Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

How the masses found Manassas…

July 25, 2011

Blog Guy, I am really pumped about the Civil War 150th anniversary stuff coming up. Aren’t you?

You bet. I went to the Manassas reenactment over the weekend, and loved it! What I saw was First Manassas, as opposed to Second Manassas, which happened a year later.

Ah, so they number Civil War battles?

Yep, just like Rocky movies. I already have my tickets for Gettysburg III.

Anyway, it was very hot, and the troops were drinking from these round canteens. Where do you suppose the soldiers bought those?

From the general store or snack shop on their base?

Yes, they got their canteens from the Canteen.

I don’t like where this is going, Blog Guy.

Did you know the Confederates had spies and accomplices working for them in the North?

Yes, I did know that the Confederates had some, um,  confederates. Curse you, Blog Guy!

Do you think the Confederates’ confederates drank from Canteen canteens?

Stop that!

It turns out, the whole Manassas battle pivoted on the Rebels getting their broken bayonets back from the repair shop in time.

How do you know that?

Our guide said they attacked with “fixed bayonets.”

That’s enough! Hey, Blog Guy, wasn’t Manassas also called Bull Run?

No, you’re thinking of Pamplona.

Manassas reenactment photo slideshow

Join the Oddly Enough blog network

Follow this blog on Twitter at rbasler

Top: Union forces fire on Confederate lines during the reenactment of the Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run in Manassas, Virginia July 23, 2011. The event commemorates the 150th anniversary of the first major conflict of the Civil War.

Right: Young Civil War reenactor takes a swig from his canteen in the Confederate Army camp on a blistering hot day in Manassas, Virginia July 21, 2011.

Left: A Confederate soldier prepares for battle during the reenactment,  July 23, 2011.

Bottom left: A Confederate commander shouts an order to his men during the reenactment, July 23, 2011.

REUTERS photos by Kevin Lamarque

More stuff from Oddly Enough

Comments

Being from the north, the heat was more oppressive than the troops. Good thing I had my yankee hanky to dab my damp face.

Posted by Onedoor | Report as abusive
 

On Sunday, many of the folks attended services in the area. Yes, some of the masses went to the masses…

Posted by Onedoor | Report as abusive
 

With all the folks looking to decorate their homes for the event, do you suppose they went bunting hunting?

Posted by Onedoor | Report as abusive
 

There were white gloves and ball gowns
as the Blue and Grey danced.
Smiling with one another.
Give peace a chance.

Posted by Onedoor | Report as abusive
 

I think I know what the comments are gonna be like…
Think I should be bench warming, its been a-while..

Get sassy with the puns, join the OE blog network!

Posted by Shra | Report as abusive
 

I heard there was a shortage of availables horses. Yep, the masses sometimes had to use asses to get to Manassas.

Blue or Grey, today’s the day…join the OE Blog Network!

Posted by GeorgiaPeach | Report as abusive
 

That’s true, Georgia, and women weren’t allowed there at all without written permission. The lasses used passes to get to Manassas…

Posted by rcbasler | Report as abusive
 

What’s for breakfast, Private Lamar? Oh, I love pancakes. What…no maple syrup? Well, I understand you can make something pretty decent from some of those grasses over there. Haven’t you heard of sorghum molasses?

Posted by GeorgiaPeach | Report as abusive
 

I’m looking at Pic #2 of the “soldier” taking a drink and was wondering if it is a Canton Canteen…and if they even had those during the civil war.

Posted by Moonshine | Report as abusive
 

And of course Lonnie, Lamar, and Eugene “Grass Stain” Johnson find time for a quick nap.

Posted by iflydaplanes | Report as abusive
 

I hear the food was bad if you weren’t used to it. When the lasses with the passes came on asses to Manassas, the molasses from the grasses gave them gasses.

Posted by ladylala | Report as abusive
 

“Toilet Head Johnson, Salami Johnson, Grass Stain Johnson”–what an illustrious family. There must be more.

Posted by ladylala | Report as abusive
 

Nothing in the Civil War ever surpasses the Manassas brasses who led the troops into morasses. That what kids today learn in classes.

Posted by slick9 | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/