Comments on: Egypt and Pakistan; something borrowed, something new http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/ Perspectives on Pakistan Thu, 01 Oct 2015 19:31:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: pakistan http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36220 Wed, 23 Feb 2011 20:44:39 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36220 @Arab Youth Revolution

The next one to go down(col Gadhafi is in the different ball game) in the Arab World seems to the yemanese President whowas taking orders from the American Govt. in war against terrorism. American foreign policy is in tatters, two people(Obama and Hillary) with different strategies and now forced by the events which the CA was not in position to imagine. This revolution is like a Bush fire which is developing with such a speed that even the 24hr cable net work cannot catch up. Aljazeera with their massive staff and knowledge of language have beaten all others.

Rex Minor

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By: 777xxx777 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36148 Fri, 18 Feb 2011 02:01:45 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36148 It will be interesting to see how Saudis react to developments in Egypt. Will youth in Saudi do an Egypt style revolution and will Saudi king try to crush it with force. World is watching. Anxiously!!

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By: pakistan http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36140 Thu, 17 Feb 2011 06:07:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36140 Humanity and civilisation are synanymous and do not exist without dignty. People in Tunisia and Egypt have risen to regain dignity; yes DIGNITY and then freedom and jobs. The arabs are rising to recover their dignity, which their despot rulers have sacrificed during the 20th century for more or less personal gains. Those who loose their dignity, have a shabby legacy and no standing in History. Are there parallels among other Nations and people in this world? Certainly!! Each country and people have to decide for themselves if they have a shortfall in their dignity or not? Pakistan must decide for themselves if they treasure this phenomna ‘DIGNITY’ and how it has to be recovered. People must not be forced to take the law in their own hands!! 2011 is definitely to go in History as the year when the Arab youth rose to regain DIGNITY!

Rex Minor

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By: KPSingh01 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36102 Mon, 14 Feb 2011 20:47:36 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36102 It is heartening to see the youth in many Middle Eastern countries taking to streets and fighting over rigid establishment. It almost feels like the early 1990s when the Soviet Union collapsed and the Berlin wall came down, leading to a wave of independent nations, overthrow of dictatorships across Eastern Europe. And this whole thing has happened on its own without any external push. Technology definitely played a part in triggering this revolution. Iran is feeling the heat. So is Yemen. I hope the youth fight against the theocratic establishments, dictators and other types of conservative leaders to bring about a new change and hope. China is watching this whole thing nervously. But China has the capability to crush any uprising and the rest of the world cannot do anything about it. I hope Pakistani youth take to the streets and fight the radicals head on. That is the only hope.

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By: Mortal1 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36101 Sun, 13 Feb 2011 18:36:40 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36101 @”I believe there’s some other mysterious hold that “Pakistan has over the US, and I struggle to understand what that is.” Posted by prasadgc

The US is paying a price for the mistakes it has made wrt Pakistan. All these years, it propped up Pakistan’s military, neglected it after the Afghan war & allowed it to build nukes. The threat which started, primarily with AlQaeda, has morphed into a much bigger threat from various other groups based in Pakistan. Since 9/11, the cancer which should have been contained, has been allowed to spread due to the stupid decisions of turning towards Iraq instead of concentrating on Af-Pak & trusting the Pakistani army. What we have now, is a precarious situation where the Pakistanis are turning hostile & the threat from jihadi groups is bigger than ever. Add nukes to the mix & Pakistan resembles a criminal in the room with a gun pointing towards it’s head & bombs strapped around his waist, demanding a ransom. IMO, the US & allies have no option except wage a concentrated military action in Pakistan (with or without the support of the Pakistani army) & inflict irreparable damage to the terror infrastructure in that country. If they withdraw from Af-Pak without doing this, I suspect they will be back there very soon after another 9/11 in the US/west.

@”Is it a geopolitical strategy to prop up a counterweight to India? After all, if Pakistan collapses, India becomes the unquestioned South Asian hegemon, right?”

The comparison between India & Pakistan starts & ends with nukes. The US & the global community does not hyphenate India with Pakistan any more. Instead India is hyphenated with China & Pakistan with Afghanistan. It’s been obvious for a few years now (especially since the US-India nuclear deal) that the US considers India as a counterweight to china & Pakistan is nowhere in the eaquation.

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By: KPSingh01 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36100 Sun, 13 Feb 2011 17:30:42 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36100 Pakistan thus was created for strategic reasons in South Asia – to counter balance any chance of independent India becoming a power and facilitate enough centrifugal force inside to keep it busy. The primary reason at the time of independence was to create a garrison for staging any kind of defense to block the expansion of Russia. The fears of the colonial empires and the succeeding super power were justified when USSR (which replaced the Tsarist empire) walked into Afghanistan.

If one reads the persistent anti Indian stance in UK sites like the Guardian and Reuters, one can realize that colonial sentiments are still present. India has frustrated them quite a bit by still being around and emerging as a power despite all the machinations. Kashmir was left unsettled to throttle India periodically. Kashmir is the valve using which India has been somewhat contained.

The rise of radical Islam, Islamic militancy etc happened mostly in the 1990s where the Af-Pak region was left like a muddy pond that allowed these mosquitoes to breed and multiply.

The colonial powers and the US could not contain Pakistan building its nukes. They grossly underestimated the potential of the natives in developing the needed technology. In addition, containing the Soviets took precedence over everything else, as this was a golden opportunity not only to avenge them for Vietnam, but also to bleed them to their demise.

The sudden loss of a big enemy has hurt the US deeply as well. After the collapse of the USSR, the need for cold war defensive approach has lost its meaning. This has led to defense budget cuts, lay offs, emergence of other nations as economic powers, ad basically has hurt the US badly. Therefore the emergence of Islamic terrorism is a great opportunity for it to rebuild its muscles. Super powers need an enemy to stay healthy. They’d love to be in a dead lock with their enemies so that they can use that justification to build their muscles. So they are not going to destroy this enemy that quickly. China can be the next enemy. But that is a few more years away. For now, Islamic terrorism has become the next big thing. It will be propped up and kept alive to sustain geo-political interests.

In this new alignment, Pakistan will become a part of the enemy camp ground. During cold war, it was on the side of the US. This time, it will be on the opposite side. In addition, the sudden explosion of people’s power in the Middle East will be a major cause for worry to the US. They do not want any chaos there at this juncture. While they pay lip service to democracy, freedom etc for others, they are hurting deep inside about losing Mubarak in Egypt. If Al Qaeda changes its strategy and starts triggering similar revolutions in other pro-US Muslim countries, it will derail the Americans a lot more. Of course Al Qaeda will do it in its own way – eliminate anyone who can become potential US ally, cause more public frustration in order to alienate them from the pro-American governments.

These are all long term strategic wars, where sometimes real battles are staged. Most of the time these wars are fought over many fronts diplomatic means, revolutions, terrorism, economic strains and so on. Weakening the enemy over a period of time has become the main strategy. From that stand point, Al Qaeda still has an upper hand.

They are surely eyeing Pakistanis hundreds of nukes. All they need is an anti-US revolution in Pakistan, overthrow of all pro-American generals and politicians and spread of radicalism. I am sure they are working on it. If they manage to accomplish that, Pakistan will be on their hands. They will rule through ideological means, without being directly on power. They did this in Afghanistan by means of Taliban rule. Pakistan has enough sympathy and support for Al Qaeda. Anti-American sentiments will be propped up even more. Wait for the diplomatic war between US and Pakistan over the American in custody there to escalate.

Al Qaeda has managed to stay put with the goal of slowly transforming Pakistan into a radical place and reaching far inside its guts. It has been working on infesting Pakistan. The goal is simple – instead of relying Pak military for support, which can be an unpredictable matter, why not control it by means of elements well planted inside its military? Once they achieve that they will go to war with India for sure. It will be with nukes and it will be on Kashmir.

This is like a cancer. It takes the first victim and consumes it completely. From there it is very easy for it to spread around. The US has created a much bigger enemy to take out another. They may not have time for China anymore. Things are on the edge.

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By: Umairpk http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36099 Sun, 13 Feb 2011 12:45:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36099 Ganesh:

Find me a country in the world that is 180 million, has hundereds of nuclear weapons, a well trained significant military, is a muslim nation, and some terrorist groups like Al-qaeda try to find refuge there(obviously not supported by Pakistan). Pakistan has it all, it is the strategic importance, and it is probably the only country whose stability, directly relates to that of US. Anything goes wrong in Pakistan it would affect US. Also correct, US will never let India become the sole power in the region, to an extent Pakistan will be propped up.
You do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand how Pakistan matters in a number of ways. It is vital that Pakistan’s Army remains strong and cohesive, is able to defend nuclear arsenal. Also, the country’s economy improves, its people meet the challenges faced by the country. If a huge muslim nation like Pakistan implodes, it will create nightmares for US and its interests of stable region will be shattered. That is why Pakistan continues to matter.
Coming to Raymond Davis affair, in a big country like Pakistan, it made story but their are other things to worry about.

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By: prasadgc http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36098 Sat, 12 Feb 2011 22:18:57 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36098 I was going to say Pakistan has a Svengali-like hold over the US (and follow that up with a Seinfeld-ian comment on “Svenjolly”), but I hesitated for a moment. I winced at the thought that it would bring the vitriolic comments of CommonSensLogic, Janeallen and jo5319 crashing down upon us (they travel in a pack and are probably the same person).

But what the hell? One can’t let fatwas curb freedom of speech!

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

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By: prasadgc http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36097 Sat, 12 Feb 2011 21:58:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36097 > How about doing a story on the Raymond Davis fiasco? […] After all, this could very well be the final nail in the coffin of US-Pakistan relations.

I second that! The Davis affair is the most crucial Pakistan-related development of the last few weeks and it’s incredible that it hasn’t so far merited a piece on this blog.

On the topic of US-Pakistan relations, I understand Pakistan’s dependence on the US (the economy would collapse without the life support of US aid) but confess I cannot understand the nature of US dependence on Pakistan. What exactly are the aims of the “War on Terror” anyway, for which Pakistan’s cooperation is essential? The Taliban have no ambitions beyond Af-Pak and are what I would call Saddam Hussain-class villains, i.e., bad guys who still don’t provide enough of an excuse to invade a country.

Al Qaeda is more of a credible reason for staying, but even that is more a question of “face” than national security, I think. The US can’t be seen as retreating without punishing those responsible for 9/11. But doesn’t that simply mean that if Osama bin Laden is captured tomorrow (heh, like that’ll ever happen), it’ll be a sufficiently symbolic success for the US to declare victory and go home? Once they leave, they can throttle all hostile forces in the Af-Pak region by stopping aid and imposing a quarantine on people from the region. It’s a cheaper and cleaner solution than fighting a war that has delivered very questionable results.

No, I believe there’s some other mysterious hold that Pakistan has over the US, and I struggle to understand what that is. Is it a geopolitical strategy to prop up a counterweight to India? After all, if Pakistan collapses, India becomes the unquestioned South Asian hegemon, right?

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

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By: Mortal1 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/2011/02/09/egypt-and-pakistan-something-borrowed-something-new/comment-page-1/#comment-36096 Sat, 12 Feb 2011 20:11:22 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/pakistan/?p=6866#comment-36096 Myra,

How about doing a story on the Raymond Davis fiasco? I think that’s at least a little more important than a story on a separatist kashmiri leader who was hanged 27 yrs ago. After all, this could very well be the final nail in the coffin of US-Pakistan relations.

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