Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

Well, at least it’s wheelchair accessible…

March 22, 2007

Apparently just serving great food is no longer the preferred way to attract patrons to a restaurant, and don’t even think about presenting a tasteful, romantic decor. If you can’t bother making your place disgusting beyond belief, some other restaurateur will do it instead.

We’ve already seen our share of bizarre restaurant themes in this blog – toilets, Hitler, total darkness, animal heads – and now, welcome to death’s door.

Aurum, a controversial eatery in Singapore, features a morgue, surgical steel tables and gold wheelchairs, and the food is even stranger. Wee Sui Lee reports:

Oddly Enough Blogwheelchair3601.jpg

A dinning table is seen at the Aurum restaurant in Singapore, March 15, 2007. REUTERS/Tim Chong

Comments

The only thing that would make that restaraunt cooler is if the dishes and utensils were fake bones and body parts. You could serve soup in a severed head! Rock on!

Posted by K | Report as abusive
 

Amateurs. Try eating at Katz’s

 

So that’s where they send doctors who have lost their licenses.

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive
 

The blonde gets the Caesar Salad, the blue suit gets salmon almandine with blanched green salad, the sequined T-shirt gets a grapefruit half with cottage cheese and the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive
 

At least it gives people the chance to see what being in a wheelchair is like!

Luckily for them though, they can get up and walk afterwards.

 

“Let’s go out to eat tonight.”

“Ugh, I feel like death.”

“I know JUST the place”!

 

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