Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

Coo? No, I said COOL! Cool!

February 3, 2009

Do you ever wonder who’s at the very, very bottom of the human dignity chain?

Well, it turns out he was picked up at an airport with two live pigeons stuffed in his tights. I mean, the tights ALONE are embarrassing enough.

But that’s not all. Mr. Dimwit was also hiding bird eggs, and samples of EGGPLANT.

To recap this story: man, pigeons, tights, eggplant.

And finally, readers please note the caption warning against using this photo for ad campaigns. I am not making this up.

So, you folks looking for illustrations to advertise leg hair remover or poultry sleeping bags, you’re out of luck.

And Adidas, even though they appear to be your tights, you just FORGET about a product placement deal!

Enjoy doughnuts more! Join the Oddly Enough blog network!

Live pigeons, stuffed into the tights of a man, at Melbourne International Airport in a February 1 2009 picture released by Australian Customs. REUTERS/Australian Customs/Handout. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.

More stuff from Oddly Enough

Comments

Pigeons on the ankles… Hmmm… Is this like a degenerative result of being pigeon-toed?

Well, maybe it’s just that his fly is down…

 

I think the bigger story here is that we have finally located Bigfoot.

Posted by S | Report as abusive
 

Did he really expect to sneak through customs with his tights around his ankles and two birds peeking out? He wouldn’t even be able to walk straight, and if Melbourne Airport is still anything like I remember it those crocs and emus sure get in your way while you drag your two-piece luggage set across the dusty concourse with one hand and simultaneously struggle to hold on to your Explorer Series ™ khaki safari hat which is being blown away by the twin-prop with the other.

Well, seeing as he is called Mr. Dimwit, I guess we shouldn’t be surprised. I mean, what are the odds?

 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/