Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

Skinny Minnie and the pageant?

April 23, 2009

Let’s face it, the human skeleton is a sexy thing. You take a bunch of bare bones, add a bikini, and you’ve got the makings of a beauty queen, right?

No, I don’t think so either, I just wanted to prepare readers for a controversy in Australia, where a contestant in the Miss Universe Australia pageant was 5’11″ tall but weighed only 108 pounds.

You can see Stephanie Naumoska on the left, compared with a human skull, believed to be the look she was going for.

Stephanie didn’t win the title – that went to a woman with actual flesh – but she got close enough to ignite a scandal. Our story mentions the “glittering” finals of the event, although in fairness Stephanie collapsed when a piece of the glitter actually landed on her, and couldn’t get up until it was lifted off.

The pageant director says Stephanie is of Macedonian heritage, thus accounting for her extreme thinness, but a nutritionist told an Australian newspaper there’s no such thing as a fricking Macedonian body type, and so the controversy continues.

Our handout from the pageant warns that Stephanie’s photo can’t be used for advertising. Call me crazy, but I don’t think they’re going to have a problem with that.

Waste your mind. Join the Oddly Enough blog network

Sydney model Stephanie Naumoska poses in a bikini in Sydney, April 21, 2009. REUTERS/ Miss Universe Australia/Handout FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS

More stuff from Oddly Enough

Comments

Again, you find a way to get to the bare bones of a matter … getting us the real skinny on a situation … fleshing out a story …

Darn, I can’t think of any Macedonian puns …

Posted by Beth | Report as abusive
 

This because gay men judge these competitions. They don’t care whether a woman is sexy. If straight men judged these competitions, the winners would always have curves and large boobs.

Posted by Aaron | Report as abusive
 

I have a 2 X 4 that I nailed…oh never mind.

Posted by Bill | Report as abusive
 

that woman looks nasty and boney – i like my thick woman! big booty’s – hear that lady’s!

Posted by gary p | Report as abusive
 

I dont know. She could actually be telling the truth. Im 511 as well. I barely can make th 130 mark. I work out and eat well. Ive BEEN 100 punds before too. I was not eating and living a very VERY stressed out life. Plus I was drinking. I want to believe her but at the same time she says shes eating 6 meals a day….

Posted by Shree | Report as abusive
 

I thought this article complements rather well the one posted a a day before on bras and their filling… or lack thereof, really, in this case…

Posted by M | Report as abusive
 

She looks like a potato-sack full of deer-antlers….or #5 Newhouse bear-traps. No doubt it would be somewhat painful sharing a sleeping-bag with THAT young lady…ouch…but somebody must have seen potential somewhere along the line. Maybe she can cook or do beadwork. Maybe she can make a fast bannock or boil a quick can of tea. But I doubt she could keep anyone warm when it gets down to -45c. Just a thought.

Posted by Olaf | Report as abusive
 

THIS IS THE MOST DISGUSTING THING I’VE HAVE EVER SEEN AND WOULD NEVER ALLOW TO COMPETE IN ANY COMPETITION. I’VE SEEN BETTER BODIES ON COCKERSPANIELS.

Posted by DAVID | Report as abusive
 

In one of the press photos I saw she looked just like a character from Reign: The Conquereor – maybe that’s what they meant by “Macedonian.”

Posted by EEdwin | Report as abusive
 

Why the need to comment on whether or not her body is pretty, why is it that a woman is so harshly judged for being too skinny or too big. Obviously htis wpoman has a problem and is undernourished, stop making comments about how beautiful/ugly she is. that’s what the competition was for.

Posted by Kate | Report as abusive
 

kate your oblivious to the world. your telling me that if you were in charge of the competition, you would not feel bad about allowing malnutritioned competitors to competete when their lives are in danger. get your life together

Posted by DAVID | Report as abusive
 

Ive been skinny my whole life, have been constantly criticized for it and made fun of. Ive also been trying to gain wieght and its next to impossible for me. I understand what shes going through and believe her 100 percent why is it so hard for people to believe that skinny people may naturally be like that??? She is 5-11 its probubly 10 times more difficult for her to gain wieght. Everyone who is stick thin is not aneroxic…people need to get over it. As long as shes happy with what she looks like thats all that really matters

Posted by Dee | Report as abusive
 

for one thing Deeeeeee. its not aneroxic its anorexic. wow i guess skinny cant spell either. regardless if she’s a natural twig, she should not be allowed to compete in a competition where younger girls look up to them. they are portrayed as beautiful women, which send a message to younger girlsa that thats what their supposed to look like. from a real man’s veiw, yeah being skinny is okay but not in a place where younger girls and women are gonna look up to you and have unrealistic expectations of other bodies. and thats that you pre-madonna.

Posted by david | Report as abusive
 

Six meals a day? More like six raisins a day? Obviously being that skinny, the brain doesn’t have any nourishment.

The things we women do put vanity over our health is insanity. Not only that, what we promote our unhealthy life-style to others, especially children, encouraging them to do the same. This goes for men and women. It’s a deadly cycle and I hope one day, those gay fashion men will see that clothes aren’t meant for skeletons to flaunt. Personality is something that will always stay the same, not the body.

Posted by -recovering anorexic | Report as abusive
 

I’d rather be bit thin like her than too fat, with a diagnosis of pre-diabetes, like me.
Besides, who can tell if she is attractive or not without talking to her first?

Posted by Justinfromwork | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/