In Pakistan, bewilderment

May 6, 2011

Cyril Almeida at Dawn has written a powerful and anguished column about the bewilderment among many Pakistanis on discovering that Osama bin Laden had been hiding in Abbottabad, a garrison town in the heart of the country and home to the Pakistan Military Academy.

“It’s too frightening to make sense of. The world’s most-wanted terrorist. A man who triggered the longest war in American history. The terrorist mastermind the world’s only superpower has moved heaven and earth to track down. A decade of hunting. Hundreds of billions of dollars spent. The blood of countless Americans and others spilled. And when he was finally found, he was found wrapped in the bosom of the Pakistani security establishment.”

“Did they know he was here? Surely, they knew he was here? Nobody has come out and said it openly yet. It’s too early, the story still unfolding. Ask the question in private, though, and with hand on heart, no one will say anything but, yes, they knew he was there,” he wrote.  “Grim questions are etched on anxious faces, but so is fear of the answers. Proud men and women, people who love and serve their country, have cried as they connect yet another dot in the horrifying trajectory this country is on.”

The mixed messages given out in public or private after President Barack Obama announced on Monday that U.S. forces had flown unnoticed deep into  Pakistan and killed bin Laden, have left many dazed about what really happened. Had Pakistan at least helped in some way by providing the intelligence that  led to bin Laden? President Barack Obama had specifically mentioned counter-terrorism cooperation with Pakistan.  Or did Pakistanis have to face up to the possibility that the Americans had acted entirely alone — hoodwinking the country’s powerful army — and that perhaps, as Almeida writes, “they knew he was there”.

A government statement said that the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency ”had been sharing information with CIA and other friendly intelligence agencies since 2009″ about the compound where bin Laden was killed. But that statement, described by columnist Ejaz Haider as “nonsense at its most nonsensical” was even more confusing — if the ISI knew about the compound in 2009, why did it not take action?

Towards the end of the week, the “authorised” version of events filtered out from a briefing given by Pakistan Army chief General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani to senior Pakistani journalists.

Pakistan had not known in advance about the U.S. plans, but nor had it known that bin Laden was there, wrote Time magazine’s Omar Waraich, who had spoken to some of those present at the briefing. “Kayani was adamant that the Pakistanis had no idea that bin-Laden was hiding in Abbottabad. “We had no clear, actionable information on Osama bin-Laden,” he told the journalists. “If we had it, we would have acted ourselves. No one would have questioned our performance for ten years. It would have raised our international prestige.”

Najam Sethi at The Friday Times in his account of what appeared to be the same briefing, gave the first properly coherent explanation of how the United States and Pakistan had managed to square the circle of saying they had shared intelligence while acting alone.   It’s worth quoting at length, since in the weeks and months ahead, this is likely to be the story that will have to survive scrutiny if the two countries are to carry on working together — something both countries need to do in their own interests, irrespective of the distrust.

“Sometime in 2009, an ISI wiretap picked up a conversation in Arabic between a Sim card in Nowshera and another in Saudi Arabia. The conversation was brief and hinted at financial matters. This transcript was passed on to the CIA for processing. Three months later, in 2010, the same Sim woke up to another conversation in Arabic, this time from Peshawar to Saudi Arabia. Again, the transcript was passed on to the CIA. There were four other occasions that year when the same Sim was used, once from a location in Waziristan and the last one actually from the compound in Abbotabad, and all the transcripts and location details were passed on to the CIA. The ISI took the view that its Intel apparatus was focused on the Pashto or Punjabi speaking Taliban in FATA and elsewhere in the country and Arabic speaking Al-Qaeda terrorists were the responsibility of the CIA.

“Meanwhile, the CIA analysed the transcripts and followed all the clues until the last one led them to the compound in Abbotabad. When the CIA homed in on it in February via ground and satellite surveillance in 2011, it was convinced that a very high value target was living in it, possibly OBL. They found it unbelievable because of its location in the military’s backyard. The consensus view was that an exclusive and secret operation should be launched to get their man because the ISI couldn’t be trusted with a joint operation. The CIA just wasn’t sure whether the ISI was hiding OBL because it was the ISI that had provided the lead to the Sim card and transcripts that led the CIA to the compound in Abbotabad.

“This explains two statements made by senior US officials. President Obama said the operation benefited from “counterterrorism cooperation with Pakistan’s Intel agencies that led the CIA to the compound in which OBL was living”. The CIA chief said they couldn’t mount a joint operation because they didn’t want leaks in the ISI by rogue elements to jeopardize it.”

The explanation has an internal coherence and brings together the U.S. and Pakistani narratives that they had shared intelligence, even as the United States later acted alone.  It does not begin to give all the answers, but it does provide some useful details to work on.

 In 2010, for example, the ISI, according to this explanation, picked up a conversation in Arabic from a particular SIM card.  That same SIM card was used “once from a location in Waziristan and the last one actually from the compound in Abbottabad”.  It’s terribly easy to criticise other people’s mistakes in hindsight, but what would you conclude if you had a link between an Arabic speaker, Waziristan, and the compound?  Leave it to the CIA?

Or was this a question of an overworked junior officer failing to join the dots? With every new explanation we get, more questions need to be asked.

Comments

Myra wrote “Or was this a question of an overworked junior officer failing to join the dots?”

We have been waiting for Myra’s analysis. And she hasn’t disappointed. Along predictable lines!!

In the last 5 days, this is the best write up I have read (including pak media), where she has managed to slip in sufficient spin to give an impression ISI was not actually hoisting OBL, but just there must have beem some “intelligence
failure”.

Even if we accept this spin, letting OBL live right next to Pak military academy in a cantonment town demonstrates the incompetency of ISI/PA.

It is worthwhile to remember, after successfully launching Mumbai terrorist attacks, paks gloated to Indians on our incompetence on intellgence gathering.

Posted by netizen | Report as abusive
 

The ISI is desperately trying to prove it’s innocence with a bunch of lies. I read in the stratfor file (provided on the other thread) that an ISI officer said that they had reported the Bin Laden house to the CIA back in 2004. When asked about this, the CIA said that the house did not exist until 2005 & before that it was just vacant land.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Trust Myra to give the benefit of a non-existent doubt to the ISI.

Posted by SilverSw0rd | Report as abusive
 

ISI and CIA have worked together for decades, first in Soviet Afghan war, and after US invasion of Afghanistan in 2001. Similarlo, OBL was no stranger to the area, he had been around since 1980s, that time in Peshawar area and Afghanistan etc. All the players knew each other very well, CIA did no favor by getting a monster it created in first place.
Now that the operation is done, its aftermath is devastating in every way. The distrust between US and Pakistan is at its worst. People in Pakistan did not shed tears for OBL, nor does majority adhere to his veiws. But the way this covert operation was carried out is a humiliation and insult. It is for Pakistan military to review its cooperation with US.

The work of intelligence agencies is often painstakingly slow, they have to track, conduct surviellence, deploy resources, make a lot of effort in order to show progress on a single lead. This much should be understood, If CIA had sophisticated technology, it should share with allies.

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

“People in Pakistan did not shed tears for OBL”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/20 11/may/04/bin-laden-protests-pakistan-vi deo

How many more lies Umair?

First your country claimed Bin Laden was not in Pakistan.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/04/world/ asia/04britain.html

Then with egg on the face, a claim was made that Pakistan did not know Bin Laden was hiding there:

http://blog.al.com/wire/2011/05/pakistan _we_did_not_know_osama.html

And there was enough intelligence available even during Musharraf’s time that
Bin Laden was hiding in Abbotabad.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/may  /05/osama-bin-laden-afghan-intelligence -abbottabad-lead

There is no use playing innocent. It is as obvious as the sun that Pakistan’s military and its ISI have worked hand in glove with Taliban and Al Qaeda. ISI kept Bin Laden in this safe house, just like it has in the case of other Al Qaeda leaders, Taliban leaders and Dawood Ibrahim.

Pakistan has become the Mecca of global Islamic terrorism. All terrorists and their acts abroad have been traced back to Pakistan till date. Pakistan is not fighting terrorism. It has bred it and nurtured it. It is pretending to be fighting terrorism because of American presence. It is playing the role of the arsonist on one side and is pretending to be a fire fighter at the same time. Pakistan made no sacrifice here. It is paying the price for what it has been doing surreptitiously.

Good try Myra and Umair.

Kindly do not try to cover up the stuff that has hit the ceiling fan. Just let it go. More embarrassment is coming. Brace for it. Myra must have struggled for a week or so after seeing Pakistan being exposed like this. So after a quiet period, one sees an article justifying Pakistan’s ridiculous excuses.

ISI has been hiding Bin Laden in Pakistan all these years. US now has taken all the tapes, hard drives and memory sticks. More truth will emerge.

I have nothing against you being proud of your country. But it has done evil things to the world. One cannot deny it at all costs. Truth is absolute.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Suspicions are growing by the day.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/07/world/ asia/07policy.html?_r=1&hp

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 
 

When trying to add spin to the unfolding events, Author’s such a Myra should be careful not to use overdoeses for such events, which will make them bigger fools and destroys the credibility of the Author.

Once can understand people like umair arguing desperately for his country but its unreasonable for an author to add spin contrary to the common sense which is so evident of course unless they have thier own interests in their mind, which will allow them to take the risk on their credibility.

Even if one assumes ISI had passed on some information regarding OBL in the past, it may have been to secure themselves from the extreme criticism or to guard agaist heavy blowback if the Americans realized pakistan had been harbouring OBL all this long. They may claim innocence saying that “had it been so, why would we be sharing that little information on OBL?” . A sort of an alibi to rescue themselves from criticism from Internation Community.
The line had got even blurred between Myra and Pakistan establishment so much so that we may as well read Myra’s comments to understand the Pakistani Official line!

I wondered Pakistani state edifice is standing on three pillars of 3A’s the Army (military establishment which is the actual arbiter and only viable institution),Allah (using religion to unite people) and America (Not to lose america at any cost) but a fourth unseen pillar is of Hatred for India (literal hatred with no holds barred hatred reached with spin on historical, theological, cultural and what not) Now I think it has added another pillar and that is nurturing and abetting world’s most wanted people in order to blackmail foreign governments into submission. This is handy as it can frighten people into providing Aid and can push the existence of state a little longer. But this policy will only result in constant destabilisation and can never become a source of stablity for the state and region at large.

Posted by sensiblepatriot | Report as abusive
 

The question is that if the ISI realised in 2009 about the SIM card and passed it on because of Arabic content to the US on the ground that this was not concerning Taliban but the AQ, are we to infer that there was no responsibility with Pakistan about fighting the AQ? Sounds rather bizzare to me. I thought they had said that they too were in on the hunt for OBL. I thought they were allies in the fight against terror and not just limited to Pashto Punjabi speaking Taliban. (This is what I call terrific Afridi type spin). Even after the last transmission was picked up from Abbotabad, in the heart of a Pakistani garrison town, the ISE blithely passed it on. It did not bother them one bit or make them wary that something was brewing right under their very nose?

Yet the major question really has been untouched – 5 years??? Ejaz Haider is bang on the button ““nonsense at its most nonsensical”.

Lets face it, almost every major AQ guy caught so far has been hiding in Pakistan. If anyone doubts Pakistan’s involvement or proclaims non-involvement has a major credibility problem on their hands. Pakistan is a safe haven – or is that also still in doubt?

The fact is OBL was Pakistan’s insurance to continued dollars and weapons, why would they give him up and why wouldn’t they hide him? The reaction now in the US over aid to Pakistan is proof. With screws being tightened the claws are being bared.

Posted by DaraIndia | Report as abusive
 

Umair,

“But the way this covert operation was carried out is a humiliation and insult. It is for Pakistan military to review its cooperation with US.”
“This much should be understood, If CIA had sophisticated technology, it should share with allies”

This is amusing. Just 10 days ago you were gloatingly telling us how Pakistan has turned the tables on the US. What kind of allies are these? Each one seems to be in it only for what and how much one can squeeze out from the other.

Posted by DaraIndia | Report as abusive
 

1. After sacrificing our 32K civilians, and 5K soldiers and paramilitary/police men and bearing the burnt of being pushed to civil war, destroyed economically (just few days back our president quoted 68 billion $ loss due to this war), and handing over 100s of Al qaida men, this is what we get back? Just because it was 1 slip? I think it is more of local police matter to determine who lives where and according to recently published news in times, if US was spying on ground for few months, they might have known if somebody was supporting him or we might get to know from the hard drives and stuff seized after-all, why this rancor? why not wait for facts and stop speculate?

Posted by ftiger | Report as abusive
 

> Sometime in 2009, an ISI wiretap picked up a conversation in Arabic between a Sim card in Nowshera and another in Saudi Arabia. [...] Three months later, in 2010, the same Sim woke up to another conversation in Arabic, this time from Peshawar to Saudi Arabia.

The obvious question: Who’s on the Saudi end? That’s another “ally”, right?

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

Posted by prasadgc | Report as abusive
 

Our Balochi brothers have some ideas:

http://my.news.yahoo.com/us-must-lie-det ector-terrorist-general-pasha-locate-090 806626.html

‘US must use ‘lie detector’ on ‘terrorist general’ Pasha to locate Qaeda links’
By ANI | ANI – Sat, May 7, 2011

Washington, May 7(ANI): The United States should arrest Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) chief Lieutenant General Ahmad Shuja Pasha and Pakistan’s Ambassador to Washington, Husain Haqqani, and use polygraph test on both to determine their role in shielding Al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden, the American Friends of Balochistan (AFB) has said.

The Al Qaeda founder, who had evaded capture for a decade, was killed in a top secret operation involving a small team of US Special Forces in Abbottabad city, located 50 kilometres northeast of Islamabad and 150 kilometres east of Peshawar.

Expressing anguish over Pasha’s ongoing visit to Washington to explain Pakistan’s position on the presence of Bin Laden in the country before he was killed in a US operation on May 2, the AFB asked American law enforcement agencies to arrest him for questioning his role in protecting the world’ most wanted terrorist.

Posted by netizen | Report as abusive
 

If ISI has picked up clues about OBL in another country and passed it on to the CIA a few years ago, that would make sense. ISI does not have legal authority in a foreign country. But the intelligence information was about a possible hideout inside their own country. Why would they simply alert the CIA about it and wait for them to take their own action? Shouldn’t Pakistan conducted house to house search in Abbotabad itself? The CIA could zero in on the whereabouts of the criminal and set up a safe house across the street and watch all activities going on. The ISI could train David Coleman Headley on reconnaissance, spotting contacts, establishing links, run survey, train people commando style, and launch them into a foreign country to take out innocent lives. But somehow, it just never knew that Bin Laden was living in a compound that sticks out like a sore thumb in the area, for five odd years, while the CIA could. Kindly spin a better story for public consumption.

The only thing that is clear to everyone other than Pakistanis and their sympathizers is that Pakistan’s military and the ISI have been hiding and protecting all key criminals as much and as long as possible. Whenever they sensed that the CIA got wind of one of the criminals, the ISI washed them off and simply handed him over to the Americans to erase their tracks. If they had sensed that the CIA was zeroing in on OBL, they would have raided his place and handed him over as well. This way they get pats on the back, while taking a chance at the same time. What if the Americans give up the hunt due to domestic pressure? Then Bin Laden could be unleashed without worries.But that gamble did not pay off. The CIA had stopped trusting the ISI and went on its own mission. All the embarrassment arises from this scenario. Bin Laden was a source for American dollars. Something like 20 billion dollars have been poured into Pakistan in this hunt. Why not take that money for as long as it takes? All the sacrifices and soldiers lives is all talk. Musharraf abandoned all his soldiers in Kargil and simply declared no Pak soldier was involved. Many years later the liar admitted the truth. In Pakistan, soldier’s life is not valuable to the military cartel. They sacrificed them in order to protect their duplicity.

I am so glad that Pakistan has been exposed. This impression is very deep and Pakistan will be made to pay for it. It is better if they give up the other criminals sooner rather than latter. Everyone knows for certain that the ISI is hiding all the terrorist leaders. Time, unfortunately, is not going to be on their hands.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

If ISI has picked up clues about OBL in another country and passed it on to the CIA a few years ago, that would make sense. ISI does not have legal authority in a foreign country. But the intelligence information was about a possible hideout inside their own country. Why would they simply alert the CIA about it and wait for them to take their own action? Shouldn’t Pakistan conducted house to house search in Abbotabad itself? The CIA could zero in on the whereabouts of the criminal and set up a safe house across the street and watch all activities going on. The ISI could train David Coleman Headley on reconnaissance, spotting contacts, establishing links, run survey, train people commando style, and launch them into a foreign country to take out innocent lives. But somehow, it just never knew that Bin Laden was living in a compound that sticks out like a sore thumb in the area, for five odd years, while the CIA could. Kindly spin a better story for public consumption.

The only thing that is clear to everyone other than Pakistanis and their sympathizers is that Pakistan’s military and the ISI have been hiding and protecting all key criminals as much and as long as possible. Whenever they sensed that the CIA got wind of one of the criminals, the ISI washed them off and simply handed him over to the Americans to erase their tracks. If they had sensed that the CIA was zeroing in on OBL, they would have raided his place and handed him over as well. This way they get pats on the back, while taking a chance at the same time. What if the Americans give up the hunt due to domestic pressure? Then Bin Laden could be unleashed without worries.But that gamble did not pay off. The CIA had stopped trusting the ISI and went on its own mission. All the embarrassment arises from this scenario. Bin Laden was a source for American dollars. Something like 20 billion dollars have been poured into Pakistan in this hunt. Why not take that money for as long as it takes? All the sacrifices and soldiers lives is all talk. Musharraf abandoned all his soldiers in Kargil and simply declared no Pak soldier was involved. Many years later the liar admitted the truth. In Pakistan, soldier’s life is not valuable to the military cartel. They sacrificed them in order to protect their duplicity.

I am so glad that Pakistan has been exposed. This impression is very deep and Pakistan will be made to pay for it. It is better if they give up the other criminals sooner rather than latter. Everyone knows for certain that the ISI is hiding all the terrorist leaders. Time, unfortunately, is not going to be on their hands.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Well Guys,
This is one of the best book I’ve ever read on India and pakistan. Its not the routine pakistan bashing book but a good collection of well composed articles by respected Authors.
http://www.infibeam.com/Books/info/ira-p ande/great-divide-india-pakistan/9788172 238360.html

One of the Auther points that, is it possible for Pakistan to transform its relationship vis-a-vis India into a more progressive and sucular form of Hatred! Put it simply can it be turned into more of an adversarial relationship of nation building saying “we can do better than you” rather than “we are already better than you”.
Indeed some of the statistics for Pakistan are better than India like child malnourishment or Incidence of Hunger. But then I am a bit pessimistic on that because the hatred shown by Pakistani state is to allow the continued entrechment the deep state combined by Military-feudal-religious class which wanted to precide over a nation as thelogical lords reigning over the people and India is only a tool for scare mongering.

The reason for Pakistani state’s hatred for India may well be this bluff. The lie created out of scare mongering where the real agenda is only to continue their lordship of hapless people.

Many pakistani’s seem to wonder why Indians show so much hatred for Pakistan, so let’s make once and for all clear that the hatred is because of the involvement in Indian affairs (honestly its not limited to kashmir) had the pakistan destroyed theier culture (well they already done), weakened democratic institutions (completed a long ago) and radicalising their youth (happening at rapid pace) we Indians we not have cared much and wont give two hoots for them ,but only for the attacks that are directed against us.
We already have the problems of poverty, corruption and even honour killings are we are not shameful to admit it. But is extremely frustrated with the cross border terrorism which is hampering the national building process.

Posted by sensiblepatriot | Report as abusive
 

KP, The capture of the OBL may well be the blessing in disguise for Pakistan. Lets see this in a slightly different angle.
1. The pakistanis may well have realized that Obama might not be a war time president like the George Cowboy bush. So they started realizing the nature of endgame in Afghanistan and come to terms with the possibility that Americans may not pusue the combat operations well into the future.
2. Given the above scenario, they have started thinking of a case that if the Americans were to leave Afghanistan, it will be back to square-one for them and they may not get the Aid which they are so addicted to now.
3.Their interest lay in handing over the terror groups which may already lost operational capabilities on the terror front. Alqaida fits the bill extremely well, with little operational capabilities in Afghanistan and limited ability to hit pakistan itself, Pakistanis must have realized that this must be the group which is expendable. And we’ve seen leaders being captured to be given to Americans.
4.The same reason why tehrike taliban (pakistan) is pursued so strongly bcoz it hits the Pakistan interests and on the other hand kayani is stubborn not to act against haqqani’s or LET bcoz they still have utility with regards to Afghanistan and India respectively.
5.Finally, The American discourse in the war is about to shift to probably a counter-terrorism war rather than counter-insurgency war.
http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com  /Globespotting/entry/what-could-be-a-ne w-afghan-strategy
which means the Pakistanis continue to create,nurture terrorists and send them to Afghnistan while Americans pay Pakistan still some Aid for target practice and real time training for their young blokes.
And unfortunately whether one accepts or not US may never declare Pakistan a rogue state for fear of complete closure of ties with a nuclear armed country(aka Iran) of 180 million people who it could have some leverage and the fear of that leverage handing it over to chinese.
The only flaw in this seemingly flawless pakistan’s double game is that with fast weakening of the Pakistan’s economy and the slide is real serious this time,a strategic decision needs to be made earlier and need to be made now. Despite american aid, the country is sliding to a point of no return. The same scenario that played in 1999 just when musharaff camne and gave almost 6 years of good growth before the pakistan begun their new belligerence against India and the world.

Posted by sensiblepatriot | Report as abusive
 

The capture of OBL might have been most embarrassing for pakistan, but it will in long term only hasten the end game in Afghanistan. They might have plans to dump him eventually but were not expecting the way it unravelled on early hours on Monday. With the capture of OBL, Pakistan maight have a lot of leverage in Afghan political structure in the future and strangely though, if India finds that structure too Anti-India, it will have to resort to supporting the Norther Alliance to destablise that edifice.

Posted by sensiblepatriot | Report as abusive
 
 
 

I call BS. As somebody who has worked in the allied intelligence community and used real, actionable intelligence, I find it incredibly suspicious that mere transcripts from two phone calls (probably in coded talk), would trigger an entire investigation. At best, the Pakistani contribution was tangential to the hunt.

I know the Pakistanis have to save face and to do that they have to insist that they contributed. The reality says otherwise.

A key clue on the level of the trust is the raid itself. If the Americans had a modicum of trust for Pakistan, they would not have risked exposing a stealth helicopter that has not even been revealed in the US. Risking such assets simply to cover the raid, simply shows that the US had zero intention of sharing anything with Pakistan or that Pakistan even knew what was going on.

President Obama was simply being polite and trying to help Pakistan save face.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

@ Umair

You speak of distrust. That was there long before this raid. You (and even media persons like Myra) have no idea what is said and known about Pakistan behind closed doors. Consider this raid, just a brief glimpse into the real opinion of decision makers (and I don’t just mean the US) around the world vis-a-vis Pakistan.

This is now well beyond Afghanistan. I daresay that governments in the West have accepted that Afghanistan is largely a lost cause. They’ll find a face-saving exit and get out. But nobody should think for a second that they are going to forget about Pakistan’s treachery. You can bet that a very long-term plan is being concocted to deal with Pakistan over the next few decades.

And as long as elements of the Pakistani state believe that it’s acceptable to use terrorists, than the Pakistani state will be fair game. Pakistanis will brag about their nukes and be fixated on them, of course. Silly Pakistanis have never understood that economic and diplomatic isolation is far more dangerous than the Indian bull to their south. Yet, this is exactly what they will have brought upon themselves.

Aid will dry up. Yet nobody will want to do business with Pakistan. What multi-national will want to post employees in Jihad Central? Nobody is ever going to believe Pakistan on anything. Every time a mouse farts in India, they’ll be able to blame Pakistan and the world will accept it. After all, that was the country that hid Bin Laden down the street from their military college, while loudly proclaiming that he wasn’t in the country. Official positions on Kashmir will change over time to support India. After all, how credible is Pakistan when they are harbouring terrorists who kill our citizens and soldiers trying to stabilize the country next door? India must be right about them. On and on it goes. You see, what Pakistanis don’t understand is that those “strategic assets” are proving to be a strategic failure because they are creating a massive strategic vulnerability for Pakistan. They are a giant PR problem, an internally destabilizing force and a force which serves to destabilizes a weaker neighbour next door, and antagonize a larger one on the other side.

There’s a way out. Reverse course. Forget India. Stabilize Pakistan itself. Sincerely pursue all anti-Afghanistan and anti-India groups (LeT, Haqqanis, Taliban, etc.). Will Pakistan do it? I doubt it. And that’s the truly, truly sad part.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

Myra,

I think more focus should be given on the implications of the raid. It’s clear the Americans aren’t going to stop. You can bet that if they find Zawahiri in Pakistan, they’ll be going after him too. Haqqanis? Solid lead and you can bet that they’ll be paid a visit by a bunch of Deltas or SEALs.

Pakistan will of course, now try to beef up it’s surveillance of the Afghan border to try and catch intruding US forces. But it’s not at all clear that they have enough capabilities to detect such an intrusion.

And then there’s India. If it’s okay for the US, why is it not okay for India to go in and do the same, the next time a train goes boom in a major Indian city? Of course, the Indians won’t declare their efforts publicly. But surely, it’ll be very difficult to argue against a similar Indian action, particularly given the recent penchant by Pakistan-based anti-India groups, for targeting Westerners in India.

I’m deeply worried about this. It’s the kind of stuff that leads to escalating conflicts.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

I have proved to myself as I am sure most of us have many times before the last place we find something we looking diligently for is right in front of us,like looking all over the house your glasses that where sitting on top of head all along or the car keys that where in the other pocket instead of the one you usually put them .Very simple simple but true in many circumstances.Not everything in this world has to be a conspiracy ,though it makes for a better mystery.Though I must also say after all it is politics.

Posted by Invictus247 | Report as abusive
 

Another Pakistani lie which has been exposed in the last few days is all their posturing regarding the US aid. Over the last few years, the Pakistanis have tried to act like they don’t care about the aid & it’s not worth the lives of Pakistani soldiers etc. As it now turns out, it is ALL about the aid. Now that the aid is in some jeopardy, they seem to be scrambling & hustling to protect it.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Oh well. May be it is time now for the West/US to abandon the racist, hypocritic policy that pakistani terrorism on Indian civilians should not be taken as seriously as terrorism on westerners.

http://tinyurl.com/3hnbc7h

Three chiefs of Lashkar-i-Taiba, the Pakistani terrorist group, were also indicted in Chicago. They include Sajid Mir, a suspected Mumbai mastermind whose voice was caught on tape directing the three-day slaughter by phone from Pakistan. Mir, too, has ISI links. He remains at large along with the suspected ISI major and half a dozen other top suspects.

Despite the unprecedented terrorism charges implicating a Pakistani officer, the Justice Department and other agencies did not issue news releases, hold a news conference or make any comments when the indictment was issued. The 33-page document names the suspect only as “Major Iqbal.” It does not mention the ISI, although Iqbal’s affiliation to the spy agency has been detailed in U.S. and Indian case files and by anti-terrorism officials in interviews with ProPublica over the past year.

>>>>>>>“Obviously there has been a push to be low-key,” said an Obama administration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the pending trial.

Posted by netizen | Report as abusive
 

The old game has started. Todays news in the TOI mentions Pak troops on high alert along the LOC with Indiar because of what Pakistan sees as threats based on what senior military officials in India said about India having capability to launch similar strikes. Well, whats new? Next week this time the hysteria will have been built up and you will have Zardari and Gillani making stirring speeches of shedding their last drop of blood etc etc. And then take the next flight to France!

Too old a story to have any effect anymore. But it shows a mindset which has developed through pushing the threat from India like it were religion. No one cares to ask why if India was so willing and keen to mount attacks in Pakistan, it hasn’t all these years when Pakistan has been at its most vulnerable? But then asking that question would to Quote Ayaz Amir, speaking in another context, be against everything Pakistan stands for:

“…..and we’ll keep subscribing to theories of Indian hostility and encirclement, because these are the foundations on which stands the peculiar national security state we have constructed, forever threatened and insecure…..

Our ruling establishment is too set in its ways and, sadly, the roots of national stupidity run too deep.

And perish the thought of anyone taking responsibility and throwing in his papers. That’s just not the Pakistani way.”

http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDet ail.aspx?ID=45440&Cat=9&dt=5/6/2011

Posted by DaraIndia | Report as abusive
 

Keith:
“As somebody who has worked in the allied intelligence community and used real, actionable intelligence, I find it incredibly suspicious that mere transcripts from two phone calls (probably in coded talk), would trigger an entire investigation. At best, the Pakistani contribution was tangential to the hunt.”

-Keith, Pakistan has given termendous sacrifice in the war on terror, I have highlighted before the over 3000 officers and men who sacrificed their lives in this war. Try to understand, the history, the containers of weapons shipped to Karachi port by CIA. ISI shipped it to the frontlines and an Soviet-Afghan war where all it began. The roots of a troubled US-Pakistan relationship lies in those fateful years of Afghan war in the 80s, the US later became a superpower and Pakistan became mired in the problems. Unfortunately, despite all that Pakistan is not considered an ally, and decisionmakers in Pakistan are not kids, they know it.

“You (and even media persons like Myra) have no idea what is said and known about Pakistan behind closed doors.”

-Ok, it is that Pakistan is demonized, but as a Pakistani I know who was John Stockwell, I know he was part CIA task force Angola 1975, Operation IA Feature, funding both sides of conflicts, that is just one example of CIA interventions overseas. I know he wrote “In search of enemies”. All intelligence agencies have some dirty secrets, its just that Pakistan is being pursued now. That is what feed the conspiracy theorists, propagandists, and fuel insecurity.

Now that the war in Afghanistan is being lost, there will be an attempt again to abandon Afghanistan, save face and blame everything on Pakistan. We have been betrayed before, Pakistan will be ready for another betrayal and face it courageously. Aid should dry up, i hope it acts as a spur and Pakistan succeeds in creating a sustainable economy and attain dignity.

“There’s a way out. Reverse course. Forget India. Stabilize Pakistan itself. Sincerely pursue all anti-Afghanistan and anti-India groups (LeT, Haqqanis, Taliban, etc.). Will Pakistan do it? I doubt it. And that’s the truly, truly sad part.”

-There is no way out of the mess we have been pushed into by so called “allies”, can’t forget India, they dismembered Pakistan in 1971, at first opportunity they will do it again, can’t let the guard down. PA already moving against HQN, LET, Taliban via step by step approach.

“Pakistan will of course, now try to beef up it’s surveillance of the Afghan border to try and catch intruding US forces. But it’s not at all clear that they have enough capabilities to detect such an intrusion.”

-I can tell you, Pakistan Armed Forces had always thought we have our allies on the western border with Afghanistan, that has changed. But tell you what, next time a SEAL team breaches the border from west, rest assured they will be kissed by a sidewinder from a PAF F-16. And you know the black hawk down raid in Somalia, a botched up attempt to capture warlord Farah Aidid, and Pakistan Army rescued the stranded US special forces team. Your worries are correct, deep down your heart you know the capability of Pakistan military.

“And then there’s India. If it’s okay for the US, why is it not okay for India to go in and do the same, the next time a train goes boom in a major Indian city? Of course, the Indians won’t declare their efforts publicly. But surely, it’ll be very difficult to argue against a similar Indian action, particularly given the recent penchant by Pakistan-based anti-India groups, for targeting Westerners in India.”

-Sir, before we come to that point, I am sure GHQ and Air Headquarter will order to shoot down a drone or intruding forces anywhere to set a precedent. The strategic implications of this raid were discussed in latest ISPR statement after the corps commander conference, and India has already been warned. Any botched up attempt, any more stupid attempt to sieze Pakistan nukes would be dangerous. You never know how a cornered tiger could react. Even then if someone is stupid, sure they can go ahead and be our guest any time and pay us a visit. We will leave no effort in our famed hospitality, pathan style if you know what i mean.

“I’m deeply worried about this. It’s the kind of stuff that leads to escalating conflicts.”

-You should be rightly, afterall not a good idea to mess with a nuclear armed Muslim nation of 200 million people. Believe me, an isolated and humiliated, betrayed Pakistan could react irrationally. And after 1971 Pakistan has nothing to loose, rest assured similar act from India will lead to an all out war.

Lastly, Keith we have had many discussions before, but I would conclude, surely there are crises ahead for Pakistan. Not something new for us, but hopefully we will muddle through them. But never forget the betrayals. You keep harping about Pakistan’s treachery. Maybe we were never destined to be friends. Not after 3000 PA officers and men embracing martyrdom in “war on (t)error”, not at the expense of their blood.

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

Keith,

Pakistan Air Force conducted a country-wide exercise “High Mark 2010″ last year. Entire Air Force and elements of the Army in the country’s biggest military exercise, we are getting back to the old days of Soviet-Afghan war here. It is only a matter of time before things get ugly.

Another thing, when US had the window they did not fix their differences with Iran in 1979. Pakistan too will be lost, and also there is the issue of logistics. If anything, Pakistan can stop the logistic supply line to US/NATO forces. We can’t allow to feed an Army that sneaks into Pakistan overnight like petty thieves and make a mockery of our security forces.

Having stated that, Pakistan though should strictly follow UN security council resolution 1373, control its territory, eliminate non-state actors/terrorist groups and after that shoot down any foreign intruding forces.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HDIiJbqQ IM
Highmark 2010

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

Keith

I am sure Pakistan would also be closely examining the tail section of the operational stealth helicopter and will be extending cooperation with China. Pakistan and china jointly develop fighter jets and tanks already. Finally, I would conclude by not sharing intelligence on OBL and conducting a covert op, US may have committed a “strategic blunder”.

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

Navy SEALs Used Secret Stealth Helicopter in OBL Raid

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfr2PSTGt Nw

US worried pieces of stealth chopper on their way to China already, after developing a stealth fighter jet, how soon will China develop a stealth chopper. and specially when Pakistan and China are known for reverse engineering how soon will PAKISTAN

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

TIT FOR TAT

US demands identities of top ISI operatives
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/07/world/ asia/07policy.html?ref=asia

Pakistan reveals name of CIA station chief Islamabad Mark Carlton
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world  /us/Pakistan-breaches-trust-names-local -CIA-boss/articleshow/8191679.cms

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 

The thumping has started already :)

Posted by DaraIndia | Report as abusive
 

http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/art icle1994245.ece?homepage=true

Sadly the American imperialists are unwilling to learn from their follies.
continuing with more aid to Pakistan, and persisting with same failed policies.

Posted by netizen | Report as abusive
 

“The thumping has started already :)

–Posted by DaraIndia

Exactly same thing happened right after Raymond Davis was caught. Chest thumping is so in the Blood of Pakistanis.

This reminds me of “Achmed, the Dead terrorist”.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uwOL4rB- go

Posted by punjabiyar | Report as abusive
 

“But tell you what, next time a SEAL team breaches the border from west, rest assured they will be kissed by a sidewinder from a PAF F-16.” Posted by Umairpk

Do you ever tire from empty chest thumping? I remember, a few months ago when a US strike had killed some Pakistani soldiers, you & your “brave” army had thumped your breasts hard & declared “the next time the US does an operation like this again we’ll do this, we’ll do that blah blah blah”. What happened? Navy seals flew in from Kandahar, violated your airspace & took out your most “valuable asset” in an operation which took app. 2 hrs, while your wily security forces was caught sleeping at the wheel. Despite all you hollow bravado, exactly how many drones or US planes/choppers has your army downed? ZIP. The world is laughing at you guys but instead of being humble & taking corrective measures, you are again doing, what you do best – breast thumping. You guys are nothing but farts in the wind, you make some noise & stink up the place but that’s pretty much it.

“US worried pieces of stealth chopper on their way to China already, after developing a stealth fighter jet, how soon will China develop a stealth chopper. and specially when Pakistan and China are known for reverse engineering”

Yes we know, you guys are well known cheats. Your nuclear program is a testament to that. Good luck developing the stealth chopper with the help of a few burnt up blades because from what I’ve heard, the body of the chopper was completely burnt.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

Until the war in Afghanistan is completed, Pakistan will be needed. So Pakistan will need to do everything it can to delay the settlement in Afghanistan. They have. They have hidden OBL and all the key criminals for over ten years and stretched this war for as long as they could. A smart President arrived and he began to connect the dots quickly. He knows now that Pakistan is the real villain and not Taliban or Al Qaeda.They can be contained and decimated easily. But Pakistan has used its deceptive methods to come in between, tried to play as a conduit and has taken all the resources for its own benefit. This is how bandit lords operate. They place themselves in the path of caravans and manage bandits to intimidate the caravans, so that traders would have to pay up in order to get through. So the US has decided to take on the bandit lord himself. OBL’s killing is only the beginning. The swift operation took everyone by surprise, including the crooks in Islamabad. They must be really nervous because they will be wondering what the next move will be. The US probably has leads to the other criminals as well. And they are going to knock them out one by one, right in front of the Pakistanis. At the end of this long movie, the bad guys are about to lose.
Chest thumping will not change a thing.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Now the diplomatic dance between Manmohan Singh and Geelani is not going to go anywhere. With complete lack of trust in Pakistan, one cannot be sure of their ulterior motives. Hope we do not cheat ourselves by reaching out to shadows.

Musharraf must be indicted and tried in a US court. I am sure he set up all double dealing infrastructure when WOT started. He must have arranged for hiding all Al Qaeda and Taliban criminals. He is such a liar that they will need to use lie detectors when he answers questions.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Suspects are slowly emerging:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india  /Who-sheltered-Osama-bin-Laden-Kayani-a mong-suspects/articleshow/8200678.cms

Some want heads to roll:

http://www.dawn.com/2011/05/08/time-for- heads-to-roll.html

This splattered egg is going to be difficult to wipe off.

Behind the scenes, the US might already been collecting information on who all have been involved.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

KPSingh,
This news confirms assessments that Kayani is hard core fundamentalist Islamist. It will be fun to see who betrays who within the top echleons of PA/ISI.

I hope the Mumbai trial starting on May 16th will shed more light on how Pasha and Kayani were directly involved in terrorism.

I’ve been posting here we will never find out a power point presentation of Kayani going over the operational details of Mumbai train station and Taj Hotel before lauching the terrorist attack.

Now I feel more optimistic, may be we”ll find something like that :-)

Posted by netizen | Report as abusive
 

Netizen said:

> This news confirms assessments that Kayani is hard core fundamentalist Islamist.

He doesn’t have to be a fundamentalist Islamist. By his own admisssion, he is “India-centric”, in other words, an India-hater. He’s probably a US hater as well. That is sufficient to explain all his actions as ISI chief (support for LeT, Osama, Haqqani, etc.)

Regards,
Ganesh Prasad

Posted by prasadgc | Report as abusive
 

I have a feeling that the US authorities have plenty of evidence regarding Pakistan’s complicity in hiding Bin Laden from the treasure of information retrieved from the compound. They are waiting for the right moment to release it to the world, if & when necessary. They will try to convince/coerce Pakistan to mend it’s ways & if they’re unable to do so, the smoking gun will be revealed to the world.

Posted by Mortal1 | Report as abusive
 

@GP, I agree.

C Raja Mohan has penned a masterpiece on potential coup scenarios in Pakistan. This may be a great opportunity to completely expose PA/ISI.

or will China play spoil sport and decide to prop up Pakistan Army against, the rest of the world?

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/pakist ans-next-coup/787782/4

Posted by netizen | Report as abusive
 
 

Umair:
My personal opinion is that you are on the wrong track. In every matter. I say this solely based on one of your statements:
“And after 1971 Pakistan has nothing to loose, rest assured similar act from India will lead to an all out war.”
This statement is so naive, and proves that you really don’t get “it”. The fact is, you have EVERYTHING to lose. Most importantly, you will lose your future. No matter what response you have to my claim, fact will be that you would have destroyed your country. This should not be acceptable under any circumstances. Your rationale is that of a suicide bomber. It wouldn’t even matter that you took the other guy down with you. Sadly, I think your leaders (army) in your country have the same way of looking at things.
I think you need to understand the concept of Opportunity Cost. There is a cost associated with every decision, a cost related to something else you could have done. In this pursuit of strategic depth/defense (whatever you want call it), what has been the opportunity cost for Pak? You have given away your economic prospects, your country’s integrity & reputation, your country’s safety, and have jeopardized its future.
Perfect example: You boast about giving away American tech (stealth chopper) to the Chinese. What is the opportunity cost here for you? The cost is the relationship with the country that has been your biggest donor for the past decade. The cost is the relationship with a country that is your biggest trade partner and customer (go check world bank figures). I know the general arguments to my claims. You’ll say, we deserve even more for our efforts. But hey, look around you, no one is stepping up to the plate – not even China. Your attitude of raising your chin at the rest of the world (especially the US)is not doing you any favors. Wake up.

Posted by rainydays | Report as abusive
 

A state that was founded on the basis of religion alone in modern times, that has a long history of dictatorship & martial law, whose left hand (present ‘democratically’ elected government) doesn’t know what it’s right hand (the army & the ISI) is doing; besides Pakistan exports terrorism as state policy & much of the nation is bound only by religious fundamentalism & a common hate for India, Israel etc.

Now here comes the worlds greatest democracy, the US, gives the Pakis aid – much of which is diverted to export terrorism to the West & India (incidentally the world’s largest democracy) and the Americans are still surprised to find OBL holed up in Pakistan! What a sick joke!!

Posted by job_charnock | Report as abusive
 

Pakistan’s lobbyists launch Washington D.C. charm offensive

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/05/0 9/politics/main20060975.shtml

Posted by Umairpk | Report as abusive
 
 

“Pakistan-U.S. Rift Widens”

In a few days time the trial of the Mumbai attack planners will start in Chicago. There ISI’s involvment is going to be brought to light.

Pakistan cannot retaliate. It is not in a position to do so. Intelligence people are working round the clock, sifting through the material taken from Bin Laden’s enclave inside Pakistan. Who knows what more will expose Pakistan?

Kayani was heading the ISI when Bin Laden moved into his Abbotabad residence. He was succeeded by Nadeem Taj who was a radicalized lunatic. Mumbai attacks happened during his time, while Kayani now was the chief of the military. Connect the dots.

Pak military and ISI are the real villains. They are the foundations of global Islamic terrorism. The US is only looking for more evidence to confirm this fact. So far, Pak military/ISI have managed to cover the tracks. But it is not something that can be done for too long. They are going to face the barrel of the gun if they act with arrogance.

It is time to clean up the system by firing all these crooks and starting off with a fresh set of open minded and liberal personnel who want to start on a fresh note. This will mean undoing everything that has been invested in the Jihadi infrastructure. They are irrelevant after the Soviet defeat in Afghanistan. It simply won’t work in today’s world.

Posted by KPSingh01 | Report as abusive
 

Umair,

You are so defensive. I understand that your national pride is hurt. But I’m not going to follow you down that rabbit hole. My opinion here is for more than just your benefit.

But I will address some of your arguments:

1) The sacrifice of Pakistanis in the “War on Terror”. Nobody is questioning the sacrifice of Pakistanis. What I suggested was that Pakistanis contributed very little in getting Bin Laden. Your injured pride led you to jump to the wrong conclusion.

2) Pakistan is not demonized behind closed doors. I’m sorry if I gave that impression. But it’s quite clear to the rest of us that there is an element of the Pakistani elite (military and civilian) that’s willing to harbour terrorists at any cost. The Pakistani people are simply collateral in the emerging conflict with this elite. And, westerners, now fully understand the difference between the Pakistani public and the elites of Rawalpindi (though it should be said that not all of the Pakistani military establishment favours conflict with India or the harbouring of terrorists).

3) Forget India. I don’t mean forget about defending against them (1971 and all that). I meant forget about trying to get revenge. It is this thirst for revenge that is driving Pakistani security policy, not a fear of India. Fear of India would lead to a sound defence policy. Thirst for revenge leads to irrational decisions to support terrorists even when they are killing Pakistanis, in the hopes that they might kill a handful of Indians some day. To quote Golda Meir, “We will have peace when they love their children more than they hate us.”

4) Shooting down US intruders. I find it laughable that you think the PAF will even see a US helicopter on their radars (you obviously don’t know the limits of radar technology, especially in the moutains of the Hindu Kush), and that you believe that a Sidewinder will be able to take down a helicopter stuffed to the gills with defensive aids to defeat incoming missiles (whose seeker profile the US military is fully cognizant of). Your chest-thumping aside. I’m not even American and I know. The US will risk their entire armed forces for one US citizen. That’s why it means something to be an American. What do you think they’ll do if that citizen was wearing a uniform? I have no doubt your generals understand that too. They won’t be shooting down any US helicopters any time soon. They might try to intercept them though and prevent them from carrying out any raids though. Drones they might shoot down. Don’t let your pride overcome your logic. My comment was aimed at the wider audience. What is the implication of knowing that Pakistan might (or will) attempt to limit or stop some raids?

5) If the Pakistani GHQ is an unimaginative as you, the Indians are going to have a field day demolishing terror groups in Pakistan. Then again, the first reaction to a raid from Afghanistan is to place forces along the Indian border on high alert. So maybe the GHQ is really ignorant. If you were an Indian planner why would you send the choppers in from Rajasthan or Punjab, knowing the Pakistanis are watching for intrusions from here? I’d send them out over the Arabian sea and after a refuelling, low-level through Iran, Afghanistan and over Pakistan’s Western border. Or I’d simply send in RAW undercover. If the ISI can’t find the world’s most wanted man, 700m from a military college, what’s the chance they’ll be able to catch a bunch of RAW agents that can easily blend in to the local population? My question however was aimed at the wider audience. More specifically, how can the West condemn India, after this raid? We, in the West, might chide India for raising tensions and all that. But here on in, nobody is really going to seriously pressure India for taking on terrorists hiding out in Pakistan. Especially if those terrorists also kill Western citizens. There will just be token statements about stability in South Asia and avoiding the escalation of tensions. Etc. Though, if the Indians are really smart, they’ll take out their enemies and never claim credit for it, denying Pakistan the ability to make claims against India. Kinda like Mossad’s policies of ambiguity.

6) The stealth chopper on its way to China. I’m curious to see what the Chinese will do with only the tail. I’m an aerospace engineer by training. There’s nothing I see there that would give away any big secrets to the Chinese. Oooh, angled surfaces reduce radar cross-section. The good stuff was all reduced to ash by the thermite grenades. And you’re assuming the US hasn’t already insisted on its property being returned in exchange for not cutting a billion or two off the air schedule.

7) Your nukes. Blah blah blah. Nobody cares anymore. You silly Pakistanis never learned from the Soviets despite helping to defeat them. They had a massive nuclear arsenal too. Guess where it got them. To paraphrase Bill Clinton, “It’s the economy stupid!” Pakistanis will do anything to protect the nukes while the country withers away economically. All the Indians have to do is increase defence spending by 1-2% of GDP and Pakistan will starve itself into oblivion trying to keep up. The greatest enemy of Pakistan are Pakistanis themselves. Sadly, this prediction is coming true. Ronald Reagan’s wisdom is at work in South Asia. Not because the Indians want to harm Pakistan, but because they must raise defence spending to keep up with Pakistan’s ally: China. So in the end, Chinese antagonism towards India is screwing over Pakistan, all while the Pakistanis believe that China it their all-weather friend bringing them sunshine, rainbows and unicorns. Isn’t the circle of life wonderful? And while you complain about the US, guess whose money is helping you keep parity while not starving.

8) Giving up the name of the CIA station chief. Big deal. He’ll be on his way home to Washington, and another guy will be in place soon enough. Such is life. These kinds of moves, are diplomatic games, for public consumption. Do you really believe that passing out the name of the CIA station chief is going to have a big impact? All that will accomplish is further demonstrate how unreliable Pakistanis are. If they can’t keep the name of the station chief secret, why would you trust them with the address of Al Qaeda’s leader? “We were going to get them in on Zawahiri next month, but….”

All this, is why I have said, that Pakistan needs to get out of its anti-India mentality and focus internally. This anti-india policy is leading to irrational decision-making that isn’t even in the long-term best interest of Pakistan and Pakistanis. Seriously. Tell me what Pakistan would do if there was no aid coming in? How would Pakistan cope economically? And what’s the plan to keep up with India if they keep raising defence spending at 10%or more every year? These are questions that need urgent answers. The war in Afghanistan is coming to an end. Pakistan won’t be needed any more. The aid might stick around for a year or two after. But it will dry up eventually. But you’ll still have your bloated armed forces to pay for.

Posted by kEiThZ | Report as abusive
 

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