Some interesting municipal bond trading data

By Cate Long
May 4, 2012

A few times a year, the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board releases its trade data, giving the rest of us a chance to peer into the murky municipal bond market. Yesterday, we got access to the data for the first quarter of 2012, and a few interesting facts jumped out.

End municipal tax exemptions for private projects

By Cate Long
February 29, 2012

There is a very blurry line in muniland between truly public activities and private activities that allegedly have some public good, and into this ill-defined space, for-profit and non-profit organizations have found ways to issue tax-exempt municipal bonds. This gray area should be a prime target for Congress to examine when it goes looking for ways to raise more tax revenue from muniland.

Can revenue bondholders relax now?

By Cate Long
January 9, 2012

Bond markets generally focus on who has rights to specific cash flows and control over assets. That was what Alabama federal bankruptcy court Judge Thomas Bennett was addressing when he issued an opinion Friday afternoon covering the insolvent Jefferson County sewer system.

Getting paid for municipal risk

By Cate Long
December 6, 2011

Another great chart popped up on Twitter today that shows the historical performance of the two primary types of municipal bonds: general obligation (GO) and revenue. The Bloomberg chart maps the difference in yield between these two categories, which have different legal rights to public revenues. Generally, revenue bonds pay more interest than GO bonds because they only have access to the revenue of the project that issues them. GO bonds (the white line in the Bloomberg chart) are currently trading at an average of 4.12 percent annual interest; revenue bonds (the orange line) are trading at an average of 5.09 percent at present.

Muni sweeps: Muniland reins in the borrowing

By Cate Long
June 14, 2011


Excellent chart from Barry Ritholtz’s The Big Picture. He uses data from the Federal Reserve’s Flow of Funds Accounts to map credit flows. State and local governments have become negative borrowers in the first quarter as the amount of bonds that have matured and the amount of principal that has been repaid exceeded new bond issuance. States and municipalities are making the hard fiscal choices and restraining borrowing and expenditures. It’s painful, but it must be done.

The municipality of Exxon

By Cate Long
May 12, 2011

Exxon Mobil is the third largest corporation in the world with 2010 revenues of $284 billion $383 billion and profits of $19 billion $30 billion. According to their 2010 annual report, they have returned $154 billion to their shareholders over the last five years through dividends and stock repurchases. (Exxon 2010 annual report -  page 14)