The false equivalence of credit ratings

By Cate Long
July 15, 2014

In a new report, Janney Capital Markets analyst Tom Kozlik calls out Standard & Poor’s for credit ratings on local governments that he says are too liberal. Kozlik claims that S&P is inflating ratings. I think his analysis is solid, but inconclusive given the size of his claim. Kozlik opens the door to more critical analysis of the comparability of ratings.

The ‘new stable’ for local governments

By Cate Long
December 12, 2013

Moody’s Ratings made a big sector call last week in its U.S. Public Finance outlook:

Moody’s flawed estimate on public pension liabilities

By Cate Long
June 28, 2013

As the debate continues over public pension funding levels, we have this headline from the Financial Times this week: “US States need $980 billion to fill pension gap, says Moody’s.” This is not exactly news. A number of studies, including ones from the Pew Trust and the Public Fund Survey, have identified a massive shortfall for public pension funds. In fact, the Pew Trust said that the shortfall in 2010 was $1.38 trillion, so perhaps we should be applauding state legislatures for improving the gap since then.

Moody’s provides criteria for U.S. Triple-A rating

By Cate Long
February 19, 2013

The credit rating agency Moody’s is in a very delicate position. Its arch rival, Standard & Poor’s, was recently charged by the U.S. Department of Justice alleging that S&P committed mail and wire fraud by defrauding investors with faulty ratings. Moody’s was not charged, but there are a lot of questions about why it was left out of the investigation. At the same time, Moody’s is responsible for judging the creditworthiness of the U.S. government’s debt. There is little wonder that the rating agency is being very transparent in the benchmarks it is using.

The downgrade grinder continues at Moody’s

By Cate Long
October 26, 2012

Moody’s released a summary of its third-quarter rating actions today and the downgrade grinder continues to turn in muniland. Downgrades across U.S. public finance sectors totaled about $75 billion in the third quarter of 2012, with four issuers accounting for over 70% of the debt downgraded: The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey,  the Puerto Rico Sales Tax Financing Corporation, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Chicago O’Hare Airport Enterprise.

Danville’s AAA disclosure

By Cate Long
October 12, 2012

One of the most common complaints in muniland is over a lack of disclosure. Public officials often say too little too late about fiscal matters. That is why it was a pleasant surprise to come across the proactive response of Joseph Calabrigo, the town manager of Danville, California, to Moody’s announcement that it is reviewing credit ratings associated with lease-backed and/or general obligation debts issued by 32 cities in California.

Moody’s muniland blacklist

By Cate Long
July 19, 2012

Moody’s this week published a Special Comment (subscription required) that crystallizes a lot of the discussion regarding bankruptcies and defaults that has been going around muniland lately:

The birds’-eye view of muniland

By Cate Long
March 14, 2012

My Thomson Reuters colleague at Municipal Market Data, Daniel Berger, published an excellent report on the debt of the 40 poorest U.S. cities. His work is exclusively for MMD subscribers, but I excerpted the high-level part where he summarizes the general view the credit rating agencies have about municipalities. Here is what Dan had to say:

Cutting the ratings agencies the tiniest bit of slack

By Cate Long
November 1, 2011

After polluting the global financial system with hundreds of billions of dollars of overrated mortgage-backed securities and helping bring down the world economy, the credit rating agencies have been struggling mightily to repair their reputations. It’s been an uphill climb, and they were dealt another blow on Friday when a Bloomberg piece detailed academic research showing how fees influenced the assignment of higher ratings. Municipal issuers got the harshest ratings because they paid the lowest fees, according to the article.

Does a downgrade cost anything?

By Cate Long
August 19, 2011

The debt of the United States was downgraded by Standard & Poor’s several weeks ago, but the price of U.S. Treasuries have skyrocketed since then. This confuses many people because a baseline relationship in the fixed-income markets is that lower-rated, less-creditworthy bonds will be relatively cheap and investors will demand higher interest rates to compensate for additional risk.