Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

“It’s a hook! It’s a rook!”

November 5, 2007

chess-2-140.jpgSome readers will think I’m making this up. There was just a championship competition in chess boxing, a sport with alternating rounds of boxing, chess, boxing, chess, like that.  See, I warned you.

I know what you’re thinking: chess players are smart, and boxers, um, aren’t. So  where do they get players? A good question. And how do they move those little-bitty pieces with boxing gloves? How can you say “check-mate” with those  teeth-guards?

And perhaps the best question of all, why didn’t they truly merge these two games? Give each boxer a 25-pound pawn made out of iron, and let them pound the poop out of each other until one of them can’t get up. Now, there’s a sport! A chess boxing slideshow

chess-360.jpg
Germany’s Frank Stoldt (R) and David Depto from the U.S. compete in chess boxing light heavyweight world championship fight in Berlin November 3, 2007.  REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

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Comments

We don’t think you are making this stuff up, but most days we just wish you were.

 

Coming up, the third event in our triathlon: Muffins!

 

What’s next, golf boxing?

Posted by Lady Weasel | Report as abusive
 

I’m just waiting for them to turn that Iron Chef competition into an actual fight to the death. First they cook, then they go at each other with meat cleavers. That would be cool!

Posted by K | Report as abusive
 

Talk about a Rocky horror.

Posted by Charlene | Report as abusive
 

Germany’s most smartest boxer?

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive
 

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