Opinion

Paul Taylor

Drop terror listing of Iran foes: ex-Obama aide

Paul Taylor
Apr 27, 2011 19:06 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – The United States should remove the main exiled Iranian opposition group from its blacklist of outlawed terrorist organizations, President Barack Obama’s former national security adviser said Wednesday.

Gen. James Jones, who as the top national security official in the White House until last November pursued a diplomatic opening with Iran, said he knew of no evidence that the People’s Mujahideen were involved in terrorism.

The issue had gained new urgency since Iraqi troops attacked a camp which is home to some 3,400 Mujahideen members and their relatives northeast of Baghdad on April 8, killing 35 people and wounding more than 200, he said.

Asked whether Washington should take the Mujahideen off the blacklist, the former NATO supreme commander said: “I haven’t seen any reason not to. I haven’t heard any reason not to.”

He said it was “odd” that the United States and the Iranian government would agree on any group being a terrorist organization, given their many differences.

Analysis: West’s caution on Syria jars with Libya action

Paul Taylor
Apr 25, 2011 14:21 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – An authoritarian Arab ruler unleashes his security forces and irregular militia gunmen to crush peaceful pro-democracy protests, killing hundreds of people including women and children.

Does the West a) issue statements condemning the excessive use of force; b) seek U.N. sanctions and an International Criminal Court investigation; c) provide practical support for pro-democracy protesters, d) intervene militarily?

The answer, to many human rights campaigners, seems to vary unacceptably depending on the state concerned.

West’s caution on Syria jars with Libya action

Paul Taylor
Apr 25, 2011 14:18 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – An authoritarian Arab ruler unleashes his security forces and irregular militia gunmen to crush peaceful pro-democracy protests, killing hundreds of people including women and children.

Does the West a) issue statements condemning the excessive use of force; b) seek U.N. sanctions and an International Criminal Court investigation; c) provide practical support for pro-democracy protesters, d) intervene militarily?

The answer, to many human rights campaigners, seems to vary unacceptably depending on the state concerned.

Crisis-driven populism threatens euro zone rescues

Paul Taylor
Apr 18, 2011 13:17 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – Rising political populism around Europe, driven by public anger over the impact of the financial crisis, threatens to make solving the euro zone’s debt woes increasingly difficult.

It also heralds a new clampdown on immigrants and asylum seekers as Europe’s ageing societies seek to protect their jobs, welfare benefits and living standards amid public spending cuts.

The stunning surge of the True Finns party from obscurity to become the third force neck-and-neck with the mainstream parties in Sunday’s election means Finland is bound to become a much more awkward member of the single currency area.

Analysis: Crisis-driven populism threatens euro zone rescues

Paul Taylor
Apr 18, 2011 12:48 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – Rising political populism around Europe, driven by public anger over the impact of the financial crisis, threatens to make solving the euro zone’s debt woes increasingly difficult.

It also heralds a new clampdown on immigrants and asylum seekers as Europe’s aging societies seek to protect their jobs, welfare benefits and living standards amid public spending cuts.

The stunning surge of the True Finns party from obscurity to become the third force neck-and-neck with the mainstream parties in Sunday’s election means Finland is bound to become a much more awkward member of the single currency area.

France flirts with “Euro-protectionism”

Paul Taylor
Apr 18, 2011 08:47 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – An old French idea is blossoming again in the Paris springtime.

France’s Socialists have just embraced a form of European trade protectionism in their manifesto, a shift from their previous endorsement of globalisation as a win-win proposition for French workers.

The shift matters both because the Socialists and their Green allies have a good chance of unseating centre-right President Nicolas Sarkozy in next year’s election, and because France has a way of setting the political agenda in Europe.

Analysis: France flirts with “Euro-protectionism”

Paul Taylor
Apr 18, 2011 05:59 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – An old French idea is blossoming again in the Paris springtime.

France’s Socialists have just embraced a form of European trade protectionism in their manifesto, a shift from their previous endorsement of globalization as a win-win proposition for French workers.

The shift matters both because the Socialists and their Green allies have a good chance of unseating center-right President Nicolas Sarkozy in next year’s election, and because France has a way of setting the political agenda in Europe.

Analysis: French bristle at NATO limits in Libya

Paul Taylor
Apr 12, 2011 16:19 UTC

BRUSSELS/PARIS (Reuters) – French criticism of the pace of NATO’s air campaign in Libya may be laying a trail to blame the U.S.-led alliance for a looming military stalemate that could leave Muammar Gaddafi clinging to power.

It also reflects frustration at the United States’ withdrawal from ground strikes on Gaddafi’s forces and at restrictions placed by several European allies on the use of their warplanes in Libya, diplomats and analysts said.

Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said on Tuesday that NATO should be doing more to destroy Gaddafi’s heavy weapons. “It’s not enough,” he told France Info radio.

French criticism highlights NATO limits in Libya

Paul Taylor
Apr 12, 2011 16:11 UTC

BRUSSELS/PARIS (Reuters) – French criticism of the pace of NATO’s air campaign in Libya may be laying a trail to blame the U.S.-led alliance for a looming military stalemate that could leave Muammar Gaddafi clinging to power.

It also reflects frustration at the United States’ withdrawal from ground strikes on Gaddafi’s forces and at restrictions placed by several European allies on the use of their warplanes in Libya, diplomats and analysts said.

Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said on Tuesday that NATO should be doing more to destroy Gaddafi’s heavy weapons. “It’s not enough,” he told France Info radio.

Analysis: French criticism highlights NATO limits in Libya

Paul Taylor
Apr 12, 2011 14:15 UTC

BRUSSELS/PARIS (Reuters) – French criticism of the pace of NATO’s air campaign in Libya may be laying a trail to blame the U.S.-led alliance for a looming military stalemate that could leave Muammar Gaddafi clinging to power.

It also reflects frustration at the United States’ withdrawal from ground strikes on Gaddafi’s forces and at restrictions placed by several European allies on the use of their warplanes in Libya, diplomats and analysts said.

Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said Tuesday that NATO should be doing more to destroy Gaddafi’s heavy weapons. “It’s not enough,” he told France Info radio.

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