Oddly Enough Blog

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Advice on juggling careers?

June 25, 2009

Blog Guy, I recently graduated from college with a major in creative writing and a minor in film studies. What sort of job should I be looking for?

Can you juggle?

What? You mean like tennis balls?

No, more like chainsaws. Ones that are actually running. If you check out the photo below, I think there may be an opening when Stumpy here “retires.”

We already know that his assistant, Lefty, isn’t going to move up in the organization.

Maybe you didn’t understand me. I said creative writing and film studies. Shouldn’t I command something better than chainsaw-juggling?

Of course, my mistake. Do you think you could bend a horseshoe with your teeth?

Yes, thanks! That’s more like it!

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Above: Rainer Schroeder, 48, from Germany, bends a horseshoe with his teeth to set a new World Record during the Impossibility Challenger in Dachau, north of Munich June 21, 2009.

Left: Milan Roskopf, of Slovakia, juggles three motor saws during the Impossibility Challenger.

REUTERS photos by Michaela Rehle

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Comments

The amazing thing to me is that he’s NOT actually stumpy! Can I assume he’s the best chainsaw juggler in the world? The competition must be thin on this one. Then again, a competition would give new meaning to the term ‘claiming a handicap’…

 

I don’t know what all the buzz is about. There are only 2 types of chainsaw jugglers: Competent & Former

Thanks for sharing this little slice of life.

 

Can that chainsaw guy still count to ten on only two hands?

Posted by Craig | Report as abusive
 

I understand how someone gets to be a chainsaw juggler. Start with rubber balls, move through bowling pins, and so on to running chainsaws.

But how does one discover that he’s able to bend iron with his teeth?

 

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