Opinion

Paul Taylor

Europe misses Strauss-Kahn in its hour of need

Paul Taylor
May 30, 2011 13:24 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – Europe may miss Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s leadership in its hour of need even more than will the International Monetary Fund and the French left.

The charismatic former French finance minister acted as a cool-headed crisis manager with influence in Athens, Berlin, Frankfurt and Brussels after the euro zone sovereign debt turmoil erupted in 2009.

He has also been a consistent and articulate advocate of closer European integration, centred on the euro currency area.

Strauss-Kahn went out on a limb to support the euro area as no previous IMF managing director had done, using his position to coax and occasionally scold reluctant European governments toward greater fiscal union.

His shock departure following charges of sexually assaulting a hotel maid in New York, which he denies, could hardly have come at a worse time for the European Union as it struggles with a deepening debt crisis and a spreading wave of angry nationalism.

Analysis: Europe misses Strauss-Kahn in its hour of need

Paul Taylor
May 30, 2011 05:55 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – Europe may miss Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s leadership in its hour of need even more than will the International Monetary Fund and the French left.

The charismatic former French finance minister acted as a cool-headed crisis manager with influence in Athens, Berlin, Frankfurt and Brussels after the euro zone sovereign debt turmoil erupted in 2009.

He has also been a consistent and articulate advocate of closer European integration, centered on the euro currency area.

EU policy options narrow to avert Greek default

Paul Taylor
May 24, 2011 10:34 UTC

ATHENS/PARIS, May 24 (Reuters) – Europe’s policy options to
manage Greece’s debt crisis are narrowing fast with the European
Central Bank and credit ratings agencies warning against even a
voluntary debt restructuring and Athens highlighting the risk of
an imminent default unless it gets more EU money.

Moody’s became the latest ratings agency on Tuesday to warn
of a chain reaction of severe consequences for the 17-nation
euro area if Greece were allowed to default next month, when it
faces a 13.4 billion euro funding crunch.

Greece launched a stalled privatisation programme and
promised tougher austerity measures and tax hikes on Monday to
meet EU and IMF conditions for the release of a 12 billion euro
loan tranche in June, crucial to keep Athens afloat.

France between denial, anger and grief over Strauss-Kahn

Paul Taylor
May 20, 2011 10:41 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – France is caught between denial, rage and grief at the fall of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, with many gutted Socialist supporters clutching at conspiracy theories over the IMF chief’s arrest for alleged attempted rape.

An opinion poll taken the day after the French learned that the frontrunner in next year’s presidential election was in a New York police cell, charged with sexually assaulting a hotel maid, showed 57 percent thought he was the victim of a plot.

Among Socialists, that number rose to 70 percent.

“The French people did not want it to be true, even more so in the case of Socialist sympathisers,” Gerald Bronner, a Strasbourg University sociologist specialised in popular beliefs, told the newspaper Le Monde.

France between denial, anger and grief over DSK

Paul Taylor
May 20, 2011 10:32 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – France is caught between denial, rage and grief at the fall of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, with many gutted Socialist supporters clutching at conspiracy theories over the IMF chief’s arrest for alleged attempted rape.

An opinion poll taken the day after the French learned that the frontrunner in next year’s presidential election was in a New York police cell, charged with sexually assaulting a hotel maid, showed 57 percent thought he was the victim of a plot.

Among Socialists, that number rose to 70 percent.

“The French people did not want it to be true, even more so in the case of Socialist sympathisers,” Gerald Bronner, a Strasbourg University sociologist specialised in popular beliefs, told the newspaper Le Monde.

Analysis: France caught between denial, anger and grief over DSK

Paul Taylor
May 20, 2011 10:18 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – France is caught between denial, rage and grief at the fall of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, with many gutted Socialist supporters clutching at conspiracy theories over the IMF chief’s arrest for alleged attempted rape.

An opinion poll taken the day after the French learned that the frontrunner in next year’s presidential election was in a New York police cell, charged with sexually assaulting a hotel maid, showed 57 percent thought he was the victim of a plot.

Among Socialists, that number rose to 70 percent.

“The French people did not want it to be true, even more so in the case of Socialist sympathizers,” Gerald Bronner, a Strasbourg University sociologist specialized in popular beliefs, told the newspaper Le Monde.

Analysis: France between denial, anger and grief over DSK

Paul Taylor
May 20, 2011 10:04 UTC

PARIS (Reuters) – France is caught between denial, rage and grief at the fall of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, with many gutted Socialist supporters clutching at conspiracy theories over the IMF chief’s arrest for alleged attempted rape.

An opinion poll taken the day after the French learned that the frontrunner in next year’s presidential election was in a New York police cell, charged with sexually assaulting a hotel maid, showed 57 percent thought he was the victim of a plot.

Among Socialists, that number rose to 70 percent.

“The French people did not want it to be true, even more so in the case of Socialist sympathizers,” Gerald Bronner, a Strasbourg University sociologist specialized in popular beliefs, told the newspaper Le Monde.

IMF chief resigns, debate on successor heats up

Paul Taylor
May 19, 2011 17:07 UTC

WASHINGTON/PARIS (Reuters) – French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde emerged as frontrunner on Thursday to succeed Dominique Strauss-Kahn as head of the IMF after he resigned and vowed to fight charges of sexually assaulting a hotel maid.

His letter of resignation, tendered from a New York prison cell, triggered a political tug-of-war over the leadership of the global lender. Strauss-Kahn arrived at a New York court building on Thursday to apply for release on $1 million bail.

His arrest on Saturday dashed his prospects of running for the French presidency in 2012 and sparked debate over the 65-year-old tradition that a European heads the IMF.

Strauss-Kahn resigns as Lagarde heads race to take over

Paul Taylor
May 19, 2011 15:25 UTC

WASHINGTON/PARIS (Reuters) – French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde emerged as frontrunner Thursday to succeed Dominique Strauss-Kahn as head of the IMF after he resigned, vowing to fight charges of sexually assaulting a hotel maid.

His letter of resignation, tendered from a New York prison cell triggered a political tug-of-war over the leadership of the global lender. Strauss-Kahn arrived at a New York court building Thursday to apply for release on $1 million bail.

His arrest Saturday dashed his prospects of running for the French presidency in 2012 and sparked debate over the 65-year-old tradition that a European heads the IMF.

IMF chief resigns, Lagarde heads race to take over

Paul Taylor
May 19, 2011 15:15 UTC

WASHINGTON/PARIS, May 19 (Reuters) – French Finance Minister
Christine Lagarde emerged as frontrunner on Thursday to succeed
Dominique Strauss-Kahn as head of the IMF after he resigned,
vowing to fight charges of sexually assaulting a hotel maid.

His letter of resignation, tendered from a New York prison
cell triggered a political tug-of-war over the leadership of the
global lender. Strauss-Kahn arrived at a New York court building
on Thursday to apply for release on $1 million bail.

His arrest on Saturday dashed his prospects of running for
the French presidency in 2012 and sparked debate over the
65-year-old tradition that a European heads the IMF.

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