The SEC’s startling refresher on due diligence

By Cate Long
March 20, 2012

The SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations, muniland’s uber-regulator, issued a “Risk Alert” yesterday directed at underwriters of municipal bond offerings. The alert basically said: If you offer new bonds for sale, you must perform due diligence on the issuer. And you better document what you did.

Troubles in Volcker land?

By Cate Long
March 7, 2012

My post last week about ditching the Volcker Rule and returning to some form of Glass-Steagall got a lot of positive responses. Back then I wrote that the Volcker Rule, which requires regulators to cleave risky trading for a bank’s house account from deposits insured by the FDIC, is immensely complex and that it will never be properly defined or enforced. Several regulators in the past week have agonized publicly over the need to get the rule “right.”

Forget Volcker — bring back Glass-Steagall

By Cate Long
March 1, 2012

Imagine you are a financial regulator whose agency is underfunded, understaffed and under-trained and that firms under your jurisdiction are likely to pick off your best employees by offering them triple the salary you pay them.

Lessons from MF Global

By Cate Long
December 16, 2011

The October bankruptcy of MF Global has been the subject of several Congressional hearings recently. 38,000 MF Global clients lost $1.2 billion in the collapse, and numerous regulators, as well as the Department of Justice, have been trying to unravel hundreds of thousands of transactions to discover how this client money disappeared. Weeks later, it’s still unknown whether clients will have their funds returned or whether any laws were broken. What is certain, though, is that even after the passage of Dodd-Frank, our regulatory system has large supervisory gaps.

Cutting the ratings agencies the tiniest bit of slack

By Cate Long
November 1, 2011

After polluting the global financial system with hundreds of billions of dollars of overrated mortgage-backed securities and helping bring down the world economy, the credit rating agencies have been struggling mightily to repair their reputations. It’s been an uphill climb, and they were dealt another blow on Friday when a Bloomberg piece detailed academic research showing how fees influenced the assignment of higher ratings. Municipal issuers got the harshest ratings because they paid the lowest fees, according to the article.

Untimely data will cost muniland potential investors

By Cate Long
October 8, 2011

If municipal bonds lose their tax-exempt status, as some in the corridors of power in Washington are suggesting, municipalities will increasingly be competing with corporations for investors. As this competition intensifies, municipalities with poor accounting and disclosure practices could find it difficult attracting capital.

Disclosure is the beat

By Cate Long
September 28, 2011

Disclosure is the beat

On Tuesday at the SIFMA Muni Bond Summit in New York, much of the discussion by bond market participants related to transparency and disclosure issues. A lot of this was in response to new requirements in Dodd-Frank, but there was also an acknowledgement that many problems in the crisis of 2007-2009 came from a lack of information and data in many parts of the market. For example small municipal issuers had more trouble accessing the bond market to issue new bonds if their public reporting was deficient or out of date.

The gusher of municipal bond information

By Cate Long
August 29, 2011

The municipal bond market is often thought of as complex and murky. This is understandable; after all, there are over 50,000 issuers of bonds and a million plus specific municipal-bond issues. It’s staggering to imagine so many different securities.

The middle sadness

By Cate Long
July 29, 2011

The middle sadness

Paul Mason, the economics editor of the BBC’s Newsnight program, recently retraced John Steinbeck’s footsteps during America’s Great Depression.  What he found was a broad swath of sadness as he observed many citizens who have lost jobs and homes. It’s the invisible America. From the BBC:

Singing the passion song

By Cate Long
July 22, 2011

Singing the passion song

Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the former lieutenant governor of Maryland, writes passionately in The Atlantic about the need to create jobs in the United States, especially those linked to infrastructure. I welcome her opinion as we need more passionate voices drawing attention to the need to stop outsourcing American jobs. We will never recover if we make economic decisions solely on the the basis of manufacturing costs. Ms. Townsend says: