Photographers' Blog

Fishing for the right picture

January 17, 2011

The fishing harbor of Mumbai, India, has been one of my favorite hunting grounds for pictures in the city. It was one of the first places I discovered upon landing in the city seven months ago. The fishing harbor is small, a ‘little’ smelly and very crowded. You can’t stand in one place and if you do, then you’ll be pushed about and abused by the locals who don’t like tourists taking pictures during business hours.

A crane eats a fish from a tub of fish at a wholesale market at a fish harbour in Mumbai January 14, 2011.  REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

For this particular picture I had to wait for almost an hour. I noticed earlier that cranes tried to swoop down on a particular kind of fish being carried by the fisher folks on their heads. Now I had to find a good angle and try to position myself from where I wouldn’t be in anyone’s way and there would still be some room to maneuver.

From atop the ropes of fishing boats tied to a small pillar on the dock appeared to be just that position. It allowed a little height too.

After a long wait I saw a woman with that particular type of fish, known locally as Dhoma (croaker), coming towards me. Suddenly something zipped passed my ear. It was the crane. And the rest was left to my finger and the shutter.

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

We did two crops and both got nice ink. Great picture.

Posted by AltafBhat | Report as abusive
 

What a lovely picture Danish… the guy on the left’s expression makes me laugh every time I see it. Great moment.

Posted by vivpix | Report as abusive
 

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