Photographers' Blog

The other Pakistan

Islamabad, Pakistan

By Zohra Bensemra

A fist slams into a punching bag. Sparks flare from a saw as a punk carves a huge guitar from a block of stone. A female climber dangles precariously from a cliff.

A Pakistani interior designer Zahra Afridi uses a circular saw as she sculpts a guitar outside the classic rock cafe she designed in Islamabad

Welcome to Pakistan, a country of 180 million people whose residents are as varied as they come. Among them are millionaires and beggars, child brides and female executives, the Taliban and an ultra-chic international jet set.

Many Pakistanis feel angry that headlines about their beloved nation are dominated by violence and extremism, saying that a number of troublemakers has been allowed to define their country’s image.

Everyone has heard of Malala, the schoolgirl activist shot by the Taliban, but few outside the country know about the exploding private education sector. The private Beaconhouse School System, for example, has established around 150 schools across the country.

Aleena Raza  who manages her mother's business reads a book at her bedroom in Lahore

People are familiar with images of burning American flags but beyond the photo frame, in the newly-built gated community of Bahria Town, stands a new Classic Rock café likely to be home to latte-sipping Twitterati, not far from a luxury cinema and American-style houses.

On the Sidelines of the Brazil World Cup

Miami, United States

Russell Boyce

As national soccer teams and the photographers who have been covering them start to trickle home from the Brazil World Cup, it’s time to revisit the “On the Sidelines” project.

This Reuters Pictures project was billed as a chance for photographers to share “their own quirky and creative view of the World Cup”. I thought that I’d examine what has been achieved.

The media bus driver is reflected in a mirror during the trip away from the Pernambuco arena in the rain in Recife June 28, 2014.  In a project called 'On the Sidelines' Reuters photographers share pictures showing their own quirky and creative view of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder    (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY TRANSPORT) - RTR3WAK2

As a way of introducing the project, let me use a comparison. I’m intrigued by the notion that an animal that has been caged, but is well fed and well treated, will not exchange freedom from its pen for the uncertainty that this freedom might bring.

The world’s best commute?

London, United Kingdom

By Toby Melville

As a Reuters Photographer based in London, an average commute to my first assignment of the day – normally covering either a political or business story in the city centre – would take roughly an hour. That’s 60 minutes, to drive all of 8 miles.

These commutes take place in the morning rush hour, when I find myself bumper-to-bumper with thousands of other short-tempered drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, buses and taxis. And I do this journey while trying to get to my first job, usually in a state of tension and anxiety…

But for two weeks a year it is different. Completely different. Commuting is fantastic.  

Seeking refuge in Sweden

Stockholm, Sweden

By Cathal McNaughton

Gaining the trust of asylum seekers I met in Sweden and taking pictures that would grab the viewer’s attention and convey the tremendous struggles and dangers they had faced was a challenge.

They were scared and suspicious and in most cases had family back in their homeland who were in danger.

As a photojournalist, the last thing I want to do is compromise someone’s life for a photograph, but I also needed to tell these people’s stories.

The people’s game

Sao Paulo, Brazil

By Eddie Keogh

Former Liverpool F.C. manager Bill Shankly once said: “Some people believe football is a matter of life and death, I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that.”

I think that he may have learnt that in Brazil.

Brazil's soccer fans watch their team play against Chile during a 2014 World Cup round of 16 game, in a restaurant in Sao Paulo June 28, 2014. Brazil won the match. Picture taken June 28. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

I am covering the 2014 World Cup, and to capture the action, I usually sit by the side of the pitch.

But on June 28, when Brazil went head-to-head with Chile for a place in the quarterfinals, my project was to document what this tournament means to ordinary Brazilians, who in most cases can only dream of getting a ticket to see an actual World Cup match.  

The soccer ball as protagonist

Brasilia, Brazil

By Ueslei Marcelino

Most Brazilians, rich or poor, are passionate about soccer. But that’s not to say that this love of the sport permanently unites the nation – recent protests over the World Cup have made that clear.

Brazilian society still suffers from class division and there is a wide gap between the wealthy and the less well-off. It seems to me that we Brazilians are not one people, but for a short while, whenever the national team plays, we can pretend we are.

Milton Souto is poor. Agenor Netto is wealthy. I went to photograph them in their respective homes as they watched Brazil play Chile on June 28th in a round-of-16 World Cup soccer match.

Tour de France Fever

Yorkshire, United Kingdom

By Phil Noble

This is a World Cup year, so fans across the globe are getting tossed around on the roller coaster of emotions that goes along with supporting your national soccer team.

In England, this usually means seeing the streets and cars covered with plastic national flags, while grown men wearing skin-tight soccer jerseys hurl abuse at television screens before drowning their sorrows in the pub.

But this year is different, or at least in part of England it is. This year sees the great cycling race, the Tour de France, starting in the northern English region of Yorkshire.

The good, the bad, and the ugly – diary of a World Cup photographer

Dylan Martinez, chief photographer for the United Kingdom and Ireland, is in Brazil to cover the World Cup. He’ll be keeping a diary of the highs and lows here.  

Sunday July 13

A sunny and very pleasant Rio de Janeiro

So how many nights, matches, sidelines, meals, pictures, headaches, national anthems, football chants, hotels, flights, taxis, new faces, friends, annoying people, breakfasts, uncomfortable beds, beards, repeats of useless sitcoms, stolen cameras, hotel laundries, bags, beers and dodgy rooms have we had now?

Answer: too many.

Well, after all that, there was this game of football. And Germany winning 1-0 was not my preferred score. Just saying. 

Suarez v Chiellini – capturing the moment

Uruguay’s Luis Suarez has been banned for a record nine international soccer matches for biting the Italian player Giorgio Chiellini during a World Cup game. Reuters photographer Tony Gentile captured a key picture, showing the marks on Chiellini’s shoulder after the incident. Here, he describes covering the match.

Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows his shoulder, claiming he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal

Recife, Brazil

By Tony Gentile

The World Cup is one of the most important events we cover as photographers, drawing the attention of fans from all over the world.

A couple of days ago I witnessed one of the big moments in this big story. I was covering Italy v. Uruguay and it felt almost just like any other match, with a little added interest because my own national team, Italy, was playing.

Athens’ Ghost Airport

Athens, Greece

By Yorgos Karahalis

It’s been over a decade since Athens’ Hellenikon airport closed down after around 60 years of duty as the only airport serving the Greek capital.

 Olympic Airways airplanes are seen at the premises of the former Athens International airport of Hellenikon June 16, 2014. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis

In 2001, just three years before Athens hosted the Olympic Games, Hellenikon was abandoned in favour of the glitzy new Eleftherios Venizelos airport, constructed to the east of the city. 

What has happened to Hellenikon since then?

Well, the glory days of the airport are long gone.

A station for the airport's limousine service is seen outside the east terminal of the former Athens International Airport of Hellenikon June 17, 2014. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis

Nothing has been done with the property aside from using part of the land to construct a few secondary sports facilities for use during the 2004 Olympics. In turn, these too now stand abandoned.  

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