Paul's Feed
May 18, 2012

U.S. firms eye Myanmar as sanctions suspended

By Andrew Quinn and Paul Eckert

(Reuters) – The suspension of U.S. sanctions barring investment in Myanmar in response to political reforms in the poor southeast Asian state gives a green light to U.S. firms queuing to scout for business in one of the last frontier markets.

“Today we say to American business: invest in Burma and do it responsibly,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said at a news briefing on Thursday with Myanmar’s Foreign Minister Wunna Maung Lwin, on his long-isolated nation’s first official visit to Washington in decades as ties between the two countries warm.

May 17, 2012

U.S. suspends sanctions on investment in Myanmar

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States on Thursday suspended sanctions barring U.S. investment in Myanmar in response to political reforms in the poor southeast Asian state, drawing praise from some U.S. lawmakers but criticism from human rights advocates.

“Today we say to American business: invest in Burma and do it responsibly,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said.

May 9, 2012

U.S. study finds N. Korea info controls weakening

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – More and more North Koreans are defying strict government controls on access to outside information that starkly contrasts with official propaganda, said a U.S. study released Wednesday.

Avid consumption of South Korean movies and pop music as well as foreign radio and television broadcasts is changing North Korean views of its southern neighbor and even of the United States, a report by the InterMedia consultancy showed.

May 9, 2012

U.S. study finds N. Korea info controls weakening

WASHINGTON, May 9 (Reuters) – More and more North Koreans
are defying strict government controls on access to outside
information that starkly contrasts with official propaganda,
said a U.S. study released Wednesday.

Avid consumption of South Korean movies and pop music as
well as foreign radio and television broadcasts is changing
North Korean views of its southern neighbor and even of the
United States, a report by the InterMedia consultancy showed.

May 4, 2012

China says blind dissident Chen can ask to study abroad

BEIJING/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – China on Friday said blind dissident Chen Guangcheng could apply to study abroad, suggesting an end may be near to a diplomatic crisis that has soured relations between Beijing and Washington.

The announcement by the Chinese Foreign Ministry follows a dramatic and very public appeal by Chen, who spoke by phone to a U.S. congressional hearing on his case, asking to be allowed to spend some time in the United States.

May 4, 2012

China’s Chen appeals to US congress, Clinton treads carefully

BEIJING/WASHINGTON, May 4 (Reuters) – Blind Chinese
dissident Chen Guangcheng made a dramatic plea for U.S.
protection in a cellphone call to a congressional hearing from
his hospital bed in Beijing, raising pressure on President
Barack Obama over his administration’s handling of the case.

Chen, a self-taught legal activist, sheltered in the U.S.
embassy for six days until Wednesday when he left after
U.S.-brokered assurances from the Chinese government that he and
his family would receive better treatment inside China.

May 4, 2012

Obama under pressure as China dissident appeals for help

BEIJING/WASHINGTON, May 3 (Reuters) – Blind Chinese
dissident Chen Guangcheng made a dramatic plea for help in a
cellphone call to a U.S. congressional hearing from his hospital
bed in Beijing, raising the pressure on President Barack Obama
over his administration’s handling of the case.

Chen, a self-taught legal activist, sheltered in the U.S.
Embassy for six days until Wednesday. He left the embassy on the
same day that U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived in
Beijing for talks aimed at improving economic and strategic
relations between the two superpowers.

May 3, 2012

Chen makes dramatic phone appeal to U.S. lawmakers

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng made a dramatic telephone appeal to come to the United States in a call broadcast live on Thursday to a U.S. congressional hearing.

“I want to come to the U.S. to rest. I have not had a rest in 10 years,” Chen said, his comments in Chinese made on a mobile telephone that was held up to a microphone at the hearing. “I’m concerned most right now with the safety of my mother and brothers. I really want to know what’s going on with them.”

May 3, 2012

Obama under pressure over China dissident seeking asylum

BEIJING/WASHINGTON, May 3 (Reuters) – President Barack Obama
came under pressure on Thursday to ensure the safety of blind
Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng who briefly took refuge in the
American embassy and whose later desperate pleas for asylum from
a Beijing hospital bed threaten to fan U.S.-China tensions.

Chen, a self-taught legal activist, left the U.S. Embassy on
Wednesday shortly before U.S. Secretary of State Hillary of
Clinton arrived in Beijing for talks aimed at improving economic
and strategic relations between the two superpowers.

May 3, 2012

Stand-off over Chinese dissident poses quandary for Obama

BEIJING/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng appealed on Thursday for asylum in the United States, throwing into doubt an agreement used to coax him out of hiding in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and fanning U.S.-China tensions at a sensitive time.

The standoff appeared particularly troublesome for the Obama administration, with Chen saying he now fears for his and his family’s safety if he stays in China as planned under a deal Washington had called a good outcome for the dissident.