America’s unstable road funding

By Cate Long
June 25, 2014

Congress General Fund

The national account to fund America’s highway construction and other transportation is nearly empty. The revenues that go into the Highway Trust Fund, which come from a federal 18.4 cent per gallon tax on gasoline, are expected to dip below $4 billion in July. Congress has transferred monies from the general fund in four of the past five years (the yellow stars above) into the Highway Trust to make up for the shortfall from the fuel tax.

The Senate’s latest twist: The American Infrastructure Fund

By Cate Long
January 27, 2014

A bipartisan group of eleven U.S. Senators, led by Colorado Democrat Michael Bennet, has filed legislation to create the American Infrastructure Fund. Senate bill 1957 would:

A focus on infrastructure in the U.K.

By Cate Long
December 10, 2013

The United Kingdom created an independent group, U.K. Infrastructure, to track, coordinate and promote infrastructure investment in the country. It announced its latest plan last week:

Infrastructure requires funding; Where will it come from?

By Cate Long
November 1, 2013

Twitter was abuzz over a chart that was posted on FT’s Alphaville. Quack, quack, quack went Twitter, we need infrastructure spending to boost the economy! Of course nobody mentioned that Republicans, who recently shut down Congress to prove a point, are loath to increase spending. So where could additional money for infrastructure spending come from?

Infrastructure land

By Cate Long
June 6, 2013

The New York State Comptroller, Tom DeNapoli, issued a new report this month that discusses public private partnerships (P3s) and makes recommendations for municipal entities that are considering P3s for infrastructure projects. The report seems to be directed at the New York State Assembly, which had legislation that would have authorized P3s in the state without any limit on size or requirement for oversight. From the report:

More bridges, less war spending for America

By Cate Long
May 24, 2013

Moderating the infrastructure debate

By Cate Long
April 4, 2013

New York’s mayor Michael Bloomberg has a reputation as a data junkie who uses statistics to manage the city more efficiently. I think I found his doppelganger in Michigan’s governor Rick Snyder. Fitch recently bumped Michigan’s rating to AA from AA-, where it had been since 2007. Bloomberg and Snyder may be national models for the effective use of data at the local, state and federal levels.

Infrastructure must be part of the agenda

By Cate Long
February 13, 2013

The need for more infrastructure must be brought back to center stage. Creating middle-class jobs “must be the North Star that guides our efforts,” President Obama said in his State of the Union address on Tuesday. More improved bridges, tunnels, ports and other shared infrastructure would be a great way to boost the economy, create jobs and improve the hard assets that support business and public activities.

Raise the federal gas tax

By Cate Long
February 5, 2013

Members of Congress approved spending $198 billion during fiscal years 2012 and 2013 on the war in Afghanistan, according to the Center for Strategic and International Studies. In contrast, in fiscal year 2012, Congress allocated only $37 billion to the Federal Highway Administration for transportation infrastructure. About $23 billion of this spending on highways, bridges and mass transit comes from the 18.4 cents of federal tax Americans pay on a gallon of gasoline. This tax – instituted in 1993 – has not been adjusted (even for inflation) since it was put in place. From McClatchy:

Get ready for more public toll bridges and roads

By Cate Long
December 13, 2012

Governor John Kasich of Ohio and Governor Steve Beshear of Kentucky are forming a bi-state team to research funding options to replace the 50 year-old bridge that crosses the Ohio River and connects their states. The Brent Spence Bridge carries about double the volume it was designed for on Interstate 71. It is an example of valuable U.S. infrastructure in need of replacement. The big question is where the funds will come from. AP has the story: