Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

Apart from that, Mrs. Lincoln…

February 12, 2009

Please help me think this through, because I could be all wrong. Last night, there was a grand and glittering celebration of the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth, which is today.

President Barack Obama was there along with other big names, as befits a guy who is on our money even though folks don’t have much of it these days.

My problem is, guess where they held it? Ford’s Theater. Yes, the very place where Lincoln didn’t get to finish the play the last time he was there.

Is that poor taste, or what? Will we be celebrating John Kennedy’s birthday on that street in Dallas?

It gets stranger. They played a violin that was used at Ford’s Theater the night Lincoln was killed, and they had an actor dressed as Lincoln, which has got to be one creepy gig for that guy.

But what REALLY bothers me is that if we’ve reached a point where Blog Guy is the one pointing out other people’s bad taste, that’s a sure sign the Apocalypse is hurtling toward us at warp speed. Run for your lives.

Peace and love! Join the Oddly Enough blog network!

Above: President Barack Obama greets an actor portraying Abraham Lincoln, February 11, 2009.

Below: Television news anchor Katie Couric reacts after Obama kissed her.

REUTERS photos by Jason Reed

More stuff from Oddly Enough

Comments

The celebration at Fords theater was not to celebrate Lincolns birthday per se. That theater has been turned into a museum for Lincoln, a museum to not only honor Lincoln, but also Lincoln’s interest in the arts. There was recently a major renovation at the theater. This event that Barack went to was to celebrate that re-opening after the renovation and it was scheduled on his birthday probably just to partake of the interest engendered by this being his 200th BD.

There were other celebrations yesterday that were more directly attuned to Lincon’s BD, this one was not.

Posted by mark | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/