Another tool to make people more comfortable

By Cate Long
June 11, 2014

Big data improvements at the MSRB

By Cate Long
June 10, 2014

The fine folks at the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board, led by director of product management Justin Pica, have launched some fantastic improvements for the MSRB’s market data and bond document platform EMMA.

The SEC’s new municipal adviser rule is not confusing

By Cate Long
February 27, 2014

Governing.com ran a story titled “Why’s the SEC’s New Municipal Advisor Rule So Confusing?” Actually the new rule, although not yet finalized, is not confusing. There are resources for muniland participants to understand how it will be implemented and what responsibilities muni advisors have towards their clients. In fact, I have never seen a better rollout for a new regulatory effort.

Cheers to the MSRB

By Cate Long
January 10, 2014

The Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board made a wonderful regulatory push when it issued its proposed rule for the conduct of municipal advisers. Municipal advisers are professionals who are supposed to help state and local governments structure their borrowing and investment activities in the most economically efficient way.

Diluting the MSRB

By Cate Long
August 20, 2013

Muniland’s overseer, the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board, has a big job keeping the $3.7 trillion municipal bond market in order. The MSRB was first authorized by Congress in 1975 and mandated to have 5 securities firms, 5 bank dealers and 5 public members. It was nonetheless dominated by the views of bank and dealer members, rarely undertaking investor protection initiatives. There was minimal oversight of municipal bond trading and underwriting practices as dealer banks were steering the ship.

Muniland, meet your issuers

By Cate Long
August 15, 2013

Muniland’s regulator hard at work

By Cate Long
July 26, 2013

I heard an economics editor give an amusing response the other day when asked if the U.S. has “free” markets. She responded that, since all markets are regulated, that, pretty much, yes. I had to chuckle because municipal bond markets, although regulated reasonably-well on the primary side when bonds are issued, have minimal supervision or regulation on the secondary or trading side after bonds have been issued. It’s difficult to have confidence that investors are always protected when you read stories about abuses like excessive mark-ups, for example.

Building a new municipal bond market

By Cate Long
October 25, 2012

When FIX – the industry electronic trading standard – was fleshed out for fixed income in 2003, municipal bonds were incorporated. I got a fresh look at FIX at the FIX Protocol Americas Trading Conference this week. All the major muniland alternative trading systems (ATS)  including Bonddesk, MuniCenter and Tradeweb, as well as the major dealers are already FIX compliant for the latest 4.4 version.

Make way for new muniland disclosure and market structure

By Cate Long
August 1, 2012

The SEC released its long-awaited report on muniland disclosure and price transparency yesterday. Ten years from now, every retail investor will want to say a word of thanks to Commissioner Elisse Walter, even if only half her recommendations on transparency and investor protection are implemented. Unfortunately, her term as SEC commissioner expires June 5, 2013, which leaves her less than a year to get the ball rolling on her proposals.

Examining muniland’s indices after the Libor scandal

By Cate Long
July 30, 2012

The muni market’s overseer, the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB), is taking aggressive action to survey muniland indices following the Libor scandal. The board is asking index providers to disclose more about how certain indices are developed. The MSRB has no direct authority to regulate indices because, as with Libor, they are maintained by private companies and are outside of the board’s legislative mandate to regulate dealers. Alan Polsky, the current chairman of the MSRB, said in a press call that the board did not believe that there was any wrongdoing in this corner of the market, but that increasing transparency would enhance investor confidence. Here’s what he stated in a press release: