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Oct 13, 2013

Cyber warrior shortage hits anti-hacker fightback

LONDON, Oct 13 (Reuters) – For the governments and
corporations facing increasing computer attacks, the biggest
challenge is finding the right cyber warriors to fight back.

Hostile computer activity from spies, saboteurs, competitors
and criminals has spawned a growing industry of corporate
defenders who can attract the best talent from government cyber
units.

Sep 30, 2013

Analysis: From Syria to South China Sea, navies cruise back into vogue

LONDON (Reuters) – After a quarter century of Middle Eastern land wars and a sharp fall in big powers’ naval spending after the Cold War, sea power is back in vogue in response to the rise of China and Western reluctance to deploy ground troops in conflicts like Syria.

The greater interest in navies is being felt from the corridors of Washington to the pirate hunting grounds off Africa and the shipyards of Asia.

Sep 30, 2013

From Syria to South China Sea, navies cruise back into vogue

LONDON, Sept 30 (Reuters) – After a quarter century of
Middle Eastern land wars and a sharp fall in big powers’ naval
spending after the Cold War, sea power is back in vogue in
response to the rise of China and Western reluctance to deploy
ground troops in conflicts like Syria.

The greater interest in navies is being felt from the
corridors of Washington to the pirate hunting grounds off Africa
and the shipyards of Asia.

Sep 13, 2013

Tiny recon robots herald new generation of drones

LONDON, Sept 13 (Reuters) – Ex-U.S. Marine Ernest Langdon
pulls a pin and throws a small black object onto the ground. But
it doesn’t explode. Instead, the robot rights itself and swiftly
scuttles away, feeding infrared video back to a small radio
control screen.

Unmanned drones have become an almost ubiquitous presence on
the battlefield for U.S. and other high-tech forces.

Aug 27, 2013

U.S. strike would aim to punish Assad, not turn tide of war

LONDON (Reuters) – Any strike by the United States and its allies on Syria will probably aim to teach President Bashar al-Assad – and Iran – a lesson on the risks of defying the West, but not try to turn the tide of the civil war.

U.S. and European officials say a short, sharp attack – perhaps entirely with cruise missiles – is the preferred response to what they believe is Assad’s responsibility for a chemical weapons attack on rebel-held areas last week.

Aug 27, 2013

Analysis: U.S. strike would aim to punish Assad, not turn tide of war

LONDON (Reuters) – Any strike by the United States and its allies on Syria will probably aim to teach President Bashar al-Assad – and Iran – a lesson on the risks of defying the West, but not try to turn the tide of the civil war.

U.S. and European officials say a short, sharp attack – perhaps entirely with cruise missiles – is the preferred response to what they believe is Assad’s responsibility for a chemical weapons attack on rebel-held areas last week.

Aug 23, 2013

Nerve agent rockets seen behind Syria strike: experts

LONDON (Reuters) – While much remains sketchy about the apparent gassing of Syrians on the outskirts of Damascus, Western experts believe rockets or missiles were used to disperse a nerve agent in the worst chemical attack in a quarter of a century.

They suspect an organophosphate agent, most likely sarin gas, was involved in Wednesday’s attack. However, the basic chemical agent may have been mixed with other substances acting as preservatives and perhaps also to alter or add to the effects of the gas.

Aug 23, 2013

Syria government, rebels ramp up conventional weapons use

LONDON (Reuters) – Syria’s warring sides might have struggled to get the foreign arms they want, but even before this week’s apparent chemical attack both government and opposition were using ever more powerful conventional weapons.

On Wednesday, opposition forces accused the government of President Bashar al-Assad of killing hundreds with a nerve gas attack in the suburbs of the capital Damascus.

Aug 22, 2013

Clock ticks while experts kept away from Syria gassing site

AMSTERDAM/LONDON (Reuters) – The longer chemical weapons inspectors wait in a Damascus luxury hotel for permission to drive up the road to the site of what appears to be the worst poison gas attack in a quarter century, the less likely they will be able to get to the bottom of it.

The poisoning deaths of many hundreds of people took place only three days after a team of U.N. chemical weapons experts arrived in Syria. But their limited mandate means the inspectors have so far been powerless to go to the scene, a short drive from where they are staying.

Aug 22, 2013

Analysis: Clock ticks while experts kept away from Syria gassing site

AMSTERDAM/LONDON (Reuters) – The longer chemical weapons inspectors wait in a Damascus luxury hotel for permission to drive up the road to the site of what appears to be the worst poison gas attack in a quarter century, the less likely they will be able to get to the bottom of it.

The poisoning deaths of many hundreds of people took place only three days after a team of U.N. chemical weapons experts arrived in Syria. But their limited mandate means the inspectors have so far been powerless to go to the scene, a short drive from where they are staying.

    • About Peter

      "Peter Apps is political risk correspondent for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, covering a range of stories on the interplay between politics, economics and markets. Previously, he was emerging markets correspondent based in London after postings in southern Africa and Sri Lanka. His neck was broken in a vehicle smash on assignment in Sri Lanka in 2006, leaving him largely paralysed from the shoulders down."
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