Photographers' Blog

A year without the Comandante

March 13, 2014

Caracas, Venezuela

By Jorge Silva

March 5, 2014

Once in a great while there comes a day that marks the end of an era. That’s what happened the afternoon Hugo Chavez died.

It was a year ago as I write this blog, and at times I still find it hard to believe. He was such a dominant presence that in the days after his death that it seemed he would appear at any moment on national TV or in a military parade. The months passed and reality sank in. Today Venezuela seems to be a very different country from the one he left behind. It feels as if it happened a long time ago.

Chavez’s death also coincided with my tenth year documenting his controversial Bolivarian Revolution. He was the Revolution’s icon and his bombastic personality was the focus of almost all that we covered during those years. The story of Venezuela and Chavez were one and the same.

Journalistically speaking, it was a sensational story. As a photographer I found him to be a politician who understood the news media well and knew how to manipulate his image through it. He proved that whenever he was giving a speech, playing baseball, or lifting a rifle.

Chavez was a rare figure in the story of any nation. He changed the course of Venezuela’s history, and not just because he renamed the country, oversaw the redrafting of its constitution, redesigned the flag, and redrew its time-zone map. He was both hated by opponents who denounced him as authoritarian and corrupt, and beloved by his supporters for permanently placing poverty and social inclusion at the center of the political agenda.

The debate over his legacy and its rights and wrongs will last many years, probably without any agreement between those who followed him religiously and those who hated him with a passion. But maybe they will agree that he did have powerful charisma and was a compelling showman.

Chavez was the main topic of conversation for both friends and foes over the last 15 years. His dominant media presence made him a towering figure in the collective imagination. For many Venezuelans he was much more than just a politician.

I first came to Caracas late in 2002, when a massive petroleum workers strike was organized to try and oust him. The movement failed, and Chavez emerged stronger.

In the following years everything happened so quickly – trips, summits, referendums, campaigns and elections – but none was a better example of the fervor and passion that Chavez provoked among his supporters than the closing of his re-election campaign in October, 2012. Chavez knew he had little time left to live as he spoke to his followers in the pouring rain - a cinematic act before the masses.

Then came the days of his funeral, his final political act. He seemed to stop being a politician and was treated by many almost as a religious figure.

His funeral was without a doubt one of the most impressive demonstrations of political and quasi-religious fervor that I ever covered as a photographer.

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

LOS QUE TUVIMOS EL PRIVILEGIO DE ESTAR PRESENTES EN LOS MOMENTOS QUE EL PRESIDENTE HUGO CHAVEZ VINO A LA REPUBLICA DOMINICANA, SOMOS TESTIGOS DE LA HISTORIA. SU CARISMA, ESE ANGEL EN LA PERSONALIDAD, Y SOBRE TODO, QUE PONIA ATENCION A LOS DETALLES QUE LE RODEABAN, HUMANOS Y SENSIBLES.

Posted by guerrero1000 | Report as abusive
 

Fantastic blog post, this is an absolutely fantastic blog

Posted by lawrencereid | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
  • Editors & Key Contributors