Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

Do you have the May issue of Nose-Picker?

April 24, 2008

valentino-200.jpgFrom Moscow, news that some billionaire is starting a magazine named Snob. I’m serious.

This is a turning point in publishing. If he can market directly to our worst character flaws, watch out! We’ll see slick, glossy magazines like Big Jerky Butthead, and Wanton Hussy.  Subscribe to Town Drunk, and get a year of Stupid Blabbermouth, free!

“Honey, has my April issue of Eternally Damned Adulterer arrived yet?”

“No dear, but your new copy of Slack-Jawed Yokel is on the coffee table.”

More stuff from Oddly Enough

Italian fashion designer Valentino at the Cannes Film Festival in 2007 photo.  REUTERS/Yves Herman

Comments

I’m launching a magazine called “Snub.” Our business model is to reject subscribers after a trial period with a letter that says, “Perhaps you should try Good Housekeeping instead.”

 

It just goes to show, just because you have money doesn’t automatically mean you have ‘decorum’ or maturity. It is a ‘verrry attrrrative’ pose for him. Even if I was a billionaire I don’t think I would the have money or want to pay for such a thing anyway.

Posted by Conscientious Observer | Report as abusive
 

Poor Mikhail Prokhorov; he got it exactly wrong, at least in English. The word “snob” was coined by Thackeray to describe crass, arrogant, pushy nouveaux riches who tried to insert themselves into society by throwing money around. The term was first used* in the book Vanity Fair, and may have been derived from the name of the Osborne family in that novel via anagram.

I suppose this means the magazine is accurately named.

*The word “snob” also meant “shoemaker” in Scots slang, but that word is likely not related to Thackeray’s coining.

Posted by Charlene | Report as abusive
 

I’ll keep it right next to Couch Potato Weekl… er… TV Guide.

Posted by Shawn Hendricks | Report as abusive
 

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