Photographers' Blog

Kung Hey Fat Choi

February 7, 2008

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The worst snow storm this year in Southern China had brought train networks to a virtual standstill. Many Chinese hoping to travel home for the Lunar New Year this year’s faced long delays at this the busiest time of the year. 

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Thousands of expectant travellers packed Guangzhou station, they were mostly migrant workers trying to get home for the traditional New Year’s Eve supper with their families. Many of them had waited for days for trains which did not arrive.

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Outside filling the streets around the station, were tens of thousands more being held back by officials.

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By the time I arrived at Guangzhou many of them had already waited for days in the snow and rain to gain access.

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At first the soldiers and policemen managed to split the passengers into orderly groups – but there were just too many

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Everytime a train departed and the gates of the station were opened, everyone just made a dash for it with their luggage and for anyone in their way, like me, it was a terrifying experience.

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Family unity is a very precious thing and it is perfectly understandable that anyone who had been working far away should want to get home for this auspicious occasion. 

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For many of them, getting there was a cold, exhausting and risky business.

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I hope yours will be a happy one requiring far less discomfort - ”Kung Hey Fat Choi.”

Comments
5 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Thanks for highlighting the Chinese’s vows in photos. Just reading about them doesn’t do enough justice.

 

Sorry, I meant woes, not vows.

 

I found your blog via Google blog search while searching for winter photography and your post regarding “Kung Hey Fat Choi” looks very interesting to me. I have a few Photography websites of my own and I must say that your blog is really good. Keep up the great work on a really high class resource. I Love winter photography and for most of us, even the thought of capturing on camera, a great shot of an idyllic winter scene is heartwarming and at the same time mind-numbingly depressing. We all know through bitter experience that a winter photography shot we thought of as perfect, might as well in fact be tossed in the garbage can. One really helpful trick that I learned for winter photography is to meter for something other than the snow

 

True IonBuck

Posted by Diana Ngila | Report as abusive
 

Hi Bobby!
Sorry to post it here, but I just saw one picture that you took on a Table Tennis competition in China yesterday (Feb, 25th) and I wanna say that its an amazing picture. I’m the official table tennis photographer from the Brazilian Confederarion and I’m used to photograph table tennis almost every weekend since 2005. I’m always searching for new and inspirating views and crops.

here’s the link to your photo in a Brazilian website.

http://noticias.uol.com.br/ultnot/album/ 25022008olho_album.jhtm

Congratulations and regards.

Valdecir
valdecir@valdecircarvalho.com.br

 

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