Photographers' Blog

Living the Peruvian dream

Gosen City, Lima, Peru
By Mariana Bazo

Life in the settlements on the outskirts of Lima can be very hard, but years of economic growth in Peru have helped benefit even some of its poorest residents. In one shantytown called Gosen City, a cluster of houses that grew up haphazardly around a garbage dump, this change is really starting to show.

Peru has experienced a decade-long boom, and although growth slowed somewhat last year, changes and development continue. The government has pledged to dramatically cut poverty rates, and while it still has a long way to go, around 490,000 Peruvians were raised out of poverty last year, according to official statistics.

I decided to go to Gosen City, which stands high on a hill above the capital, precisely because on previous visits I found it to be a place of extreme destitution. This time, however, I interviewed a group of people who in some ways have seen their lives improve in recent years.

Carpenter Antonio Abad poses in his workshop in Gosen City, a slum that began years ago as an informal settlement in the Villa Maria del Triunfo municipality  on the outskirts of Lima,  March 18, 2014. Abad arrived in Gosen City in 1995, when it was just a settlement, and began helping neighbors build their homes and now has a factory that makes windows, doors, and furniture. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

Neighborhood leader Honorata Huaman makes a living selling cakes, but rather than wanting to get rich she does it to help schoolchildren in the area. I asked her why and she explained that as a child she had nothing, but then good people helped her to improve her situation and now she wants to do the same for others.

Honorata Huaman poses with cakes and soy juice she sells in Gosen City, a slum that began years ago as an informal settlement in the Villa Maria del Triunfo municipality  on the outskirts of Lima,  April 10, 2014. Huaman makes a living selling cakes, and uses most of her profits to help needy schoolchildren in the neighborhood. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

She has had a hard life. When she was just 9 years old and living in the highland town of Ayacucho, her mother sold her for a sack of rice and another of barley and she was brought to Lima. Later, she had to free herself from an abusive husband, with whom she has four children, and she also had cancer.

Goals all over the world

London, United Kingdom

By Russell Boyce

Sometimes the best ideas are also the simplest ones, especially when you have the support of the world’s biggest news agency behind you.

Inspired by the energy generated by a Wider Image workshop with our photographers in South America, I wanted to work on a global story about the Brazil 2014 World Cup. So many superlatives are used to describe it: the world’s greatest show, the most watched tournament, the biggest sporting event.

I needed a big idea that could demonstrate the worldwide reach of football (or soccer, for our U.S. readers) and I wanted to include our global team of busy photographers. For them to find the time to get involved, the idea had to be simple.

Life on a leash

Daohui village, China

By William Hong

Every morning, as soon as Xie Juntu wakes up, he ties his grandson to a pillar. His aim, however, is not to torture the boy but to keep him safe and save the family from bankruptcy.

When I met him in the remote Chinese village of Daohui, Juntu’s grandson Guobiao looked like any other normal 11-year-old. The only difference was the rope that prevented him moving more than a few steps away from the place where he had been tied.

Juntu explained the situation. He said that when his daughter-in-law gave birth to Guobiao, a landslide blocked vehicles from leaving the village. It was a difficult labour. Four neighbours managed to carry the mother on foot to the nearest town with a maternity hospital, but it was too late to save the baby from suffering brain damage from lack of oxygen during the long birth.

Daily life in Shi’ite Baghdad

Baghdad, Iraq

By Ahmed Jadallah

When people mention Sunnis and Shi’ites, the topic is often sectarian violence.

This is certainly true in Iraq. The country’s former ruler Saddam Hussain came from the Iraq’s Sunni minority, but since he was overthrown, Shi’ites have dominated Iraqi politics. Now, over the past year, Sunni insurgents who target Shi’ites have been gaining ground and violence has spiraled.

With the government battling Sunni rebels, I wanted to take a step back and show the human face of the divided communities. So in Baghdad I went to photograph daily life inside some of its poor, Shi’ite neighbourhoods.

After the avalanche – ascent to Everest

Everest, Nepal

By Navesh Chitrakar

I went to document life around Everest just a week after 16 Nepali Sherpa guides were killed there in an avalanche. In total more than 4,000 people have reached Everest’s summit, and about 250 people have died climbing it. But this was the deadliest single accident in the mountain’s history.

It had big consequences. After the disaster, Sherpas staged a boycott and refused to take foreign climbers up the mountain. Guides take huge risks when they help tourists up Everest, but sometimes they earn as little as $1,000 in a season. Many are angry with the Nepali government, which makes a lot of money from the dangerous business, and these feelings have fuelled their actions.

So when I flew to Everest to photograph the situation, I knew that all would not be well.  

Living on e-waste

Dongxiaokou village, China

By Kim Kyung-Hoon

Dongxiaokou village lies just on the outskirts of Beijing, but a trip there does not really offer a pleasant escape from the city centre. For Dongxiaokou is no ordinary village: it is a hub for rubbish.

A waste recycle worker looks around a broken piano which he recently picked up from the street at the yard of his tenement house at Dongxiaokou village in Beijing May 14, 2014. This village is known as Beijing's biggest site for the disposal and recycling of electronic waste and it has been the home of E-waste collectors and recyclers for a decade.    REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA)

For years, the area has been home to people who make their living by collecting and recycling electrical and electronic waste – from abandoned air-conditioners to fridges and TV sets. Several hundred families work to gather this “e-waste” from people in wealthy, downtown Beijing.

No one knows the exact number of people involved because many are migrant workers who don’t have licenses for their recycling businesses or permanent residency permits through China’s “hukou” system. They live on the margins in more senses than one, and as summer approached I went to document their lives.

Down and dirty English

WARNING: SEXUAL CONTENT

Belo Horizonte, Brazil

By Pilar Olivares

As I went chasing after “ladies of the night” (who sometimes work in the daytime too) I discovered that some of them are proud to be sex workers, almost too proud to be bothered by someone like me – a photographer looking for a good story.

I was on an assignment to take pictures of a group of prostitutes who are taking English classes once a week in preparation for the World Cup. They hope these lessons will help them communicate better with soccer fans who might use their services when they come to Brazil.

Of all my subjects, the most elusive character to photograph was Cida Vieira, the president of the Association of Prostitutes of Minas Gerais (APROSMIG), based in the southeastern Brazilian state whose capital is Belo Horizonte.

Lights, Camera, Action

Sydney, Australia

Jason Reed

Sydney is one of the first cities to celebrate the coming of the New Year every January 1, and people around the globe are familiar with the spectacular fireworks that accompany many a popped champagne cork as the clock strikes midnight.

When I was a young boy, my family would join thousands of others and find a spot along the harbour foreshore to drink it all in (the fireworks that is!). We never went to the same place twice and it was always an adventure. Now, all grown up and armed with a camera, I went on an assignment that helped me relive some of those childhood memories.

 

I was covering the Vivid Sydney festival, a spectacle of light, talks and music that is not as well known as the city’s New Year’s celebrations, but still a sight to see.

Remembering D-Day, 70 years on

Omaha Beach, France

By Chris Helgren

During the years of my career that I spent working in Europe, I met many veterans who fought and lost friends on World War Two battlefields.

One such occasion was in 2009, when I went to Normandy to cover the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings, the allied invasion that spelled the beginning of the end for Nazi Germany.  

President Barack Obama arrived at the American cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, where more than 9,000 soldiers are buried, to pay tribute to those who gave their lives. I was only covering the Canadian contingent during this trip – a comparatively small part of the proceedings – but I vowed to return at a later date to explore the area.

Lives washed away

Zepce, Bosnia

By Dado Ruvic

For many days since the floods in the Balkans began, I have woken up with tears in my eyes. I have been looking at my friends in disbelief, watching as their lives slowly crumble.

Bosnia has been devastated by the worst floods to hit the region in living memory. More than a million people have been cut off from clean water, 100,000 buildings have been left uninhabitable and over half a million people have left their homes.

From the beginning of this crisis, I have felt a struggle within myself between the man who is watching his friends and family suffer, and the journalist, who is trying to document it all for the rest of the world.

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