Comments on: The moving story of Afghanistan, Pakistan and the CIA http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2008/03/10/the-moving-story-of-afghanistan-pakistan-and-the-cia/ Perspectives on Pakistan Thu, 01 Oct 2015 19:31:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: khaqan http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2008/03/10/the-moving-story-of-afghanistan-pakistan-and-the-cia/comment-page-1/#comment-81 Wed, 12 Mar 2008 11:25:04 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2008/03/10/the-moving-story-of-afghanistan-pakistan-and-the-cia/#comment-81 To me America is passing through a very critical phase of its History….It is the worst leadership they are having now…The end result is no secret…. American has given up their support and love for democracy and humanity. I am afraid history will remember Bush Administration only as an initiating agent of down fall for American civilization. The Afghan and Pakistan Policy is an absolute failure for Americans. America can fight and destroy its opponents because it has a huge military and financial power but it can’t win the war because America lacks the moral powers. It is the lesson of History that no war can be won without solid moral grounds. I am afraid Americans are missing this ground and it is a misfortune not only for America but for whole of the world.

Being an ordinary Pakistani it is painful for me that America is responsible for dictatorial role in my country. People of my country also need justice and freedom of expression and they dislike the American support for autocratic role of governance. The double standards of American policy makers has made the country an icon of cruelty and hatred among ordinary masses of Pakistan.

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By: J. S. Oppenheim http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2008/03/10/the-moving-story-of-afghanistan-pakistan-and-the-cia/comment-page-1/#comment-79 Tue, 11 Mar 2008 15:16:22 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2008/03/10/the-moving-story-of-afghanistan-pakistan-and-the-cia/#comment-79 The election of the development-oriented Awami National Party in Pakistan’s Northwest Frontier Province followed within days by the targeting and roadside bombing of a bride and her wedding party tell the Pakistani story in microcosm.

Writers may be making too much of Pakistan’s seemingly convoluted internal politics and macropolitical relationships in determining cause or motive for terrorism. From the brief insurrection at Lal Masjid to the latest bombing in Lahore, there’s a romantic irrelevance to guerrilla violence that Pakistanis, the most direct of its victims, survivors, and witnesses, cannot overlook. Empowered by having damaged Musharraf’s position through electoral process, the same representative voters should find it that much more difficult to blame the President and Administration (or America or others) for what they’re encountering in late-breaking militant acts.

Moreover, although the importance of President Musharraf’s political survival has been far reduced by the general election, the transfer of responsibility to other elected representatives has not changed the issues, terrorism counting as but one among many, facing the political body in its totality.

As regards terrorism, the coalition government may find its homegrown own and not a few imported Kalashnikov stars closer in behavior than they may wish to western eco-pranksters, rock bands, and such as “Unibomber” Ted Kaczynski or Murrah Federal Building bombers Terry Nichols and Timothy McVeigh (renegades, loners, moral entrepreneurs, etc.), and they’re going to have to deal with that social phenomenon in scores.

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