Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

This wine was made yesterday!

September 5, 2008

Blog Guy, I know you keep up with new technology.  I read that now they can determine the age of a wine by analyzing X-rays emitted when the bottles are placed under ion beams produced by a particle accelerator. 

Yes. Or, another way would be to just look at the label. After all, home particle accelerators take up valuable room where you could have another plasma TV.

wine-age-label-200.jpg

But I think the idea is this method shows if somebody has switched the wine in the bottle. 

Ah! I have often feared my corner wine shop is taking old 2005 Pinot Noir bottles and filling them with 2006 wine to get an extra $2.95 a whack.

Well, they could also be filling empty bottles of really costly wines with antifreeze, and the X-rays would reveal that.

You’re right! Because otherwise, I’d probably just keep drinking the antifreeze, thinking it was a 1787 Chateau Lafite. Darn you, corner wine shop! Sweetie, fire up the George Foreman particle accelerator!

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Herve Guegan, of the Nuclear Research Centre of Bordeaux, France, runs a test on a 1944 vintage bottle of Medoc wine on September 4, 2008. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau

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Comments

If only they were as concerned about personal hygiene as they are about the age of wine…

 

Of course, that one gulp of antifreeze means you won’t be alive to take a second…

Posted by Charlene | Report as abusive
 

Maybe they’ll be able to do the same with milk some time soon, too. I always like to know how long it’s been in the fridge for…

Posted by Melissa A. | Report as abusive
 

Who had the time and inclination to come up with this stupid test? Cancer, world hunger, peace on earth… so many better things to do. How about figuring out what happens to that other sock you can’t find after drying your clothes? ANYTHING but this stupidity.

Posted by DJBoca | Report as abusive
 

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