Oddly Enough Blog

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Just which species made these feces?

December 23, 2008

If you’re like me, nothing makes you think of the Holy Land like donkey poop.

I mean, the donkeys are right there in the Nativity story, and where there are donkeys, there is, you know, leftover evidence of donkeys.

So, for a special souvenir of a visit to this special place, why not buy Holy Land donkey dung sealed in plastic, as seen in these actual photos taken near Nazareth?

Of course, being a skeptic by profession, I have to wonder what sort of regulatory system applies to the region’s tourism business.

* Is this all GENUINE Holy Land donkey poop?

* Could some of it be imported from Chinese donkeys?

* Could this just be worthless imitation donkey poop?

* Could it be from other beasts or…well, don’t go there.

Anyway, I’ll probably order some for gifts, but I’m going to want to see some kind of government certification.

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Donkey dung sealed in plastic is displayed in Kfar Kedem in the Israeli village of Hoshaya, near the northern town of Nazareth December 22, 2008. The donkey dung is sold as a souvenir from the Holy Land. REUTERS/Baz Ratner

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Comments

Hi, I’m linking your blog into my blog roll. Would appreciate it if you did the same with mine. http://blogs.app.com/saywhat/

Too funny, Great job!

 

It’s the new Donkey Poo in a Prism. Spread the sunshine and smell the . . . flowers???

Posted by JL | Report as abusive
 

Holy Crap! No, Really! Holy Crap! It’s Holy Crap! Holy Crap!

 

holy crap! hahaha :)

 

No, not Holy Crap. Possibly, Holy Land Crap. While the existence of mummified Holy Crap remains a possibility, the identification of same would be impossible in the absence of reference DNA. Of course, any of this would rate priceless relic status and would not be available to the public, encased in resin.

These scyballous little turds could easily be of donkey origin as their GI tracts are much more efficient than other Equus species. And, they probably are of genuine Holy Land origin. Over 25 percent of all donkeys reside in the People’s Republic; but, export of the People’s fertilizer, over the screaming protests of the feudal masses would be unlikely.

Posted by gwmc | Report as abusive
 

That’s interesting… Kind of gives me ideas as to what souvenirs could also be sold from Switzerland… Ah! I can just see the face on people coming into an office and seeing an immortalized cow dung on top of a fancy desk in Wall Street, probably a lawyer or an investment banker… Or maybe even on top of a Detroit car executive’s desk!!!

Posted by M | Report as abusive
 

Sounds like a lot of bullshit to me

Posted by fred briggs | Report as abusive
 

I also had my thoughts about dung for Christmas presents then remembered George Bush had already beaten me to it spreading enough sh– around the word for everybody.

Posted by Alan Wharton | Report as abusive
 

Holy Crap Quandry: God is omnipotent, so can he create a food even He cannot fully digest?

Posted by Kevin | Report as abusive
 

Whoever would buy a donkey donut must have a souvenir for brains. One has to spend one’s money wisely. For example, while I was on the way to the jewelry store to buy my wife her Christmas present, I met this guy on a street corner, see, and he had some magic beans….

Posted by Dr. Doll | Report as abusive
 

Thats what I call OUTSOURCING!
hahaha

Posted by sally | Report as abusive
 

Besides the disappointment of not getting to say “Holy Crap” first, I kinda want to know how much one has to pay for these things if you got that feeling you just had to have one.

 

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