Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

With trends like these, who needs enemas?

January 31, 2008

You know how 10-year-old boys have competitions to see who can come up with the grossest thing? Well, watch and learn, kids.

It turns out people visiting a health resort got kind of a rude shock when a nurse giving them enemas failed to use water. Instead, she used hydrogen peroxide. Well, yes, the stuff you can bleach your hair with. Seventeen of them had to be treated in a hospital after the mix-up, according to our story.

I am not going to say anything else about this; you can just use your imagination for the rest. Or better still, ask a 10-year-old.

spa-hands-300.jpgNo, no, this is just healing oil, and this is a 2007 file photo of somebody at a petroleum spa in Azerbaijan. REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Comments

All I can say is that I almost puked when I saw that picture. I know it’s not what it looks like…but really…I almost puked.

Posted by K | Report as abusive
 

She’s obviously been reading Wikipedia recently.

And could you have found a less, or perhaps more, appropriate photo to go with this?

Posted by Charlene | Report as abusive
 

Is it time to choose champagne’s new nickname to replace ‘bubbly?’

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive
 

That’s it. I have never voluntarily gotten an enema and now, I never, ever will.

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive
 

Dear Basler,

Hydrogen peroxide enemas are mild. Now polonium farting, this is where the real action is at. I recommend you try it:

http://www.profscrub.com/2006/11/poloniu m-my-arse.html

Your radioactive farting Professor,
Prof Scrub
http://www.profscrub.com

 

Good thing they didnt forget to pay their hydrogen peroxide bill.

 

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