Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

I never noticed this mirror here before!

December 20, 2008

“Hey fella, anybody ever tell ya that you look a lot like me?

“Oh, of course they have! You’re one of those celebrity impersonators, aren’t you? You’re real good! I even have a shirt just like that one!

“In fact, Laura and me have a sofa like that, too! You really did your homework!

“Well, put ‘er there, pardner! Can we get a picture of me shakin’ hands with my lookalike?

“Whatsa matter, buddy? You don’t shake hands?”

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President George W. Bush jokingly shakes hands with himself at the unveiling of his portrait at the National Portrait Gallery  in Washington, December 19, 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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Comments

In other news…President Bush was injured in a case of mistaken identity today, when he poked a realistic painting of himself in the eye and was promptly tackled by Secret Service agents.

When asked about the incident, the Secret Service spokesman replied “My bad. It was just so realistic.”

Posted by K | Report as abusive
 

Sadly the painting was torn shortly after this photo was taken. As a pair of shoes came hurling through the air and ripping through the canvas.

Posted by Brian | Report as abusive
 

Good stuff, both of you…

Posted by Robert Basler | Report as abusive
 

After careful thought the president turned down that offer to give the commencement address at Clown U. Instead he’d send them this painting for target practice.

Posted by Brian | Report as abusive
 

Hahaha, good one!

Posted by Stevo | Report as abusive
 

Why doesn’t the picture have any shoes on? I think censorship in the US is going a bit overboard, really!

Posted by M | Report as abusive
 

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