Comments on: Invisible snow http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/ What makes a great picture? Thu, 18 Aug 2016 11:13:37 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: HolidayNova http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347861 Fri, 16 Dec 2011 15:40:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347861 I hear the prime minster is changed every year. So who’s going to be made responsible. I think that’s the problem, no responsibility. Plus I’m living in Japan temporarily and noone wants to talk about it or think about it.. unless you have too many sake then it all comes out…

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By: Ralphooo http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347210 Tue, 23 Aug 2011 23:25:25 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347210 First of all, this is a wonderful, moving and optimistic story. The author deserves a lot of credit for her work.

Next, about radiation. As a result of accidental exposure to radioactive iodine when I was a child. I personally suffered from thyroid cancer, at age 50. Now, at age 60, I have been free of cancer for almost 10 years.

Thyroid cancer, while it is certainly undesirable, is among the most curable of cancers, oddly because the very substance that gave it to me, radioactive iodine, can also be used to cure the disease in a large majority of cases.

The science and medicine are complex, so I will not try to explain that all here, but it is worth knowing that cancer of the thyroid gland is seldom fatal. Obviously, no one wishes for anyone to become ill. Yet fear, even though real, need not be overwhelming.

Most people from the Fukushima area will probably have perfectly normal lives, without any health problems resulting from the reactor failures. Those accidents were terrible events, but people can realistically have courage, even in the face of risk.

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By: Generations http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347204 Mon, 22 Aug 2011 02:23:55 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347204 I am concerned that the of FuKushima incident and its subsequent low, cumulative exposure to young children may be serious than what we now known scientifically. The society may pay a heavy price down the road if we think this low, chronic exposure radioactivity to the the most sensitive young children is of no health consequences.

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By: wook http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347200 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 19:28:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347200 Sophiewonderful: I would hardly presume to educate the Japanese of the horrors of radiation, or those of Hiroshima. I suspect they know better than the rest of us.
Kudos to the family and the citizens of Fukushima for keeping alive hope in the midst of such fear and catastrophe. May their hopes and dreams come true!

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By: sophiewonderful http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347198 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 18:39:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347198 This is very disturbing to me. I would suggest that anyone who hasn’t seen the documentary “White Light, Black Rain” see this marvelous film about the horrors of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. This isn’t the watered down version most people have seen on t.v. It is very difficult to watch, particularly for very sensitive people, but it shows just how dangerous the radiation actually is. There are still the ‘untouchables’ from 1945 and people born with genetic defects. Now, with so many children showing radiation in their thyroid glands, it is horrifying to contemplate the fate of these poor souls.

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By: Deadrago http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347197 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 17:30:52 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347197 This is a beautiful story, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it! Thank you!
It shines a ray of hope into a very glum-looking world at the moment. If more people in the world were of the mindset to think predominantly of others – and the world we leave for each other and future generations, working for the community instead of just ourselves, what a mutually beneficial, happy place we would be living in!

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By: DrYing http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347193 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 14:19:41 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347193 Absolutely beautiful photo graphs as well as a very good story that is filled with hope – where Hope is an ingredient very much in demand in today’s world. And Koyu Abe deserves a medal or an award for his role.

The story, however, can use a sequel. This is because Cesium-137 has an half-life of about 30 years. That will not change no matter whether Ca-137 is in the soil or in the plants. So removal or harvesting of the plants is eventually required to really remove the Ca-137 from that area of the world.

Fortunately, Ca-137 has industrial uses. So the plant-concentrated Ca-137 has value – which value can be used to both continue future planting as well as harvesting of the plants.

May you write a sequel and also illustrate it with photos as beautiful as those you have published today.

Dr.Ying – The Doctor is Ying :-)

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By: Michael1013 http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347191 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 14:03:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347191 The big question is, is the Japanese government being reckless by allowing residents to continue living in the area? Radiation is forever, the world already has been contaminated with radiation from open air testing during the 1950’s as well as Chernoble and three mile island. Without being told why, people are sold iodized salt. Not knowing the real reason is to reduce thyroid cancer. We’re getting closer to the dark, sunless world of Blade Runner?

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By: DubaiUAE http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347190 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 11:12:40 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347190 Beatiful pictures and a fantastic article, thank you Mrs. Nakao.

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By: erkin6 http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers-blog/2011/08/19/invisible-snow/comment-page-1/#comment-347189 Sun, 21 Aug 2011 11:10:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/photo/?p=22497#comment-347189 how strange that we’ve all seen those people for many mounths later.That made me ask how terribly are they going to affect more after the fukushima ?

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