Oddly Enough Blog

News, but not the serious kind

Can YOU pass the Budapest Test?

August 25, 2011

Blog Guy, I know you have a background in education. What is the most widely accepted test to identify people with extremely low IQs?

The standard practice is just to look for people who wear baseball caps backwards. It’s foolproof, so to speak.

Yes, but I understand that method is most accurate on teenage boys. Is there a test that can be applied to a broader spectrum?

There is the so-called Budapest Test, but it’s relatively new.

Tell me about it.

They gave cardboard boxes containing swimwear to 10,000 people and one orangutan, when it was 100 degrees outside under the relentless August sun.

Very interesting. Then what happened?

The 10,000 people opened the boxes, put on the swimsuits and squeezed themselves into a swimming pool, where all they could do was stand and sweat in a tepid mix of water and who knows what else. It was miserable.

And the orangutan?

He flattened the box to provide some nice shade, traded the swimsuit for an icy cold lemonade, and just sat in the grass. He had a grand old time.

So when will they know the results of the test?

Seriously? I’m sorry, I have some very bad news for you.

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Top: An orangutan uses a cardboard box as a makeshift sun shelter in Budapest’s Zoo August 24, 2011. Temperatures reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit in Hungary.

Right: People are seen in a pool at the Palatinus outdoor spa in Budapest, August 24, 2011.

REUTERS photos by Bernadett Szabo

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Comments

That’s one smart orangutan!

“Don’t monkey around, join the OE Blog Network.”

Posted by Dave_not_dave | Report as abusive
 

Oh, dont remind me of the spas… ofcourse they were indoor, heated pools when the temperature outside was, well, a LOT cooler than 100F…

Oh, what a spa…

Posted by Shra | Report as abusive
 

Surely, you jest. At whose behest do these folks take the Budapest Test? You can be my guest to take this test let you think I disagree that it’s the best. If one wears a life vest in Budapest, does s/he get a different score on the Budapest test? I don’t want to be a pest, but I can hardly rest until I know more about this test.

Posted by 69Spinster | Report as abusive
 

Doughnuts. That’s my answer. (I’m not a good test taker)

How’d I do? :-)

Posted by justCAM | Report as abusive
 

Hey!!! Wait a minute! I see my sister! She’s the one on the left with sunglasses on! Kewl.

Posted by justCAM | Report as abusive
 

Well Cam, as long as she’s not the one under the cardboard box…

Posted by Dave_not_dave | Report as abusive
 

@Dave … nope, no sunglasses. ;-)

Posted by justCAM | Report as abusive
 

Jeez, stop insultin’ ma sister, she doan ned no effing sunglasses, she got da box.

Posted by ming45 | Report as abusive
 

Budapest Test participants in the gene pool…

Posted by Onedoor | Report as abusive
 

@justCAM, your sister has a nice smile. Can I take her out for doughnuts sometime?

Ok show of hands, how many people just wanna high five that orangutan? I totally do. That’s one chill primate.

Posted by iflydaplanes | Report as abusive
 

Hmm, another version of where’s Waldo? (the one in the red-striped Speedo?)…Come to think of it, where’s Moammar?

Posted by FriscoJohn | Report as abusive
 

The Blog is eerily similar to my life at work this week.
The pieces of my projects look like the haphazard mess of people in the pool, and I just want to hide under a cardboard box. I might or might not look like an orangutan.

Posted by 69Spinster | Report as abusive
 

I humbly offer two unrelated haiku:

It’s a zoo out there
In pools and under cardboard
Must be Budapest

Buddha is no pest!
How dare you say that he is!
…Oh? Sorry. My bad.

Posted by 69Spinster | Report as abusive
 

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