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Feb 17, 2011
via Environment Forum

California hopes carbon market sparks innovation

California’s lonely attempt to take on climate change by setting up a cap-and-trade market for carbon is all about jobs for many in the Golden State — as shown in a Reuters¬†Special Report issued today.

Carbon prices may jump high enough to send companies scrambling for new technology, whether it’s carbon-free energy, efficiency widgets, or something yet to be cleaned up. Longtime clean tech advocate Dan Reicher, who has left Google’s clean energy efforts to run a new Stanford center for energy policy and finance, sees a high price of carbon as great for investors and venture capitalists who back them.

Feb 17, 2011

Special Report: The California carbon rush

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Under California’s new carbon trading system, big polluters will be paying through the nose for the privilege.

And so will everyone else in the state.

The basic premise is “no pain, no gain” — when the price starts to pinch, that will spur innovation and California will lead the world in green technology. Or at least that’s the plan.

Feb 17, 2011

The California Carbon Rush (Hold the Eureka!)

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Under California’s new carbon trading system, big polluters will be paying through the nose for the privilege.

And so will everyone else in the state.

The basic premise is “no pain, no gain” — when the price starts to pinch, that will spur innovation and California will lead the world in green technology. Or at least that’s the plan.

Feb 17, 2011

Special Report – The California Carbon Rush (Hold the Eureka!)

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Under California’s new carbon trading system, big polluters will be paying through the nose for the privilege.

And so will everyone else in the state.

The basic premise is “no pain, no gain” — when the price starts to pinch, that will spur innovation and California will lead the world in green technology. Or at least that’s the plan.

Feb 15, 2011

Secret recording may be heard at Barry Bonds trial

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A U.S. judge on Tuesday ruled that a secret locker room audio recording about injections, urine tests and Barry Bonds could be used at the baseball home run king’s perjury trial next month.

The slugger, accused of lying to a grand jury and hampering investigation of a steroid distribution ring in professional athletics, goes on trial on March 21.

Feb 11, 2011

Judge mulls allowing evidence in Barry Bonds case

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A U.S. judge on Friday considered whether to throw out government evidence in the perjury case of Barry Bonds, a day after prosecutors dropped more than half the charges against the home run king.

The government in a new indictment charged Bonds with four counts of lying to a grand jury about his use of performance-enhancing drugs and one count of obstruction of justice. It dropped six other perjury charges based on the same testimony.

Feb 4, 2011

Analysis: Texas vs California: A tale of two budget deficits

AUSTIN, Texas/SACRAMENTO, California (Reuters) – Texas Governor Rick Perry treated guests at his inauguration to a barbecue lunch paid for by a wealthy businessman. California’s Jerry Brown served taxpayer-funded hot dogs.

The stark contrast in inaugural menus last month highlights the different approaches the two most populous U.S. states are taking to deal with massive budget deficits.

Feb 1, 2011

California’s Brown says voters need voice on budget

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Governor Jerry Brown pressed California lawmakers in his state-of-the-state address on Monday to let voters decide on his budget plan, saying any attempt to block a special election on the issue would be irresponsible.

California, the most populous U.S. state, faces a more than $25 billion deficit caused by the combined effects of recession, high unemployment and turmoil in financial and housing markets.

Jan 28, 2011

Analysis: Obama green job vision faces challenge from abroad

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – CEO Bill Watkins wants to build a $100 million next-generation LED light factory near his Silicon Valley-area headquarters, but China wants the 2,000 jobs he hopes to create.

The head of Livermore-based Bridgelux loves California, USA, but other nations are offering cash and guaranteed markets, tempting the executive who prefers a “Made in America” sticker on his bulbs.

Jan 21, 2011

Athletes allowed to testify in Barry Bonds trial

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Athletes, including former baseball all-star Jason Giambi, will be allowed to testify about getting steroids from Barry Bonds’ trainer when the perjury trial of Major League Baseball’s home run king begins in March, a federal judge said on Friday.

But U.S. District Judge Susan Illston dashed prosecutors’ hopes of introducing calendars and coded drug tests they say link Bonds, 46, to steroid use. She had previously thrown out the evidence as hearsay and a new government argument for its inclusion failed to convince her.

    • About Peter

      "Peter Henderson has worked for Reuters for more than a decade, covering the collapse of the Russian economy in the 1990s, media in Los Angeles and politics in San Francisco. He is West Coast Enterprise Editor, focusing on reporting and editing in-depth stories."
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