deserves a triple-A rating. The weak and meandering attempts of the Congressional leadership and President Obama to reach a consensus on raising the debt ceiling has prompted this storm of confusion. The political theater is painful.

Relying on the rich uncle

By Cate Long
July 6, 2011

State and local governments earn their “wages” primarily by collecting taxes, although states get significant “flow-throughs” from the federal government for Medicaid and other social entitlements. Every state varies in where they draw tax revenues from. For example, states that are highly dependent on tourism will see substantial revenues from hotel and sales taxes.

“To win the future, we must dream big and build big”

By Cate Long
June 30, 2011

America’s Interstate Highway System celebrates 55 years

This is the best example of how public infrastructure can really anchor tremendous economic growth. We can learn from history and use this time of economic challenge to conceive of equally profound infrastructure goals. From Fastlane, the blog of U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood:

The global spiderweb of debt

By Cate Long
June 27, 2011

If you are not familiar with the municipal bond market, you may think that muniland is nothing more than states, municipalities and school districts offering plain bonds that mature on a set date and offer a fixed interest rate. That is the textbook description.

Is the taxpayer backstop the root of pension problems?

By Cate Long
June 21, 2011

Public workers have been protesting against the reduction of their benefits in several states. It got a more than a little testy in Wisconsin this winter, which has led to several recall elections for legislators there.