Oddly Enough Blog

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March 26, 2009

Blog Guy, you did a thing on Treasury Secretary Smiley Geithner recently that I felt didn’t give him enough credit.

“Give credit” is an unfortunate phrase to use these days.

You know what I mean. I’ve heard he is a great speaker who really brings the financial crisis to life for audiences young and old.

That’s absolutely true. He puts on a spectacular show, using talking hands to explain the crisis.

As you can see here, he lowers his head, then raises it and uses ventriloquism to voice characters like “Mortgage Mort,” “Hedge Fund Hedgehog,” “Slimey Subprimey,” “Dummy the Hard-Working Sucker Taxpayer,” etc. He’s a show-stopper.

Wow, I have to catch that act! Do you know who he was addressing in these photos?

Sorry, no idea.

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U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, March 25, 2009. REUTERS/ Shannon Stapleton

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Comments

Not to be putting words in Mr Bobs mouth, but…

Ever read the book by Ernie Hemingway? ‘For whom the bells tolls’

The bell tolls for you!

Posted by tim | Report as abusive
 

“Redrum, Redrum”.

Posted by Bill | Report as abusive
 

Bottom photo 1 caption:
“And so, like, then this guy–we’ll call him Aigey–comes along, right? And he sees your money and he’s all like CHOMP CHOMP CHOMP CHOMP”

Bottom photo 2 caption:
“And then after, this is like, how much of your money you have left.”

Posted by Mel | Report as abusive
 

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