Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

“Nice biceps, hunk! Want some sex?”

July 10, 2007

Readers, who do you think get more sex?  Chiseled, muscular guys, or wimps? Go ahead, take your time and think about it carefully. Wow, you got it right on the first guess?  Me, too. 

Researchers at UCLA actually did a study on this, and came to the mind-boggling conclusion that women are “predisposed to prefer muscularity in men. I hope they didn’t spend more than $10 on the study, because that would have bought them a seat at Oceans Thirteen and answered all their questions.

But what I found most fascinating is that a noticeable number of stories about the study used the same phrase, which probably means it was in the press release. They referred to the muscular men’s “less-chiseled peers,” which has to be the euphemism of the month. As a spokesman for LCPs, thank you, UCLA! Here’s the story:

More Oddly Enough Blog

muscles3001.jpg
Roman Sebrle of the Czech Republic flexes his muscles for photographers after wining the decathlon at the European athletics championships in Gothenburg (Goteborg) August 11, 2006.      REUTERS/Phil Noble

Comments

Really? I hadn’t noticed.

 

I, personally, prefer non-muscular men. To me it’s simply annoying to try to hug someone that feels like they’re made out of concrete. I like them a little squishy so that they snuggle better.

Posted by K | Report as abusive
 

If you think this is insightful, how about stats canada reporting that blue collar workers are more likely to be injured at work than white collar workers?

Posted by Larry Dubb | Report as abusive
 

Me too, K. Muscles are nice to look at, but not to snuggle up with. Maybe the study wasn’t clear on that.

 

Muscles all the way! Give me any of the guys on maleperfection.net and I’m a happy lady! Kisses!

Posted by Bren | Report as abusive
 

Um, that’s okay, you can take a little time to think about it if you’re not sure…

Posted by Robert Basler | Report as abusive
 

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