Birth in India’s “surrogacy capital”

September 30, 2013

Anand, India

By Mansi Thapliyal

A smooth, modern road in the prosperous Indian state of Gujarat leads to 35-year-old Chimanlal’s small, windowless brick hut that he lives in with his wife, young son and two daughters. Earning 2500 rupees ($38) a month as a driver, Chimanial says it is not enough to feed his children. Only his son goes to school. But in a year’s time, their lives are set to change.

Some 50 kilometers (31 miles) away is the small city of Anand, known as India’s “surrogacy capital”. Chimanlai’s wife is carrying a baby for a Japanese couple in which she will be paid 450,000 rupees ($7,200), an unimaginably large amount of money for a family like theirs.

Since 2004, over 500 Indian women have traveled to Anand from neighboring villages and towns to become surrogate mothers for families from nearly 30 countries. Dr Nayana Patel and her husband run Akanksha clinic, the city’s only surrogacy facility.

For nine months, the surrogate mothers live away from their families. They stay at a residency provided by Patel’s clinic. Wearing gowns covering their big bellies, the women pass their time by watching TV, talking on their mobile phones and chatting to each other. Some enjoy the experience and see it as break from their tough daily life, while others miss being away for so long from their husbands and children.

“I’m not ashamed of doing what I’m doing. I don’t care what the neighbors think or what my relatives think because they are not the ones who have to feed my family,” Daksha, 31, Chimanlal’s wife, said. With the money she will earn, she and her husband plan to build a new house and send their daughters to school.

Dr Patel is somewhat of an icon in the small city of Anand. I walk out of my hotel and jump into an auto rickshaw. The driver sees my cameras and assume I’ve come to photograph Dr Patel and her clinic. He tells me: “Almost every journalist or foreigner walking on the streets of Anand is here to meet Dr. Patel.”

I first saw her as she stepped out of her light gold Audi in a beautiful, sparkling sari accessorized by a large, pearl necklace. Dr Patel, a firm woman in total control of operations at her clinic, has made a name for herself by running a successful fertility clinic in this small city which has garnered international attention.

Oprah Winfrey’s now-defunct talk show featured the facility in 2007, a woman Dr Patel clearly admires based on the framed photos of the U.S. daytime TV star that are on the shelves of her clinic.

Daniel and Rekha are a couple from London who heard about the clinic in Anand after watching a documentary on TV. They met Dr Patel in London and wanted her to help them fulfill their lifelong dream of having a child. Soon after, they sold their restaurant business in order to fund the surrogacy treatment and flew to India.

Daniel said it was very emotional for him to meet Naina, the surrogate mother, for the first time a few days before the delivery of the baby. “I was very nervous, it wasn’t romantic for me because I was concerned about the child as well as the surrogate,” he said. It has been a life changing experience for both Rekha and Daniel and they would love to share this with their daughter and tell her about the experience and their special journey to get her.

Unlike Rekha and Daniel, many parents choose not to tell their child and keep it a secret for their entire lives. Rekha and Daniel said they were impressed with the amount of knowledge Dr. Patel had but they wished there were improved guidelines to follow that could improve the communication between all parties.

Though some have described the clinic as an exploitative baby factory. Dr Patel disagrees: “There is nothing immoral or wrong in this. A woman is helping another woman, one who does not have the capacity to have a baby and the other who doesn’t have the capacity to lead a good life. And when the end result is a lovely baby how can you say there is something wrong happening?”

This may satisfy many people but it leaves one thinking about two people involved in this process. One is the surrogate who is putting her physical and mental health at risk in order to fulfill her family’s dreams. How is society affected when it accepts women using their bodies like this?

The other is the child who is the product of this transaction. Shouldn’t he/she have the right to know the identity of any/all of the people involved in that child’s conception and delivery?

5 comments

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It’s a good thing that it’s against the law in most countries to “buy” children. Then, there are no prohibitions to renting them.

Posted by ptiffany | Report as abusive

I don’t have a problem with this – counter to the tenor of the article.

Posted by ssor | Report as abusive

Nothing wrong with this if its a once in a lifetime match. The operations look perfectly good, organized and clean. I would have a problem if a) women were “sold” to the clinic or b) birth mothers came to do this more than once. Both of these actions would invite in the mafia and shady dealings. It seems the clinic is above this and running a proper customer centric business – and taking their fare share of fees.

Posted by John2244 | Report as abusive

I think it’s ridiculous the extremes people go to to ensure their own genetic material is reproduced, especially with orphanages operating above capacity.

Posted by Reutered | Report as abusive

“especially with orphanages operating above capacity.”

Do you know how hard international adoption is and how much it costs? You could end up spending as much as a surrogacy.

Countries need to stop making it so difficult. There are plenty of families and individuals around the world that would take these kids in.

Posted by Marcooooo | Report as abusive