Photographers' Blog

London: A great city because of its people

May 30, 2012

By Stefan Wermuth

In my view, London is a great city because of its cosmopolitan people who live and work there every day. I wanted to know what they think about this big event called Olympics, which will take place for two weeks in their city.


Laim Carter, a 19 year-old guardsman who has lived in London for two month, poses for a picture in Chelsea. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Carter said: “It’s good.”

I went with my camera and a basic voice recorder to the streets of Balham, Westminster, The City of London, Brixton, Wandsworth, Shoreditch, Battersea, Lambeth and Chelsea and met all kind of different people.


Tim McPherson, a 39 year-old falconer who works in London, poses with his hawk Harry for a picture at Trafalgar Square. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, McPherson said: “It’s good for Britain to host it. But traveling is going to be a nightmare.”

For example, falconer Tim who stands with his falcon Harry on Trafalgar Square to keep the pigeons away in the morning, desktop support technicia Petrica dressed as Captain America who is raising money for charity, vision technician Mark who cleans shop windows, product and development manager Alice who just moved to London and school crossing patrol warden Sue who helps children cross the street, just to name a few.


Sue West, a 59 year-old school crossing patrol warden who has lived all her life in London, poses for a picture in central London. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, West said: “Fantastic! It will bring lots of people into the country. I think it’s going be chaos traffic wise but it will be great for the people and the school children of course.”

β€œWhat do you think about London hosting the Olympics?” That’s the question I have asked more than one hundred times. Finally, more than 50 Londoners gave me an answer and their picture.

Many thanks to all of them!


Petrica Iancu, a 20 year-old desktop support technician who has lived in London for more than one year, poses for a picture in Balham. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Drysdale said, “It’s good for the city but not good for the people who live in the Stratford area where the Olympics take part. Because of the Olympics everything get more expensive and local people can’t afford it.”


Alice Quon, a 23 year-old product and development manager who just moved to London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Quon said, “I think it’s amazing. I am really excited to be part of it. I just wanna see everything i can with all the people that will come from around the world.”


Nicolas Ameline, a 30 year-old salesman who has lived in London for five years, poses for a picture in the City of London. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Ameline said: “I think it’s a great opportunity for London in terms of generating new business. Apart from that it will be a chaos for commuters.”


Salomon Brook, a 37 year-old party shop owner who has lived in London for twenty five years, poses for a picture in Brixton. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Brook said: “I can’t see that the Olympics are coming. When I was in China in 2008 people did a lot more preparation in advance.”


Alex Pose Gil, a 33 year-old restaurant manager who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in central London. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Pose Gil said: “At this present moment, waste of time. Financially and transport wise we are not ready and it will effect the businesses like myself.”

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What were their answers?!

Posted by TomMcLaughlan | Report as abusive
 

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