Comments on: Guest contribution-Pakistan’s response to the floods http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/ Perspectives on Pakistan Thu, 01 Oct 2015 19:31:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: pakistan http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-32512 Sun, 19 Sep 2010 14:21:59 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-32512 The greatest contribution India could make towards Pakistan is to make life easier for the muslims of India. They could support UNO efforts if they so choose.
Incidently I saw a live program on TV from Germany to help Pakistani flood victims and witnessed the collection of many millions from the private contributors. The aid was to be given to NGOs and not the Zardari gillani Govt. of Pakistan.
Rex Minor

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By: kEiThZ http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-32100 Thu, 26 Aug 2010 21:46:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-32100 Pakistanis better get used to seeking aid from wherever it comes.

This is just one flood in one monsoon season. The damage done by the floods to the existing flood controls is certainly not going to be repaired by the next monsoon. And weakened flood controls mean Pakistan is going to be even more prone to flooding in the years to come.

All, as various geopolitical issues around Pakistan are starting to come to ahead and donor fatigue with respect to Pakistan is setting in.

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By: Mortal1 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31969 Mon, 23 Aug 2010 03:39:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31969 @”My dream situation is of a recent graduate from Pakistan asking his parents for advice. He has got two job offers, one in Lahore and one in Bangalore…..”
Posted by prasadgc

I hope this dream can be realized in our lifetime. Unfortunately, a humbling reality points us towards an India, where extremist nut-jobs like the Thakreys (in Maharashtra) aren’t even willing to accomodate non-maharshtrian Indians, let alone Pakistanis and a Pakistan, where the Muhajirs are still searching for a Pakistani identity, more than 60 years after leaving India for Pakistan. But nevertheless, let’s keep the faith!

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By: Seth http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31966 Mon, 23 Aug 2010 03:15:36 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31966 “Paradoxically, even though I don’t wish any ill to Pakistan, it may be a good thing for Pakistan to face a severe economic crunch that forces them to abandon their quest for military vengeance. To be fair, maybe it’s a good thing for India to feel the pressure of Kashmir and the Maoist insurgency.”

Well said Ganesh! Governments of both countries have kind of fooled its people using hostility as a shield and have got away with broken system and structure. Unless under pressure, this “chalta hai” (anything goes) attitude has caused so much opportunity loss for the people. Having said that, Pakistani establishment would do a great job of showing sincerity by putting Mumbai handlers behind bars. India, on the other hand, should definitely reciprocate by resuming the composite peace process immediately.

But we all know that these things are easier said than done unless people who are in charge are under REAL pressure. If it takes massive floods for ISI to utter that India is not Pakistan’s biggest threat, I see it as Godsend for the long run. We still need to establish the Indian equivalent but unfortunately, prosperity hides the vices. More of Slumdog Millionaire Mr. Danny Boyle?

PS: Congratulations to regulars now that this blog looks like a decent read.

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By: prasadgc http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31961 Sun, 22 Aug 2010 22:18:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31961 Thanks for your kind words, JumperCable.

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

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By: prasadgc http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31960 Sun, 22 Aug 2010 21:58:51 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31960 I was in college in 1979 when the Chinese attacked Vietnam, the USSR sent some supplies to Vietnam but did not get actively involved. There was a comment from the Chinese side that after that, Vietnamese support for the USSR would reduce from 100% to perhaps 80%.

Jackden said:

> What did China do when the flood struck Pakistan? It immediately brought the Chinese workers from Pakistan to China. […] I am still looking for an answer to this big puzzle, why China is YET to offer substantial amount of aid to its friend Pakistan, when Pakistan is desperately looking for all sort of aid.

That’s one of the reasons why I believe India should have been quicker off the mark and offered more to assist in the Pakistan floods. Pakistanis should be able to see that at a time of trouble, they can only expect their own ‘biradari’ (however estranged) to help, and not some stranger. [Is the word ‘biradari’ related to ‘brother’, I wonder.]

It may not be a bad thing if Pakistanis’ support for China dropped from 100% to perhaps 80% after seeing the way China has responded to their crisis :-). I believe China is cynically propping up Pakistan against India because it’s a strategic nightmare for Beijing if South Asia ever comes together in peace and becomes a larger rival. Ditto the US until now. Now the US wants India-Pakistan peace to counterbalance China. Perhaps when India and Pakistan see how other world powers fear their coming together, they will realise they’ve been had.

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

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By: prasadgc http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31959 Sun, 22 Aug 2010 21:21:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31959 KPSingh01,

You have certainly listed good ideas for normalisation of relations. However, what you outlined is only possible when there is a formal peace agreement (of the kind Musharraf was about to sign) where both countries are satisfied with the terms. Right now, if elements on the Pakistani side believe that their grievances (e.g., Kashmir) have not been properly redressed, then they will only try and sabotage these peace-making efforts.

And as we have seen from the Col Purohit episode, India is not lacking in such elements either. It reminds me of the Star Trek movie “The Undiscovered Country”, where both humans and Klingons conspire together to prevent peace between their civilisations, so great is their emotional dependence on a state of war.

There has to be “agreement” first. It’s OK even if both sides agree to discuss Kashmir later. But they must both agree. Without agreement, the rest will not happen.

The key to this is Gen Kayani. Only the military can carry the rest of the country along, because the civilian politicians have little credibility over there. If he is courageous, we can hope to see a breakthrough agreement. If he remains trapped in traditional PakMil thinking, we will remain mired in one of the most pointless antagonistic relations the world has known.

Paradoxically, even though I don’t wish any ill to Pakistan, it may be a good thing for Pakistan to face a severe economic crunch that forces them to abandon their quest for military vengeance. To be fair, maybe it’s a good thing for India to feel the pressure of Kashmir and the Maoist insurgency. It’s only when governments are under pressure that they will be desperate enough to seek a breakthrough and willing to make concessions. Otherwise life will go on as before and the common people will miss out on the tremendous opportunities that come from peace.

My dream situation is of a recent graduate from Pakistan asking his parents for advice. He has got two job offers, one in Lahore and one in Bangalore, and is undecided. His parents without batting an eye advise him to take up the Bangalore offer as it pays more or offers better prospects and promise to visit him every six months because it’s not that far. Another situation is a retired couple from India deciding to settle in Islamabad because it’s more affordable than New Delhi. That’s the extent to which relations should be normal.

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

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By: JumperCable http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31958 Sun, 22 Aug 2010 18:55:03 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31958 I have to give it to you Umair. I have been following your exchanges with the people on here. You have been consistent and have stuck to your guns for a long time (to all commentators from across the border, this is a figurative reference only please). You are one sensible and brave Pakistani.

As for our eastern neighbors, I would like to be the first to acknowledge that the humanitarian aid you have given us is very much appreciated. No matter what the intent or the behind the scene activities that brought it about, I am not really concerned at the moment. Pakistan in this hour of need will and should accept any/all the help it can get, even with some reasonable conditions.

However, it is not very gracious nor reasonable to give charity and then expect an immediate response from Pakistan in the form of a resolution on all disputed business between the two countries. Let Pakistan stand firmly back on its feet and I am sure one not too distant a day Pakistan will also reply in kind.

There will be a time when you can go back to slinging mud at Pakistan again, however right now my people need all the support they can get. If you can find it in your heart to look at them not as Pakistanis but as human beings -most of whom don’t even know nor care about the Pakistan-India politics- then please give generously. If not, that is okay with us too. Just don’t lecture us on the sanctity of Indian lives and yet look at the drowning men, women and children as if they deserved to drown, just because they are not humans but Pakistanis.

I would also take this opportunity to thank Ganesh Maharaj for his gracious contribution and promise of continued support. I have always admired your level headed responses here. I don’t always agree with you, but I understand and respect what you are saying.

-JC

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By: KPSingh01 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31957 Sun, 22 Aug 2010 15:54:43 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31957 One way to break out of deadlock is to start on a new front. Simply keep aside all the issues that cause the deadlock and start developing new fronts between the two countries. These new fronts should be based on co-operation rather than competition. The latter simply enhances hostility due to the volatile nature of the relationships built. There should be a new front opened on business infrastructure development between the two countries. India can offer tax breaks to Pakistani products. Pakistan can allow Indian business houses to visit, survey and set up manufacturing and other infrastructure building business. Farmers in Indian Punjab should be able to lease lands in Pakistan and produce fruits and vegetables for import to India. Pakistan trucks can deliver them. Both countries can withdraw their troops from their current positions at the same time in an open manner. Sports and arts interactions can be intensified. I’d love to see Wasim Akram as a bowling coach for a state cricket team in India. Both countries should engage each other’s security systems for helping in disaster relief and maintaining key installations. Town hall meetings need to be set up everywhere where prominent people from both countries talk to the locals with a clear mission of dispelling all myth and paranoia created. Both countries should plan on a step by step confidence building measures over a certain period of time. Reconciliation is the only way out. Confrontation has shown clearly that it does not work. Indian election commission can help its Pakistani counterpart in setting up electronic voting technology. Both RAW and the ISI can work jointly on chasing drug trafficking, mafia, flesh trade etc. Both countries should work hard on setting up mutual dependence. This will thwart any inclination towards confrontation. All this will pave way for a EU like set up in the future. We all have to do something so that our future generations can live in a better atmosphere.

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By: 777xxx777 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2010/08/19/guest-contribution-pakistans-response-to-the-floods/comment-page-2/#comment-31954 Sun, 22 Aug 2010 06:28:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=5975#comment-31954 Umair has made some very constructive and realistic points. It is a pleasure to see such comments from a Pakistani. And I have not an iota of doubt about entrepreneurial skills of people in Pakistan specially in sindh, a group of people known worldwide for their business skills, guess thats why Karachi is financial hub in Pakistan. That is why i firmly believe in free trade between india and pakistan. Let their be competition of quality of human life where everyone is a winner.
In one of my comments on other blogs i said that best for kashmir in india is to have a scotland-britain like arrangement where kashmir has full autonomy on land laws and commerce while the currency, defence and external affairs are same as india..same goes for kashmir on pakistan side and then LOC is interpreted as “Lifeline Of Commerce”. I believe this trouble is not only for kashmir but many other states in india where people have a feeling of being oppressed by central system. This was a blunder in my opinion of part of chacha Nehru who wanted a highly centralised system for the union. In US, UK they have a highly federal system where states get to decide on their own laws and commerce policies while central government only takes care of currency, defence and external affairs.
This centralised system in india has created more problems than solutions for us. And to change it is a herculean task in itself as it will require structural change to constitution of india. And even more difficult because of the greed of the people sitting in parliament of india. But for last decade or so the parliament has slowly got the message that people now want peace and not war, people want progress, prosperity, health and wealth in india. And i believe that parliament people in pakistan are equally corrupt and greedy, if not more, as those in india. But like india people of pakistan will eventually push their leaders to move towards peace and not war. And it is the educated and learned class of people like Umair who will lead the revolution called Pakistan.
Let we all win…

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