Comments on: The Oscars: Reflections of America http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/ Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:47:54 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: paintcan http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1197 Sun, 28 Jul 2013 17:31:47 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1197 @Gargan – If you really want to get cranky, you can find critics of your icons just as easily as you dismissed the three producers of “offal” you name. Marl Twain was a very “popular” or “populist” writer. And many people condemned James Joyce only for the fact that he used “vulgar” or “obscene” language.

With the arts it’s always chacun a son gout. If collectors collect it, watch it or read it and the intelligentsia still agree or haven’t responded to another social change of fashion or need, and the museums of the future don’t relegate it to the basement or sale, it tends to be considered good and even “great” art. But some collections from the 19th century were, until the recent the lush art market, relegated to basement storage. The market for antiques has a way of reeducating and conditioning things the past used to despise. The fact that so much art is older now simply because it was valuable enough to save and not discard means they will be finding forgotten “ masterpieces” till donors run out of funds to buy them for them.

It is also hard to despise the blockbusters when the museums of the earth collect things that are precious either because of the value of time and materials that went into them, are indicative of a school of thought or regional culture or were made by famous craftsmen and artists, or were once owned by famous people (among other reasons I can’t quite describe in a few words). All the arts were a business, even the people who made religious icons were paid and some were paid handsomely.

Looking at art is something like a tale I once saw on TV when I was a very small child – not more than 3 or 4, I think.

It told the Persian story of a king who made a wish to a magical deer. The deer granted him his wish that she would fill his palace with gold but that he must never say “enough” or it would all turn to mud. Needless to say, the deer filled the palace to the ceilings and the king cried “enough” and was buried in mud.

What’s wrong with the arts? Just don’t expect them to be something they are not and don’t ever worship it or the makers or you will, sooner or later, feel like the fool you really are for doing so. Prizes and awards are popularity contests most of all. How prizes are awarded and what factors influence those decisions can be a very painful and scandalous discussion.

]]>
By: renumeratedfrog http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1174 Thu, 25 Jul 2013 03:39:42 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1174 Americans view themselves the same way a teenage boy sees himself… A hero in a fantasy land who destroys the evil, while being himself perfectly good. Only later on he realizes that stupidly naive he really was… I give America at least 50 more years for that.

]]>
By: gargan http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1155 Mon, 22 Jul 2013 06:40:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1155 That these drug-addled, high-school drop-out Hollywood “auteurs” carefully crafted subtly-nuanced video-poems that reflect 21st Century America is lunacy. Harvey Weinstein AIN’T Proust; James Cameron AIN’T James Joyce; and Michael Eisner AIN’T Mark Twain—they are just street hustlers, seeking the quick buck—and, if they can disguise their offal as “art”, so much the better!

]]>
By: paintcan http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1139 Tue, 16 Jul 2013 16:30:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1139 This article has been sitting on the front page for months. It’s the only Reuters article that has ever sat for months as far as I know and in the years I’ve been reading this site.

As long as that’s the case, I have to change a mangled sentence in the first comment – it should have been “the breath of angels”.

BTW – what is it about this article that merits front-page position for months? The Oscars are long past and even the movies may have become distant memories for many. It already feels like I saw Lincoln years ago but it was only last Christmas.

@SanPa – Brokeback Mountain deserved its rewards. It was very “true to life” and you may not like the subject, but the presentation of the story was impeccable and it was far too realistic to be a piece of “gay propaganda”. It was almost too honest and embarrassing to watch.

Love and the physiological equipment do not necessarily agree with each other. And in the modern world there seems to be very little reason why they have to anymore and there is enormous economic pressure to ensure that the “normal” route to another generation will become more and more expensive with each passing decade. If all you saw in Brokeback Mountain was a gay flick you didn’t see the movie or understand most of the telling details surrounding the main story.

BTW – where is that mythical “republic” of Texas? Do any but the naive and hopelessly provincial really believe it exists?

]]>
By: SanPa http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1101 Mon, 08 Jul 2013 14:46:21 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1101 If the Oscar for “Brokeback Mountain” was a reflection of America, then I live in the Republic of Texas.

]]>
By: pskopat http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1070 Sat, 29 Jun 2013 22:53:22 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1070 Ben Affleck is very new so maybe that’s why his movie won. It was not the best movie in any sense. We expect greatness from Spielberg and we get it, but where’s the discussion of impeachable offenses. He lied to congress and if he were alive today, he’d have kicked out of office. Obama haters look for the smallest wrong to attack him but using their standard, none of our greats would have been great.

]]>
By: Ghostdog http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1067 Thu, 27 Jun 2013 13:27:27 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1067 From top to bottom scraper…

ZDT: A Sisyphusian journey in that it doesnt take us anywhere except back to the poorer parts of her superior “The Hurt Locker”. The talented Jessica Chastain is wasted here. Nothing new to see and the cinema verite is getting tired, kathryn.

Lincoln: It starts with a simply atrocious scene in which weary Union soldiers, both white and black, recite the Gettysburg Address for their visiting commander in chief. The treacle is so think you can’t even cut it with a knife which is typical of all Speilberg fare sans, Jaws and the non directors cut of Close Encounters. One has to wonder how arguably the greatest actor of our time got roped into this affair with a ninny of a director? Perhaps he lost a drinking game bet?

And saving the worst for last…

ARGO: Unfortunately, Argo won. But, I guess it makes sense in that it’s rather emblematic of our time that a hack director (leader) with no concept of direction, no concept of how to write, no mis-en-scene to speak of and no art direction, though actors… yes actors… acting their roles for this sugar coated, diabetic inducing coma of a Lifetime “TV” movie. Undeniably the worst “Film of the Year” pick since Ordinary People beat out Raging Bull & Tess for the top spot. As German Film director Werner Herzog once said, “The world is starving for images and without them we will die. 2013 marks the year that Art has officially been relegated to tweetsville…

]]>
By: zzpat http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1057 Sun, 23 Jun 2013 21:12:46 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1057 IMO, Lincoln was the best movie by far. Better acting, better everything. Three hours seemed like a few minutes.

Argo was watchable but nothing great. Not even close.

Zero Dark Thirty was a joke. There isn’t a single scene from that movie that I remember. Hell, I remember the very first scene in Lincoln.

Ben Affleck is very new so maybe that’s why his movie won. It was not the best movie in any sense. We expect greatness from Spielberg and we get it, but where’s the discussion of impeachable offenses. He lied to congress and if he were alive today, he’d have kicked out of office. Obama haters look for the smallest wrong to attack him but using their standard, none of our greats would have been great.

If you haven’t seen Lincoln, it’s a movie you will never forget. I still think I can smell the cigar smoke in some of those scenes. The other two are forgettable but watchable.

]]>
By: SanPa http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-1024 Wed, 12 Jun 2013 12:27:09 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-1024 If fiction and propaganda are reflective of America, then Fox has been in the right business with their news source outlet.

]]>
By: euroyank http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/2013/01/11/the-oscars-reflections-of-america/#comment-892 Sun, 19 May 2013 11:48:40 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/nicholas-wapshott/?p=137#comment-892 Whether they are truly historical or not, I’d much prefer to hear about Lincoln that either of the secrets, they are American, that win thru violence and deception.

]]>