Bogong with the wind…

October 10, 2007

It’s an ill wind that doesn’t fill somebody’s skillet, or however that saying goes. Strong winds in Australia are blowing migrating Bogong moths off-course and into Sydney, and residents are responding by, uh, eating them.

One chef cooks the moths, which are high in fat, in butter. A scientist says to limit your intake, because they contain poisonous pesticides. Whoa! It so happens I’m on a diet right now that calls for fatty foods, chock full of poison and cooked in butter!

The scientist says we should limit ourselves to 10 a day. I don’t think that will be any problem at all. Our Reuters Life! story, and Helen Long’s video report:

More Oddly Enough Blog

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Australian bogong moths rest on a piece of material in Sydney in a file photo. A Sydney chef is turning the insects invading the city and annoying its residents into a culinary ingredient. REUTERS/Will Burgess

8 comments

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High in fat means high in flavor. Cooked in butter means the lobster of the Insect world!

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive

In light of the earlier comment, do they turn red when cooked?

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive

Any chance the same wind will blow Jennifer Conelly far, far off course?

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive

Big deal. They taste just like chicken.

Dear Mr. Abell,
In the sense of evolution, I believe the moth appeared sooner. Thus, the chicken tastes like the moth.

Of course, who knows what a dinosaur-age moth would taste like? Did the moth develop the generic fleshy flavor before or after the chicken (rabbit, dove, snake, etc.)? And if no human was around to taste and record, what does it matter?

Sorry, Mr. Abell. Seems like I’m full of crap once again.

Your self-chastized blogging buddy,
Shawn

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive

How does one de-vein a moth?

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive

Unless they dress out at about a half-ounce apiece, I can’t see the point.

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive

You catch the moths of your choice. You stun. You skin. We cook what’s left. All to save you money.

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive