Paul's Feed
Feb 4, 2011
via MediaFile

Five marketers who better bring it big on Super Bowl Sunday

Call it the Ad Bowl. Or the Buzz Bowl. Or the BS Bowl. Doesn’t matter, it all boils down to this: Sunday’s Super Bowl is the biggest day of the year for advertisers, some of which dished out $3 million for the chance to reach an audience of 100 million consumers for 30 seconds. At that price — $100,000 a second — the stakes are high. A good commercial can be a triumph, creating just the kind of water-cooler talk that propels a brand to a new level with consumers. A bad commercial? Well, those behind it better start dusting off the old resume.

Still, like anything else, the risks are greater for some more than others. So here is our list of… Five Marketers Who Better Bring It Big On Sunday.

Feb 2, 2011

AOL revenue down 26 percent with ad struggles

NEW YORK (Reuters) – AOL Inc suffered sharp declines in quarterly advertising sales and dial-up subscriptions, driving overall revenue down 26 percent and showing the struggling Internet company has yet to turn the corner.

Chief Executive Tim Armstrong has been trying to transform the company, known for its dial-up Internet access business, into a media and entertainment powerhouse. He repeated on Wednesday that he expected AOL to show growth in its display and branding advertising sales later this year.

Jan 27, 2011

Netflix profit jumps as it adds customers; shares up

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Netflix Inc. reported blockbuster profit and signed up another 3 million subscribers in the fourth quarter, making clear why the movie rental company worries competitors and delights investors.

Shares of Netflix rose more than 10 percent after its better-than-expected results, marking yet another big jump for a company whose stock has nearly quadrupled in the past year as it shakes up Hollywood’s business model.

Jan 26, 2011

Netflix profit up, adds subscribers

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Netflix Inc., the movie rental service, reported better-than-expected quarterly profit, fueled by rapid subscriber growth that shows no sign of letting up this year.

Shares of Netflix rose 7 percent after its quarterly results, marking yet another big jump for a company whose stock has nearly quadrupled in the past year as it shakes up Hollywood’s traditional business models.

Jan 26, 2011

Netflix profit up, adds subscribers; shares jump

NEW YORK, Jan 26 (Reuters) – Netflix Inc.(NFLX.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), the
movie rental service, reported better-than-expected quarterly
profit, fueled by rapid subscriber growth that shows no sign of
letting up this year.

Shares of Netflix rose 7 percent after its quarterly
results, marking yet another big jump for a company whose stock
has nearly quadrupled in the past year as it shakes up
Hollywood’s traditional business models.

Jan 26, 2011

Tellabs shocks Street with loss, weak sales outlook

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Tellabs Inc (TLAB.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) shocked investors with an unexpected loss and weaker-than-expected sales outlook, raising fears the network equipment maker is losing market share to rivals like Cisco Systems Inc (CSCO.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) and sending its shares down 19 percent.

Juniper Networks Inc (JNPR.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), another Cisco competitor, beat Wall Street’s sales expectations later on Tuesday, but Tellabs, which specializes in broadband and optical network gear, was clearly the big surprise of the day.

Jan 25, 2011

Tellabs sales disappoint, shares fall 20 percent

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Tellabs Inc (TLAB.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) warned that first-quarter sales would miss expectations after it posted disappointing fourth-quarter results, suggesting the network equipment maker is losing market share to rivals like Cisco Systems Inc (CSCO.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz).

The company’s shares fell 20 percent on Tuesday.

In the past year, the company benefited from a push by AT&T Inc (T.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) and other phone companies to build advanced wireless networks to support smartphones and other new devices.

Jan 24, 2011
via MediaFile

NBC Universal creates new sports marketing agency

It’s no secret that sports has been the brightest star of broadcast television lately. It pulls big audiences, and those viewers watch live — a combination that advertisers drool over.  So NBC Universal figured it was high time to make the most of its sports assets — soon to be coupled with those of Comcast – and today announced the creation of “NBC Sports Agency.”

The purpose of the group is to market NBC Sports, whether it’s their coverage of hockey, football, horse racing or the Olympics, and produce campaigns for advertisers or league partners like the NFL or the NHL. John Miller, credited for coming up with the “Must See TV” campaign for NBC’s primetime, will head up the effort. Many industry watchers had predicted that Comcast’s take over of NBC would see a push for more competition for sports rights with Disney’s ESPN powerhouse. Let the battle commence.

Jan 22, 2011

Google’s Page brings change and questions

SAN FRANCISCO/NEW YORK, Jan 21 (Reuters) – One day after
Google’s surprise announcement that Larry Page would once again
run the company, investors and industry insiders were wondering
if he is up to a now very different job.

The 38-year-old co-founder of the world’s No. 1 Internet
search company will replace Eric Schmidt as chief executive
officer in April, at a time when Google Inc (GOOG.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) is facing
tough competition from Facebook and Twitter.

Jan 21, 2011

Google investors worry about future growth

NEW YORK/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Google Inc shares shed earlier gains as confidence that CEO Larry Page would rejuvenate the No. 1 Internet search company wavered.

Shares of Google, which gained 2 percent following Thursday’s better-than-expected quarterly results and the news that Page would replace Eric Schmidt as chief executive, were down $1.08 at $625.69 in midday trading on Friday.