Times Square bombing; was the inspiration from the U.S. or Pakistan?

May 4, 2010

times squareThe failed car bomb attack on New York’s Times Square this weekend is almost certain to rekindle questions about a “jihadi highway” where citizens of western countries, often radicalised at home, seek either inspiration or training from one of many militant groups based in Pakistan.

According to a U.S. law enforcement source, Faisal Shahzad, the Pakistani-American arrested on suspicion of driving the car into Times Square this weekend, told authorities he was acting alone. But investigators are also looking into a recent trip he made to Pakistan to see if he had links to Islamist militants based there, which include al Qaeda, the Pakistani Taliban and a host of Punjab-based groups and splinter organisations, some originally linked to the fight against India in Kashmir.

In Pakistan, security sources said police had made some arrests, including of family members, in connection with the attack.  An intelligence official said Shahzad had received militant training in northwest Pakistan near the garrison town of Kohat. The area around Kohat is a stronghold of Tariq Afridi, the main Pakistani Taliban commander in the region.

Any training Shahzad did receive in Pakistan (and let’s remember that he has only been arrested so far rather than found guilty) was unlikely to have been particularly extensive given the rather amateurish nature of the car bomb he is accused of assembling.

“My first take is whoever did this didn’t have a whole lot of training, if any. And could have solely gone off manuals they’ve found on the net,” counter-terrorism expert Leah  Farrall wrote on her blog before some of the latest details were reported.  “There are ample training materials out there from all manner of terrorist groups and crazies. And plenty of things that outline how to build a device just like this.”

She adds that it is far more difficult for an untrained person to engineer a bomb explosion than most people think. ”This is why, for example, training for construction of explosives and explosives devices in terrorist training camps has historically taken up to two years,  as opposed to the usual basic training where people are trained how to ‘use’ explosives instead of how to build devices. It is an ongoing problem for militant groups. This is why some of them (and here I’m thinking AQ) often sent the detonator or a key part of it back with those it was deploying to carry out attacks. Especially for the more sophisticated attacks.  Or they gave intensive one on one or small group training.”

Alec Barker made a similar point in an article for Foreign Policy.

“This attempted attack reveals how easy it can be to deliver a car bomb — or at least a vehicle loaded with combustible materials — into the center of a bustling urban area,” he wrote.

“However, it also shows how difficult it can be to actually accomplish a full explosion. Producing a complete detonation has been the most important hurdle for a number of failed terrorist bombers, including Christmas Day bomber Omar Farouk Abdulmutallab, shoe bomber Richard Reid, the bombers of the June 30, 2007 Glasgow Airport attacks, and the bombers of the July 21, 2005 attacks against the London public transit system. While all of these attackers in some way initiated their bombs, none of them caused the explosions — or the accompanying devastation and loss of life — that they intended.”

Nor does Shahzad appear to have received the kind of motivational training that produces either the suicide bombers associated with al Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban, or the “fedayeen” attackers  – trained to fight to the death – often associated with Kashmir-centric groups. “The aspiration to martyrdom associated with al-Qaeda and similar movements does not appear to have motivated the bomber in this instance,” wrote Barker. 

So the question that is likely to come up – and if past experience is anything to go by it will be a subject of much soul-searching and angry debate - is this: To what extent was Shahzad an “amateur” who had been radicalised in the United States in a way that may have prompted him to seek training or contacts with Pakistan-based militant groups? Or alternatively to what extent should Pakistan-based militant groups be seen as “exporting” their jihadi ideology abroad?

It’s a question that has come up often in Britain given its large Pakistani diaspora. It has only emerged far more recently in the United States, particularly after last year’s arrest in Chicago of David Headley, who has pleaded guilty of working with the Lashkar-e-Taiba to plan the 2008 attack on Mumbai .

In a globalised and Internet-connected world, the answer is likely to be somewhere between the two – domestic radicalisation is made more dangerous by the presence of militant camps in Pakistan where would-be jihadis can seek inspiration and training.  But remembering that it is not black and white is important, particularly for those who want simple answers to the threat of terrorism.

And as a brief postscript, stand-by for some rehashes of that now very familiar question. Why are U.S.-led forces fighting in Afghanistan when the threat appears to be coming from militants in Pakistan? Or, for that matter, from those at home?

(Photo Times Square/Shannon Stapleton)

Comments

Myra,

I think you are way over analyzing this attempted terrorist attack.

The bottom line is that the Pakistani community abroad, need to look after their children and have a good close relation ship with them and Pakistan is somewhat insincere about its soil being used for terrorism.

Why are these kids going to somebody else for a sense of belonging and purpose? Why have they fallen prey to someone else’s way of thinking.. the answer is the parents did not do their job.

The parents are to blame for not paying enough attention and Pakistan is responsible for allowing its soil to continued to be used for activities, that will lead to killing of innocent people in other countries, including their own. They have to step up the effort, 100 fold to eradicate their soil of extremist training camps, no excuses.

Secondly and even more important, this attack underscores and speaks constant volumes of Pakistan’s commitment to root out terror completely.

Why are these training camps in Pakistan still allowed to operate? Why are these camps not being decapitated and flattened. These camps continue to be magnets to attract disenfranchised, alienated Pakistani diaspora youth, who have bad relationships, or at least no relationships to their family.

Thirdly, host nations like the U.S. or the U.K. need to rethink their policies and change the laws with respect to religious based terror groups or those of any kind.

Immediate deportation, revocation of citizenship status, jailing or charges of high treason against the state should be initiated of any religious clerics, preaching hate, supremacy against those of other religions or cultures. In the name of national security, these laws must be changed to uphold democracy and right of every individual to live securely and freely, as long as they do not hurt others.

It is time that nations stop being held hostage to their own liberalism and kind-hearted way of being. Their has to be a line drawn somewhere, the pandering must stop, otherwise the law-abiding, peaceful citizens are not being looked after.

Posted by G-W | Report as abusive
 

It is a big surprise that no one in Pakistan denied anything. Typically they deny first that the attacker is a Pakistani, then they deny that he ever came to Pakistan, then they deny saying that he ever came to Pakistan, then all access to the town where the evidence points are closed, then their media goes on a spin saying it is a RAW conspiracy or a Zionist conspiracy. They go on denying until someone slaps them on the cheek and shows them hard evidence. Then they reluctantly set up a case and start playing a delay drama asking for more evidence. Suddenly Rehman Malik has taken off offering full support and Pakistan has already arrested all the relatives of the culprit! Oh,I understand. The cozying up with the US will be hit very hard if more worms are released from the can.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Is anybody surprised that the attempted bomber is of Pakistani descent and from Peshawar?

That’s the funny anything about terrorist and terrorist groups. Once they start they can’t stop. It’s starts with hatred towards India. Then it becomes hatred towards Israel and the US. And eventually it becomes hatred towards anyone that isn’t Muslim or even Muslim enough for them.

And now it’s begun to impact Pakistan’s own security. There’s the obvious, of course; the bombings inside Pakistan. But now Pakistan’s “non-state actors” have begun to target Pakistan’s key allies.

Maybe Pakistanis will finally learn to stop look at terrorists as good (those who attack everybody else) and bad (those who attack us) and finally have the gumption to target terrorists across the board. If they don’t, the isolation of Pakistan and Pakistanis is pretty much assured.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

Myra,

While I appreciate you raising the question of where Mr. Shahzad was radicalized, I think it’s equally relevant to ask if such an attack was possible had he not had his (alleged) training in Pakistan.

While the attack may have seemed amateurish and the IED could have been constructed based on internet manuals, if what we know is true, the suspect himself has admitted to receiving training in Pakistan. So why discount the probability that he was taught his bomb-making skills in Pakistan or at the very minimum given sound instructions on how to find the relevant information on IED construction?

The depressing fact about this attack, is that the West is now seeing the beginnings of low-tech, high frequency terrorism. The kind Indians and Pakistanis have been seeing for months/years now. More frequent attacks are bound to keep Pakistan in the news. And there’s a real possibility that Pakistan could suffer serious strategic consequences as a result of this trend.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

More frequent attacks are bound to keep Pakistan in the news. And there’s a real possibility that Pakistan could suffer serious strategic consequences as a result of this trend.

Posted by kEiThZ
—-

hmm…and why is this bad?

Let us imagine a hypothetical situation. Let’s imagine pakistan army successfully wages terrorism on civilians only inside India, and there is no blow back effect, i.e no terrorism inside pakistan or inside its “allies”.

The “allies” will be smugly looking the other way, and supply enormous funds and gadgets to pakistan army/ISI….to continue its terrorism inside India.

As some one from India, who lived through pakistan sponsored terrorism, this is all good news. Finally the smug “allies”, the enablers and sustainers of pakistani terrorism are tasting terrorism medicine.

Actuallu the above is not a hypothetical situation, but a real situation faced by India until very recently.

Welcome news for India, that paksitani terrorism is an international problem and not just an indian problem.

Posted by Seekeroftruth | Report as abusive
 

And now we know he’s the son of a retired PAF Air Vice-Marshal. This just gets more and more interesting.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

Agree with Seekeroftruth..
This is indeed a welcome news for India as Pakistan sponsored terrorism is no longer problem of India alone.

Posted by Pravinraje | Report as abusive
 

The guy planted a bomb, whether it was nuclear, powerful, or useless is besides the point. Whether he was radicalised in the USA or Pakistan is besides the point. That he was till last year a Pakistani and that he did receive training in Pakistan is about par for the course. The bottom line is he is a terrorist. Luckily he was unsuccessful.

That Pakistanis and their friends are feeling defensive is also understandable.

Posted by DaraIndia | Report as abusive
 

Myra- Why are U.S.-led forces fighting in Afghanistan when the threat appears to be coming from militants in Pakistan? Or, for that matter, from those at home?

Just wait and watch..there is limits of patience..
Pakistan is going to be the new war base for USA. And there will be separate treatment for the citizens of Pakistan in USA.
Unless Pakistani establishment both civilian and army, gathers courage to fight all forms of terrorist the world view of the country is not going to change.

Posted by Pravinraje | Report as abusive
 

It is an important question that needs addressing; a number of religious institutions in US and UK are involved in preaching hatred among its followers. It is important for the authorities in US to check the activities of religious schools in their areas.

Posted by SZaman88 | Report as abusive
 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/may  /04/faisal-shahzad-alleged-times-square -bomber

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/con tent/article/2010/05/04/AR2010050405329_ 2.html?sid=ST2010050201717

Profile of Faisal Shahzad. The mere fact that he is the son of a retired PAF officer and hails from Peshawar, should have saved a lot of lives. Faisal Shahzad’s background will bring a lot of questions, being a son of PAF officer, a graduate of University of Bridgeport Connecticut with degrees in computer science and Business Administration, working in Wall Street as financial analyst, his house lost to mortgage lenders and he suffered from recession. He looks more like an American. I am sure his upbringing would have been under a very moderate and educated environment (One reason he failed to gain access to sophisticated terrorist training resulting in failed bomb attempt ultimately causing no loss to property and lives of others). But it really depends it looks though still his roots were a bit conservative.

His motives look personal, just like Mir Aimal Kasi who killed CIA employees in front of CIA heaquarters in Langely Virginia and later fled to Pakistan. Though Faisal’s background is different to that of Mir Aimal Kasi.

And it is ironic if he got affected due to situation in Pakistan. PAF is using F-16s and laser guided bombs against millitants in Western Pakistan. CIA has become a counter-terror air force with its drone strikes in the region. It must have affected him. His cell phone record shows he bought the SUV and later phoned the buyer to ask when was the last oil change done. Odd when considered the motive was to blow up the SUV he might possibly not have resorted to the act if someone would have intervened (close friend) who could read his intentions, change his mind.
My father served in PAF and I was born in Peshawar, I still have friends there. It is a tragic war in Afghansitan that has taken its toll in Pakistan’s western region.
This particular incident must not result in profiling of Pakistanis, rather the bigger question of WHY? should be addressed.

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

It is an important question that needs addressing; a number of religious institutions in US and UK are involved in preaching hatred among its followers. It is important for the authorities in US to check the activities of religious schools in their areas.

http://www.islamicnet.com

Posted by islamicnet | Report as abusive
 

We have a similar problem on a smaller scale in our own cities. We have gangs that live by their own set of rules. We have hate mongering among our own Christian religious organizations.

Allowing people into our society, who because of their religious beliefs already harbor a hatred for our western culture, only creates an even more volatile situation in the USA…and worse…us going into their countries to force them to adapt to our culture sets the stage for increased terrorism worldwide. They are going to fight it, just as we would fight their intrusion into our way of life.

If we can figure out how to solve our own cultural problems, then we could become an example for the world. They might WANT to be more like us instead of hating us.

Posted by TnMuse | Report as abusive
 

Pakistan has become a highly toxic & filthy cesspool which breeds radicalizm & terror. Hatred & vengeance has seeped into the Pakistani phsyche & is preached in Pakistani schools, mosques, madrasaas & living rooms. As a result, common Pakistanis have become bitter, belligerant & irrational. They hate anyone who does not agree with them or attempts to expose their bigotry & shamelessly flaunt their nukes . They are constantly instigated with theories on how muslims all over the world are being destroyed by the US, Isreal, India, west etc. The atmosphere in Pakistan has become so maliciously malevolent that it is also influencing Pakistanis living abroad.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

It’s not at all surprising that almost every terror attack anywhere in the world, successful or foiled, has some Pakistani connection or the other. It’s about time that the US & the west realize the danger which emanates from the terror haven called Pakistan & stop treating it with kid gloves. The Pakistanis should be given an ultimatum to clean up their mess or face dire consequences. At home, western & other civilized countries should not only monitor the Pakistanis entering their borders or living there but also ban travel to Pakistan untill it is cleaned up & anyone who goes there shouldn’t be allowed back in. The measure might be radical but it might be the only option to save innocent lives at home.

As to why the GWOT is being fought in Afghanistan & not in Pakistan, that’s exactly the question that many like myself have been asking for the past 8 yrs. Hopefully this incident will be an eye opener for the Obama administration & they rectify the mistake which was made by the bufoon called Bush in 2001.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Mortal: “The atmosphere in Pakistan has become so maliciously malevolent that it is also influencing Pakistanis living abroad.”

These are signs of decline. Hitler managed to rally almost all Germans behind his Nazi campaign that resulted in the slaughter of Jews and the invasion of nearby countries that led to world war 2. Pakistan is headed in that direction too. Radical elements have not disappeared and they are gaining strength with time. They probably will decide to get into mainstream politics inside Pakistan and take over power, just like Hitler did. Then they can infiltrate into every system of power inside Pakistan. Their military is already halfway there. Once they entrench themselves, they will eliminate all moderates and gain full control. They may sound just like some of the belligerent Pakistani posters here. The easiest way to control everything in Af-Pak is by controlling Pakistan. Right now they have relied on Pak military. A better plan for them would be to take over the Pak military itself. Then they get to dictate terms. They also have the nukes. Pakistan’s fledgling democracy is at risk. Its own military is at the risk of losing out to the radicals. This is like watching the spiraling fall into the center of a blackhole. Everything that was floating on the periphery begins to gain momentum and falls in the middle violently and while doing so emits dangerous radiation. What we are seeing is this radiation. The collapse will accelerate as the radicals pull everything towards themselves. One or more Mumbai style attacks will happen soon to alienate the moderate Indians and Pakistanis. Then the fall would happen. Let these radicals say what they want. Instead of looking at themselves, they have become blind folded and are blaming others for their miserable condition. They deserve the end they seek.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Myra,

Like sun is the source of all the energy, Pakistan is the source of all terror acts, terrorism in the world . Paki hands are frequently seen in all terror acts world over.

Posted by manishindia | Report as abusive
 

@ “And now we know he’s the son of a retired PAF Air Vice-Marshal. This just gets more and more interesting”
Posted by kEiThZ

Keith, good to see you back on the blog. Yes, it seems like the Pakistani non-state actors are being preached a lot of nonsense by their state actors. That was the case with David Headley as well. I wonder if this is the trend going forward; children born in Pakistani military families, who live in western countries, getting radicalized & resorting to terrorism in those countries.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

I was watching fox news the other day & one of their corrospondents in Pakistan mentioned that there were already numerous conspiracy theories floating in Pakistan that the NYC times square terror plot was planned by the US so that it can implicate, malign & pressurize Pakistan.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Leave it to western nations to clean up the garbage and trouble caused by extremists from some eastern nations.

Nobody on the eastern side is listening, they are too busy concocting conspiracy theories and wasting so much energy trying to deflect blame.

There is a fundamental culture in certain places the east it seems at times, to not want to accept responsibility, because it is easier to point the finger somewhere else than take full responsibility and accept shame.

Well, the west is blowing its cash to allow some eastern nations to indulge in shame avoidance, that is a luxury that we cannot keep affording to give away for free, just to appease the psyche of some.

@Keithz, it is time that monetary aid in Pakistan be tied to performance and delivery with respect to terrorism.

Also, the IMF and World Bank should jack up their interest rates if Pakistani Army cannot show true progress.

Pakistan’s terror problem can be fixed overnight, if the Bankers directly threaten the PA to get their act straightened out and deliver terrorists and extremists on a platter, en-masse, no exceptions.

I have a feeling that once the IMF starts asking for payments from the Bailout, Pakistani politicians are going to feel the heat.

Posted by G-W | Report as abusive
 

@Keithz, Mortal, KPSingh

Pakistan can be fixed, hard nosed, sledgehammer like monetary terms, can make Pakistan comply. In particular, the IMF needs to start dictating terms and how the cash is spent, if Pakistanis keep wanting free food and bullets.

Last I checked, Greek Government is being dictated to by the EU and Germany. Why should it be any different for Pakistan?

You want the cash, you spend it the way that we tell you.

All the IMF has to do, is dictate demolition of all terrorist extremist Madrassas, or no cash.

Posted by G-W | Report as abusive
 

G-W,
Greece is not an ideological state. “Pakistan” is.

Greece exists like any other country. “Pakistan” cannot be like Greece, any other country. The anointed one cannot be an ordinary country.

Its glory involves collecting ransom money from rest of the world, with a gun pointed to its head as pak columnist Irfan Hussain said.

Regards,

Posted by Seekeroftruth | Report as abusive
 

Leading question, maybe? From the quality of comments here, there isn’t much inspiration to draw on from either of the places mentioned in the headline.

Posted by HBC | Report as abusive
 

There’s nothing Pakistan-specific that made the guy terrorist. He could be as well an Arab like 9/11 perpetrators, or even home grown like the shoe bomber or Jose Padilla the dirty bomber. There’s one common denominator between these and numerous other acts of terror throughout the world. That common denominator is ISLAM.

Posted by An0nym0us | Report as abusive
 

Many things do indeed lead back to Pakistan – yet we treat them with kid gloves. They need a sucker punch in the old trade sanctions – till they clean up their act.

Posted by Butch_from_PA | Report as abusive
 

What inspired the bombing?
Have you turned on the t.v. lately? Perhaps if we didn’t have the media…then no one would care enough to blow us up.
Can we just go back to being the united states that takes care of itself and says to hell with everyone else.

Posted by crazyc133 | Report as abusive
 

Can we just go back to being the united states that takes care of itself and says to hell with everyone else.” crazy 133

In fact that is the root problem really. Why does the US think it can survive in a vacuum? Because it said to hell with everyone else and was deaf to the whole world, almost, except for all of 26 countries, it created the mess that is Iraq.

Maybe its time the US actually got down to thinking in collective terms rather than just thinking of itself and to hell with everyone else. That attitude creates more problems than it solves.

Posted by DaraIndia | Report as abusive
 

@ “Can we just go back to being the united states that takes care of itself and says to hell with everyone else.” crazy 133

You mean the way we were before 09-11-2001?
Isolating ourselves & becoming defensive again is not the solution. It’s about not getting carried away & making utterly stupid, unneccessary & costly mistakes like Iraq while staying on the offensive, identifying the sources which seek to destroy us & getting the world community on the same page. At the end of the day, you need to realize that even if isolated ourselves completely we weren’t involved in military action in any country, those that want to hate & destroy us will certainly find reasons to do so & 9-11 was a testament to that.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Myra:

@So the question that is likely to come up – and if past experience is anything to go by it will be a subject of much soul-searching and angry debate – is this: To what extent was Shahzad an “amateur” who had been radicalised in the United States in a way that may have prompted him to seek training or contacts with Pakistan-based militant groups? Or alternatively to what extent should Pakistan-based militant groups be seen as “exporting” their jihadi ideology abroad?”

Myra: Over the question of the Faisal Shahzad, the Pakistani-American accused in timesquare bombing, why it is that Pakistani, not Indian Muslims, are involved in this. Must have something to do with their countries of origin (Pakistan vs India). It may not be active training by militant networks, but it could be unconscious/conscious intake of information in such cases by virtue of being person of Pakistani origin

How many Indian kids (Muslims or else) have been implicated? How about looking from that angle?

Posted by RajeevK | Report as abusive
 

Sad part is all said and done the West will make sure Pakistan does not suffer sanctions to the extent being suggested here.

I will see it to believe that. Nothing inspires me to believe that the West will do that in foreseeable future.

Posted by RajeevK | Report as abusive
 

@ “How many Indian kids (Muslims or else) have been implicated? How about looking from that angle?”
Posted by RajeevK

I would also include Bangladeshis in that question, since that country’s muslim population is comparable to pakistan & india and they are in the same neighbourhood.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

@ “Sad part is all said and done the West will make sure Pakistan does not suffer sanctions to the extent being suggested here”

It is quite unfortunate that the impact of failed terror plots is nowhere near the ones that are successful. I’m sure that if even a few people would’ve been killed or even injured last satruday in times square, the picture would’ve been quite different today.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Mortal:

@I would also include Bangladeshis in that question, since that country’s muslim population is comparable to pakistan & india and they are in the same neighbourhood.”
—You are very right

Posted by RajeevK | Report as abusive
 

@Mortal1

Well said!

Posted by Seth | Report as abusive
 

The push-button war that CIA counter-terrorism Air Force is waging in Pakistan with its drones will have its consequences. The war has been taken back to streets of New York and until there is an end, it could have more consequences. Both Pakistan and US are allies and are working together on this investigation. Indians only found one more opportunity to spew their hatred towards Pakistan. Both Pakistan and US need to work on common interests and address their differences to build mutual trust to defeat terrorism.

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

Dear Indian friends
I had some problems with my DSL connection and just switched to my wirless backup, will be around to answer your propaganda. Good Luck! Be Safe!

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

@ “Dear Indian friends I had some problems with my DSL connection and just switched to my wirless backup, will be around to answer your propaganda. Good Luck! Be Safe!”
Posted by Umairpk

You be safe too buddy! But it’s kindda hard to be safe here, you know with the “non-state actors” from your country trying to blow us up and all. Anyways, see you around.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

The push-button war that CIA counter-terrorism Air Force is waging in Pakistan with its drones will have its consequences. The war has been taken back to streets of New York and until there is an end, it could have more consequences. Both Pakistan and US are allies and are working together on this investigation. Indians only found one more opportunity to spew their hatred towards Pakistan. Both Pakistan and US need to work on common interests and address their differences to build mutual trust to defeat terrorism.
Posted by Umairpk
—-

That’s a dangerous tone you are taking. I am curious why you think this individual’s actions were justified, given that he’s a (by any definition) middle to upper class Pakistani who has lived for years in the US and has scarcely (if at all) been impacted by the drone attacks in the tribal areas? Similar reasoning was used by the 9/11 attackers. Do you support this rationale?

You know damn well that those drone attacks take place with the complicity of your armed forces and government…which by your reasoning would also make bombings against your fellow citizens justified (see how that works?). You also know that those drone attacks would not be necessary if the Pakistani government and military had ensured that your tribal areas were not a threat to global peace and security (this isn’t just about the US, your “non-state actors” are now found in Afghanistan, Iraq, China, Russia, the Balkans, the Middle East, etc.).

And if we are to take this line of thinking further, are we to now consider Pakistan to be a hostile nation and all Pakistanis hostile to the West? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

“The push-button war that CIA counter-terrorism Air Force is waging in Pakistan with its drones will have its consequences. The war has been taken back to streets of New York and until there is an end, it could have more consequences” Posted by Umairpk

Your comment doesen’t surprise me since you have been known to support & justify terrorism and sympathize with terrorists. However, you equating drone attacks in Pakistan to terrorist attacks in america is egrigous for 2 main reasons:
Firstly, drone attacks inside Pakistan are done with the knowledge & approval of the Pakistani state wheras the last time I checked, no one has approved any terror attacks here. Secondly, it is indisputable that the drones target terrorists & terrorists only (remember Baitullah Mehsud?) & I don’t think Shehzad was targeting any terrorists in times square. In fact the military operation conducted by the Pakistani army has produced a lot more collateral damage than the drones ever have.

As for taking the war on the streets of America, you guys should really thank your lucky stars that the bomb in times square didn’t go off because if it would’ve, you guys would really be toast right now. So, as much as it is in america’s interest to protect it’s borders, it’s even more imortant for Pakistan that there are no more terror attacks in the US (successful or foiled) emanating from your soil because if that happens, you will face some serious consequences & retaliation & no one will be able to save you guys.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

@The war has been taken back to streets of New York and until there is an end, it could have more consequences.”
–Umairpk

—Oh, so you are making this terrorist a Lollywood hero of yours!!!

“taken back to the streets”!!! What an admiring tone and baseless to back it up (Ref to Keith’s post here).

It is hard to get a simple condemnation of a terrorist that does not kill a Pakistani. It is as simple as that.

@Indians only found one more opportunity to spew their hatred towards Pakistan.”
–I see Indians asking a question “why once again a Pakistani, not Bangladeshi or Indian involved in terrorism? I already see your answer: DRONES, which is ridiculous, but based on which you should not complain if one of these terrorists is trying to blow up someone in in Pakistani streets too.

Posted by RajeevK | Report as abusive
 

American journalists to assist terrorists when it comes to Russia

Nick Perumov, famous Russian fantasy-writer, who lives in the USA, in a recent interview described his impressions of how the American media had covered the terrorist attacks in Moscow subway on March 29, which took more than fifty lives.

According to Perumov, The New York Times with no hesitation wrote about terrorists, who killed Russian citizens, as “the Chechen freedom fighters”. “They are not called “terrorists” – but only “rebels”, “insurgents”, “guerrillas”, “partisans” and thus enter the noble context” – noted the writer.

You can watch Perumov’s interview here, but it’s in Russian. So, if anyone speaks Russian, you’re welcome.

“The New York Times” correspondent Clifford J. Levy (the author of the article) who has caused anger and bewilderment of the famous writer, is not alone in his sympathy to the terrorists.

“The Washington Post’s” Moscow bureau Chief Philip P. Pan has also successfully found allegoric names for terrorists. He calls them “suicide bombers” and, again, “Islamist insurgents”.

Different attitude of these “independent media” to terrorist activity causes at least bewilderment.

These media definitely qualify the explosions in Iraq, Afghanistan, Spain, India, the victims of which are innocent people, as terrorism, but similar bombings in Moscow is nothing but a struggle for freedom of “Islamist insurgents”, “rebels” and “separatists”. And measures to resist terrorism in such an ambiguous, confusing and far Russia are served by these media as “brutal suppression of the insurgency of the North Caucasus.”

The spread of the information justifying the terrorists or assisting the terrorists is equal to supporting terrorism in every civilized state.

Are C. Levy and P. Pan’s actions just the result of their incompetence or not knowing Russian reality? It is hard to believe. Both of them hold high ranks in the journalism hierarchy. Both of them had held offices in other countries before going to Moscow bureau of their newspapers. Both of them realize for sure that if they wrote like that about Muslim, Christian or Jewish terrorism in the US, it would certainly have a negative impact on their journalist careers.

It’s really strange that in spite of the sympathy expressed by President Barack Obama with terrorist attacks in Moscow subway and calling for Russia to take part in the war against al-Qaeda in Afghanistan, the U.S. newspapers keep on publishing their own opinion that smells like assisting terrorism? And in this case who is the customer of these materials published in the media?

Posted by Grag_Winter | Report as abusive
 

The key points in the puzzle are missing. What the Fox News and the likes are not stating that the guy went to Pakistan and then to Afghanistan and received his training in Afghanistan with the help of the American special forces trainers. No wonder that he was unable to complete the DIY job. There are other cases like him in Afghanistan who equally turned on the British forces after receiving training from the British trainers? Let us stop kidding ourself, the guy< is not even charged yet. Every Pashtoon child in Afghanistan starts learning to shoot at the age of five years, and here we are being told that the US and NATO military is going to train the new Afghan Army? Afghhanistan is not Iraq!
Rex Minor

Posted by pakistan | Report as abusive
 

@Grag
Now you got it, the terrorism has to be quatified.
Bill clinton had the missiles fired at Afghanistan is not classufied as terrorism, since Mr Bin Laden was stationed there who apparently was involved in attacks on the US ship. The group that attacked on sept. 11 were considered terrorists because the USA had not attacked an Arab State. George W attack on Afghanistan demandsing Bin Laden from the Taliban Govt. got it all confused since it was the Afghans who were involved in New York. One has to allow a space for the resistance fighters whose land is under occupation or under attack. The Chechanians, the kashmirirs,the maoists, the temils, the Palestinians and the afghans need to be given a place among the resistance fighters. This is not my opinion nor would it make any difference on the ground, but the thoughts are that their struggle is limited and likely to disappear as soon as the matter is resilved politically and the occupation or suppression ends. The resistance do not have norms or morals. Let us not blame the media in general for this, though there are some who do not always adopt a neutral position.
Rex MInor

Posted by pakistan | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
  •